Update to statically linked gcc 4.9.1.

Rebuild the tools but statically linked to prevent dependencies on some
shared libs gcc uses, that aren't available in some desktop machine's
linux distros.

Change-Id: Iea4a19444276bda62f402f0663257f2ba3b9249e
diff --git a/README.build b/README.build
index b0b8497..251a290 100644
--- a/README.build
+++ b/README.build
@@ -21,6 +21,37 @@
 # BR2_TARGET_ROOTFS_TAR is not set
 ----------------------------------------------------
 
+
+-- Next apply this patch to make all of the host build statically
+   to remove dependence on locally generated shared libs.
+
+----------------------------------------------------------------------
+From 39c92fa91756747fa8eaf1fc898214658d1f8451 Mon Sep 17 00:00:00 2001
+From: John Newlin <jnewlin@google.com>
+Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 21:58:51 -0700
+Subject: [PATCH] Build libraries statically to make hermetic builds work.
+
+---
+ package/pkg-autotools.mk | 2 +-
+ 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)
+
+diff --git a/package/pkg-autotools.mk b/package/pkg-autotools.mk
+index 4404f15..e4e4df9 100644
+--- a/package/pkg-autotools.mk
++++ b/package/pkg-autotools.mk
+@@ -165,7 +165,7 @@ define $(2)_CONFIGURE_CMDS
+                ./configure \
+                --prefix="$$(HOST_DIR)/usr" \
+                --sysconfdir="$$(HOST_DIR)/etc" \
+-               --enable-shared --disable-static \
++               --disable-shared --enable-static \
+                --disable-gtk-doc \
+                --disable-doc \
+                --disable-docs \
+-- 
+2.1.0.rc2.206.gedb03e5
+----------------------------------------------------------------------
+
 Run 'make'  (go grab some coffee this will take awhile)
 
 
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index 90d26c1..4926e9c 100755
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index 4d6b8e8..72449ad 100755
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index a6ef778..50ce1a6 100755
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index 3bf7ae8..db42966 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/GEORGIAN-ACADEMY.so
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index 3145c76..581ca7c 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/GEORGIAN-PS.so
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index ac44f7f..8898b0a 100755
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index f5c0f80..d286b44 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/GREEK-CCITT.so
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index ef12673..4cb6aa6 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/GREEK7-OLD.so
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index 86ce9cf..3ee62cc 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/HP-GREEK8.so
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index 5955736..21ac20f 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/HP-ROMAN8.so
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index f3f03cf..f84af69 100755
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index 46514e2..ec1f453 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/HP-THAI8.so
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index 66947e4..6494571 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/HP-TURKISH8.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM037.so
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index 57363c6..5096323 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM038.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1004.so
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index 54e79fc..bda2cfb 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1008.so
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index 909f74d..2afd104 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1008_420.so
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index 2060fbe..4ecb5e4 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1025.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1026.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1046.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1047.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1097.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1112.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1122.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1123.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1141.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1149.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1153.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1155.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1156.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1157.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1158.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1161.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1162.so
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index f40c96d..3a6857d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1163.so
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index af937c2..fd6ccd3 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1166.so
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index 6e62646..054663a 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1167.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM12712.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM12712.so
index 440d2b6..e1b0163 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM12712.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1364.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1364.so
index 5464fe8..62515a5 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1364.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1371.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1371.so
index c74efa9..09cc75d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1371.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1388.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1388.so
index b3f4e66..a68f9cf 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1388.so
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index f38fe23..182cfb0 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1390.so
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index aa29e80..c69b2e1 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM1399.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM16804.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM16804.so
index 5f7f07c..9eccda2 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM16804.so
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index 2ecb372..864bd00 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM256.so
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index c4f18f1..1820afb 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM273.so
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index 713bc85..47c40f4 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM274.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM275.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM275.so
index 6edc2bf..1fb8df8 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM275.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM277.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM277.so
index e989d67..fb8a390 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM277.so
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index cbccc6f..1a8c72d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM278.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM280.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM280.so
index 5d491d6..aceaadb 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM280.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM281.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM281.so
index b292b61..ee487a7 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM281.so
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index 0ad66ec..350e1df 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM284.so
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index 6f00d4d..f2233d1 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM285.so
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index 84ccc85..a49ba7c 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM290.so
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index 38e1682..15eb0ab 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM297.so
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index 69094c4..8bd0104 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM420.so
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index a3aa97f..48275b4 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM423.so
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index cbd490f..aa7338b 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM424.so
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index b69e05e..caa6271 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM437.so
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index 92bcdfd..781787a 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM4517.so
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index 4d8c81a..18a7878 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM4899.so
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index 32abcf4..9cfc341 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM4909.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM4971.so
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index f53534b..a1f0fda 100755
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index 7addf10..bd4b126 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM5347.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM864.so
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index e44ef6b..67571a4 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM866NAV.so
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--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM868.so
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index de6cabb..ad16ad1 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM9030.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM904.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM904.so
index 428e6a7..2f4e74c 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM904.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM905.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM905.so
index 96298f5..149cb8e 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM905.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM905.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM9066.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM9066.so
index d10eefb..572a05d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM9066.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM9066.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM918.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM918.so
index 7a7573c..f67a9bf 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM918.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM918.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM921.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM921.so
index 1f4ca70..1e6d4b0 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM921.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM921.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM922.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM922.so
index 118b279..0184065 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM922.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM922.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM930.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM930.so
index 52bb6cf..894dc68 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM930.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM930.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM932.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM932.so
index ed680ee..e8a8572 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM932.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM932.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM933.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM933.so
index a6ad9e2..6234500 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM933.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM933.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM935.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM935.so
index c410959..ad10be7 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM935.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM935.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM937.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM937.so
index f9f4ba0..5f21f0e 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM937.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM937.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM939.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM939.so
index cc401f5..c8007a3 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM939.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM939.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM943.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM943.so
index 3969afe..5949706 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM943.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM943.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM9448.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM9448.so
index 7f618ba..9b70df8 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM9448.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IBM9448.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IEC_P27-1.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IEC_P27-1.so
index e8f9662..be807a1 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IEC_P27-1.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/IEC_P27-1.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS-8.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS-8.so
index a143081..fe1bc76 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS-8.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS-CYRILLIC.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS-CYRILLIC.so
index 75edb6d..c0c37b6 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS-CYRILLIC.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS-CYRILLIC.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS.so
index 33a543c..0399dc4 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/INIS.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISIRI-3342.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISIRI-3342.so
index 1598a18..700adc2 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISIRI-3342.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-CN-EXT.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-CN-EXT.so
index 04c8ef7..c89fcf7 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-CN-EXT.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-CN-EXT.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-CN.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-CN.so
index 78a30ab..de5cf04 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-CN.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-JP-3.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-JP-3.so
index 6619e86..60eacf6 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-JP-3.so
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-JP-3.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-JP.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-JP.so
index 9281b10..3299920 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-JP.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-KR.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-KR.so
index feca3d1..260bad4 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-2022-KR.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-IR-197.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-IR-197.so
index 0edb159..1129677 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-IR-197.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-IR-209.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-IR-209.so
index a1beeb2..da6108b 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO-IR-209.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO646.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO646.so
index 5f36ccd..86e74df 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO646.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-1.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-1.so
index 8fd1688..ef3665d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-1.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-10.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-10.so
index a5068ba..1b1ec1d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-10.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-11.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-11.so
index 6fddcdb..b3df008 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-11.so
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index c042191..71ba9ce 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-13.so
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index 5895deb..cd84dc7 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-14.so
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index 2b8ff67..4b6d1d9 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-15.so
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index 56e681b..a0102f3 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-16.so
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index 6727710..51b2c72 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-2.so
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index bc478a0..90d6506 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-3.so
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index ef2b8ab..c8bdd01 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-4.so
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index b560114..2b52e38 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-5.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-6.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-6.so
index 604564a..7b1de4c 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-6.so
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index d34ab20..13fc1ed 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-7.so
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index aad16db..a699267 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-8.so
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index c5be8e4..357922d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-9.so
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index b191930..5c8eac8 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO8859-9E.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_10367-BOX.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_10367-BOX.so
index 09d5fc0..15b5ec2 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_10367-BOX.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_11548-1.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_11548-1.so
index cfd8f7c..f5830f4 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_11548-1.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_2033.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_2033.so
index 350eacc..e63b503 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_2033.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_5427-EXT.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_5427-EXT.so
index 1f3dc56..85236e0 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_5427-EXT.so
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index 081663e..2752061 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_5427.so
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index fe9b72b..4980a19 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_5428.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_6937-2.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_6937-2.so
index f7742d1..e4ec8c7 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_6937-2.so
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index 6aa23c9..86925a1 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/ISO_6937.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/JOHAB.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/JOHAB.so
index d54fbd3..f8ba03c 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/JOHAB.so
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diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/KOI-8.so b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/KOI-8.so
index 7b66fc6..e9d860a 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/KOI-8.so
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index 95bfaff..4019c5a 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/lib/gconv/KOI8-R.so
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index 0613880..9e1ca1d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/POSIX_V7_ILP32_OFF32
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/POSIX_V7_ILP32_OFF32
Binary files differ
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/POSIX_V7_ILP32_OFFBIG b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/POSIX_V7_ILP32_OFFBIG
index 0613880..9e1ca1d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/POSIX_V7_ILP32_OFFBIG
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/POSIX_V7_ILP32_OFFBIG
Binary files differ
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/XBS5_ILP32_OFF32 b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/XBS5_ILP32_OFF32
index 0613880..9e1ca1d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/XBS5_ILP32_OFF32
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/XBS5_ILP32_OFF32
Binary files differ
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/XBS5_ILP32_OFFBIG b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/XBS5_ILP32_OFFBIG
index 0613880..9e1ca1d 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/XBS5_ILP32_OFFBIG
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/libexec/getconf/XBS5_ILP32_OFFBIG
Binary files differ
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/iconvconfig b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/iconvconfig
index d4a7712..9b88f36 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/iconvconfig
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/iconvconfig
Binary files differ
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/nscd b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/nscd
index 14018c9..3a312d1 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/nscd
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/nscd
Binary files differ
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/zdump b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/zdump
index fed6404..278ad8a 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/zdump
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/zdump
Binary files differ
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/zic b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/zic
index ae1eca3..fd4b94c 100755
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/zic
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/sbin/zic
Binary files differ
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info
index 7e49bff..21b89f8 100644
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info
@@ -1,7 +1,24 @@
-This is
-/usr/local/google/home/jnewlin/src/uclibc/buildroot/output/build/glibc-2.19/build/manual/libc.info,
-produced by makeinfo version 4.13 from libc.texinfo.
+This is libc.info, produced by makeinfo version 5.2 from libc.texinfo.
 
+This file documents the GNU C Library.
+
+   This is 'The GNU C Library Reference Manual', for version 2.19
+(Buildroot).
+
+   Copyright (C) 1993-2014 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+
+   Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
+under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3 or
+any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with the
+Invariant Sections being "Free Software Needs Free Documentation" and
+"GNU Lesser General Public License", the Front-Cover texts being "A GNU
+Manual", and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a) below.  A copy of the
+license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation
+License".
+
+   (a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: "You have the freedom to copy and
+modify this GNU manual.  Buying copies from the FSF supports it in
+developing GNU and promoting software freedom."
 INFO-DIR-SECTION Software libraries
 START-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
 * Libc: (libc).                 C library.
@@ -1692,758 +1709,740 @@
 * ynl: (libc)Special Functions.
 END-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
 
-   This file documents the GNU C Library.
-
-   This is `The GNU C Library Reference Manual', for version 2.19
-(Buildroot).
-
-   Copyright (C) 1993-2014 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-   Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
-under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version
-1.3 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
-with the Invariant Sections being "Free Software Needs Free
-Documentation" and "GNU Lesser General Public License", the Front-Cover
-texts being "A GNU Manual", and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a)
-below.  A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU
-Free Documentation License".
-
-   (a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: "You have the freedom to copy and
-modify this GNU manual.  Buying copies from the FSF supports it in
-developing GNU and promoting software freedom."
-
 
 Indirect:
-libc.info-1: 64179
-libc.info-2: 362623
-libc.info-3: 660437
-libc.info-4: 960045
-libc.info-5: 1258958
-libc.info-6: 1555484
-libc.info-7: 1849446
-libc.info-8: 2147081
-libc.info-9: 2446946
-libc.info-10: 2618618
-libc.info-11: 2891605
-libc.info-12: 3067919
+libc.info-1: 64085
+libc.info-2: 365308
+libc.info-3: 664384
+libc.info-4: 968444
+libc.info-5: 1267893
+libc.info-6: 1568219
+libc.info-7: 1864094
+libc.info-8: 2164465
+libc.info-9: 2467785
+libc.info-10: 2766282
+libc.info-11: 3064697
+libc.info-12: 3528714
+libc.info-13: 3688300
+libc.info-14: 4031944
 
 Tag Table:
 (Indirect)
-Node: Top64179
-Node: Introduction123999
-Node: Getting Started125350
-Node: Standards and Portability126814
-Node: ISO C128269
-Node: POSIX129797
-Node: POSIX Safety Concepts131890
-Node: Unsafe Features137597
-Node: Conditionally Safe Features142142
-Node: Other Safety Remarks153490
-Node: Berkeley Unix162234
-Node: SVID163007
-Node: XPG164016
-Node: Using the Library164966
-Node: Header Files165694
-Node: Macro Definitions169655
-Node: Reserved Names172004
-Node: Feature Test Macros176727
-Node: Roadmap to the Manual186353
-Node: Error Reporting193681
-Node: Checking for Errors194600
-Node: Error Codes198846
-Node: Error Messages218579
-Node: Memory234622
-Node: Memory Concepts235480
-Node: Memory Allocation241162
-Node: Memory Allocation and C242068
-Node: Unconstrained Allocation245645
-Node: Basic Allocation247074
-Node: Malloc Examples248898
-Node: Freeing after Malloc250854
-Node: Changing Block Size252897
-Node: Allocating Cleared Space255615
-Node: Efficiency and Malloc256747
-Node: Aligned Memory Blocks257859
-Node: Malloc Tunable Parameters261863
-Node: Heap Consistency Checking264296
-Node: Hooks for Malloc269704
-Node: Statistics of Malloc276001
-Node: Summary of Malloc278111
-Node: Allocation Debugging280727
-Node: Tracing malloc281839
-Node: Using the Memory Debugger284062
-Node: Tips for the Memory Debugger285955
-Node: Interpreting the traces287271
-Node: Obstacks290809
-Node: Creating Obstacks292432
-Node: Preparing for Obstacks294347
-Node: Allocation in an Obstack297208
-Node: Freeing Obstack Objects299980
-Node: Obstack Functions301442
-Node: Growing Objects303685
-Node: Extra Fast Growing308877
-Node: Status of an Obstack313048
-Node: Obstacks Data Alignment314781
-Node: Obstack Chunks316756
-Node: Summary of Obstacks319214
-Node: Variable Size Automatic322644
-Node: Alloca Example324268
-Node: Advantages of Alloca325402
-Node: Disadvantages of Alloca327302
-Node: GNU C Variable-Size Arrays328058
-Node: Resizing the Data Segment329227
-Node: Locking Pages331524
-Node: Why Lock Pages332266
-Node: Locked Memory Details333905
-Node: Page Lock Functions336174
-Node: Character Handling342404
-Node: Classification of Characters343862
-Node: Case Conversion348899
-Node: Classification of Wide Characters351236
-Node: Using Wide Char Classes360307
-Node: Wide Character Case Conversion362623
-Node: String and Array Utilities365695
-Node: Representation of Strings367760
-Node: String/Array Conventions373289
-Node: String Length376227
-Node: Copying and Concatenation380391
-Node: String/Array Comparison408293
-Node: Collation Functions419523
-Node: Search Functions430212
-Node: Finding Tokens in a String444608
-Node: strfry456714
-Node: Trivial Encryption457836
-Node: Encode Binary Data459393
-Node: Argz and Envz Vectors464257
-Node: Argz Functions464864
-Node: Envz Functions472605
-Node: Character Set Handling476132
-Node: Extended Char Intro477285
-Node: Charset Function Overview490402
-Node: Restartable multibyte conversion491370
-Node: Selecting the Conversion493485
-Node: Keeping the state495868
-Node: Converting a Character499188
-Node: Converting Strings515950
-Node: Multibyte Conversion Example526718
-Node: Non-reentrant Conversion529669
-Node: Non-reentrant Character Conversion531358
-Node: Non-reentrant String Conversion536502
-Node: Shift State539773
-Node: Generic Charset Conversion542435
-Node: Generic Conversion Interface545627
-Node: iconv Examples555962
-Node: Other iconv Implementations561260
-Node: glibc iconv Implementation566659
-Node: Locales606202
-Node: Effects of Locale607872
-Node: Choosing Locale609841
-Node: Locale Categories611220
-Node: Setting the Locale613742
-Node: Standard Locales618775
-Node: Locale Information620069
-Node: The Lame Way to Locale Data621790
-Node: General Numeric623788
-Node: Currency Symbol626784
-Node: Sign of Money Amount630985
-Node: The Elegant and Fast Way633128
-Node: Formatting Numbers645368
-Node: Yes-or-No Questions654905
-Node: Message Translation657092
-Node: Message catalogs a la X/Open659134
-Node: The catgets Functions660437
-Node: The message catalog files669772
-Node: The gencat program676520
-Node: Common Usage679663
-Node: The Uniforum approach686827
-Node: Message catalogs with gettext688326
-Node: Translation with gettext689370
-Node: Locating gettext catalog696109
-Node: Advanced gettext functions703196
-Ref: Advanced gettext functions-Footnote-1714357
-Node: Charset conversion in gettext714449
-Node: GUI program problems717052
-Node: Using gettextized software722599
-Node: Helper programs for gettext730928
-Node: Searching and Sorting732705
-Node: Comparison Functions733621
-Node: Array Search Function734838
-Node: Array Sort Function738462
-Node: Search/Sort Example740698
-Node: Hash Search Function744137
-Node: Tree Search Function752560
-Node: Pattern Matching760098
-Node: Wildcard Matching760903
-Node: Globbing764792
-Node: Calling Glob765663
-Node: Flags for Globbing776465
-Node: More Flags for Globbing780100
-Node: Regular Expressions786485
-Node: POSIX Regexp Compilation787479
-Node: Flags for POSIX Regexps791768
-Node: Matching POSIX Regexps792686
-Node: Regexp Subexpressions795049
-Node: Subexpression Complications797116
-Node: Regexp Cleanup799492
-Node: Word Expansion802095
-Node: Expansion Stages803457
-Node: Calling Wordexp804961
-Node: Flags for Wordexp809256
-Node: Wordexp Example811220
-Node: Tilde Expansion813022
-Node: Variable Substitution814105
-Node: I/O Overview818242
-Node: I/O Concepts819759
-Node: Streams and File Descriptors820915
-Node: File Position824015
-Node: File Names826160
-Node: Directories827055
-Node: File Name Resolution828803
-Node: File Name Errors831737
-Node: File Name Portability833290
-Node: I/O on Streams835255
-Node: Streams837368
-Node: Standard Streams838719
-Node: Opening Streams840521
-Node: Closing Streams851813
-Node: Streams and Threads854591
-Node: Streams and I18N864011
-Node: Simple Output870286
-Node: Character Input877740
-Node: Line Input884480
-Node: Unreading891994
-Node: Unreading Idea892812
-Node: How Unread893630
-Node: Block Input/Output896628
-Node: Formatted Output899885
-Node: Formatted Output Basics901521
-Node: Output Conversion Syntax904021
-Node: Table of Output Conversions909134
-Node: Integer Conversions912153
-Node: Floating-Point Conversions917707
-Node: Other Output Conversions923552
-Node: Formatted Output Functions927376
-Node: Dynamic Output934274
-Node: Variable Arguments Output936409
-Node: Parsing a Template String943637
-Node: Example of Parsing947579
-Node: Customizing Printf949699
-Node: Registering New Conversions951417
-Node: Conversion Specifier Options953734
-Node: Defining the Output Handler957587
-Node: Printf Extension Example960045
-Node: Predefined Printf Handlers962408
-Node: Formatted Input965547
-Node: Formatted Input Basics966635
-Node: Input Conversion Syntax969343
-Node: Table of Input Conversions972724
-Node: Numeric Input Conversions976907
-Node: String Input Conversions981375
-Node: Dynamic String Input986715
-Node: Other Input Conversions987894
-Node: Formatted Input Functions989552
-Node: Variable Arguments Input993153
-Node: EOF and Errors996258
-Node: Error Recovery999559
-Node: Binary Streams1001549
-Node: File Positioning1004084
-Node: Portable Positioning1011917
-Node: Stream Buffering1018070
-Node: Buffering Concepts1019678
-Node: Flushing Buffers1021060
-Node: Controlling Buffering1024653
-Node: Other Kinds of Streams1031039
-Node: String Streams1032223
-Node: Custom Streams1036666
-Node: Streams and Cookies1037339
-Node: Hook Functions1040540
-Node: Formatted Messages1042844
-Node: Printing Formatted Messages1043518
-Node: Adding Severity Classes1050067
-Node: Example1051798
-Node: Low-Level I/O1055011
-Node: Opening and Closing Files1058022
-Node: I/O Primitives1066496
-Node: File Position Primitive1081643
-Node: Descriptors and Streams1089133
-Node: Stream/Descriptor Precautions1092130
-Node: Linked Channels1093343
-Node: Independent Channels1094615
-Node: Cleaning Streams1096529
-Node: Scatter-Gather1098366
-Node: Memory-mapped I/O1101166
-Node: Waiting for I/O1114367
-Node: Synchronizing I/O1123065
-Node: Asynchronous I/O1126732
-Node: Asynchronous Reads/Writes1134803
-Node: Status of AIO Operations1147961
-Node: Synchronizing AIO Operations1151887
-Node: Cancel AIO Operations1158722
-Node: Configuration of AIO1162448
-Node: Control Operations1164758
-Node: Duplicating Descriptors1167548
-Node: Descriptor Flags1171990
-Node: File Status Flags1175403
-Node: Access Modes1176867
-Node: Open-time Flags1179193
-Node: Operating Modes1183969
-Node: Getting File Status Flags1186754
-Node: File Locks1189371
-Node: Interrupt Input1198296
-Node: IOCTLs1200737
-Ref: IOCTLs-Footnote-11202811
-Node: File System Interface1202908
-Node: Working Directory1204440
-Node: Accessing Directories1209960
-Node: Directory Entries1211621
-Node: Opening a Directory1215384
-Node: Reading/Closing Directory1219698
-Node: Simple Directory Lister1226290
-Node: Random Access Directory1227282
-Node: Scanning Directory Content1229157
-Node: Simple Directory Lister Mark II1234281
-Node: Working with Directory Trees1235388
-Node: Hard Links1248150
-Node: Symbolic Links1251072
-Node: Deleting Files1258958
-Node: Renaming Files1262187
-Node: Creating Directories1265902
-Node: File Attributes1267751
-Node: Attribute Meanings1269282
-Node: Reading Attributes1278491
-Node: Testing File Type1283100
-Node: File Owner1288149
-Node: Permission Bits1291992
-Node: Access Permission1297323
-Node: Setting Permissions1298476
-Node: Testing File Access1304065
-Node: File Times1307832
-Node: File Size1314625
-Node: Making Special Files1321410
-Node: Temporary Files1323192
-Node: Pipes and FIFOs1333293
-Node: Creating a Pipe1334879
-Node: Pipe to a Subprocess1338240
-Node: FIFO Special Files1341502
-Node: Pipe Atomicity1343171
-Node: Sockets1344061
-Node: Socket Concepts1346106
-Node: Communication Styles1350353
-Node: Socket Addresses1352217
-Node: Address Formats1354260
-Node: Setting Address1357473
-Node: Reading Address1359294
-Node: Interface Naming1361163
-Node: Local Namespace1364014
-Node: Local Namespace Concepts1364681
-Node: Local Namespace Details1366209
-Node: Local Socket Example1368260
-Node: Internet Namespace1369738
-Node: Internet Address Formats1371972
-Node: Host Addresses1374138
-Node: Abstract Host Addresses1375298
-Node: Host Address Data Type1379820
-Node: Host Address Functions1382967
-Node: Host Names1388191
-Node: Ports1399197
-Node: Services Database1401244
-Node: Byte Order1404918
-Node: Protocols Database1407597
-Node: Inet Example1412001
-Node: Misc Namespaces1414002
-Node: Open/Close Sockets1414755
-Node: Creating a Socket1415260
-Node: Closing a Socket1417044
-Node: Socket Pairs1418669
-Node: Connections1420779
-Node: Connecting1421880
-Node: Listening1424806
-Node: Accepting Connections1426972
-Node: Who is Connected1430205
-Node: Transferring Data1431406
-Node: Sending Data1432522
-Node: Receiving Data1435164
-Node: Socket Data Options1437018
-Node: Byte Stream Example1437899
-Node: Server Example1439922
-Node: Out-of-Band Data1443910
-Node: Datagrams1449777
-Node: Sending Datagrams1450815
-Node: Receiving Datagrams1452851
-Node: Datagram Example1455022
-Node: Example Receiver1457020
-Node: Inetd1459558
-Node: Inetd Servers1460376
-Node: Configuring Inetd1461631
-Node: Socket Options1464313
-Node: Socket Option Functions1465030
-Node: Socket-Level Options1466782
-Node: Networks Database1470429
-Node: Low-Level Terminal Interface1474151
-Node: Is It a Terminal1475623
-Node: I/O Queues1477854
-Node: Canonical or Not1479818
-Node: Terminal Modes1481671
-Node: Mode Data Types1483247
-Node: Mode Functions1485090
-Node: Setting Modes1489211
-Node: Input Modes1491216
-Node: Output Modes1496522
-Node: Control Modes1498250
-Node: Local Modes1502372
-Node: Line Speed1508782
-Node: Special Characters1513413
-Node: Editing Characters1515338
-Node: Signal Characters1519716
-Node: Start/Stop Characters1522603
-Node: Other Special1524490
-Node: Noncanonical Input1526511
-Node: BSD Terminal Modes1531430
-Node: Line Control1533091
-Node: Noncanon Example1538240
-Node: Pseudo-Terminals1540420
-Node: Allocation1541339
-Node: Pseudo-Terminal Pairs1546675
-Node: Syslog1549512
-Node: Overview of Syslog1550464
-Node: Submitting Syslog Messages1554659
-Node: openlog1555484
-Node: syslog; vsyslog1560575
-Node: closelog1565110
-Node: setlogmask1566367
-Node: Syslog Example1568326
-Node: Mathematics1568980
-Node: Mathematical Constants1570707
-Node: Trig Functions1572722
-Node: Inverse Trig Functions1577094
-Node: Exponents and Logarithms1581533
-Node: Hyperbolic Functions1591450
-Node: Special Functions1596577
-Node: Errors in Math Functions1602236
-Node: Pseudo-Random Numbers1688794
-Node: ISO Random1691044
-Node: BSD Random1693284
-Node: SVID Random1698709
-Node: FP Function Optimizations1714041
-Node: Arithmetic1716135
-Node: Integers1717417
-Node: Integer Division1720446
-Node: Floating Point Numbers1724496
-Node: Floating Point Classes1726244
-Node: Floating Point Errors1730978
-Node: FP Exceptions1731485
-Node: Infinity and NaN1735917
-Node: Status bit operations1738869
-Node: Math Error Reporting1743471
-Node: Rounding1746356
-Node: Control Functions1749994
-Node: Arithmetic Functions1755428
-Node: Absolute Value1756303
-Node: Normalization Functions1758645
-Node: Rounding Functions1762483
-Node: Remainder Functions1767899
-Node: FP Bit Twiddling1770323
-Node: FP Comparison Functions1773901
-Node: Misc FP Arithmetic1777151
-Node: Complex Numbers1780264
-Node: Operations on Complex1781978
-Node: Parsing of Numbers1784783
-Node: Parsing of Integers1785484
-Node: Parsing of Floats1797880
-Node: System V Number Conversion1803455
-Node: Date and Time1810024
-Node: Time Basics1810757
-Node: Elapsed Time1812658
-Node: Processor And CPU Time1816294
-Node: CPU Time1818189
-Node: Processor Time1819980
-Node: Calendar Time1822641
-Node: Simple Calendar Time1824587
-Node: High-Resolution Calendar1827187
-Node: Broken-down Time1832907
-Node: High Accuracy Clock1841824
-Node: Formatting Calendar Time1849446
-Node: Parsing Date and Time1866302
-Node: Low-Level Time String Parsing1867157
-Node: General Time String Parsing1880880
-Node: TZ Variable1888289
-Node: Time Zone Functions1895633
-Node: Time Functions Example1898615
-Node: Setting an Alarm1899700
-Node: Sleeping1905758
-Node: Resource Usage And Limitation1910565
-Node: Resource Usage1911245
-Node: Limits on Resources1916902
-Node: Priority1926694
-Node: Absolute Priority1929134
-Node: Realtime Scheduling1934251
-Node: Basic Scheduling Functions1937709
-Node: Traditional Scheduling1946341
-Node: Traditional Scheduling Intro1946925
-Node: Traditional Scheduling Functions1951205
-Node: CPU Affinity1955394
-Node: Memory Resources1961946
-Node: Memory Subsystem1962804
-Node: Query Memory Parameters1965197
-Node: Processor Resources1969171
-Node: Non-Local Exits1971590
-Node: Non-Local Intro1972303
-Node: Non-Local Details1976017
-Node: Non-Local Exits and Signals1979327
-Node: System V contexts1981086
-Node: Signal Handling1994481
-Node: Concepts of Signals1996518
-Node: Kinds of Signals1997089
-Node: Signal Generation1998495
-Node: Delivery of Signal2000773
-Node: Standard Signals2003638
-Node: Program Error Signals2005239
-Node: Termination Signals2012729
-Node: Alarm Signals2016588
-Node: Asynchronous I/O Signals2017843
-Node: Job Control Signals2019044
-Node: Operation Error Signals2023676
-Node: Miscellaneous Signals2025632
-Node: Signal Messages2027343
-Node: Signal Actions2029533
-Node: Basic Signal Handling2030487
-Node: Advanced Signal Handling2036834
-Node: Signal and Sigaction2039910
-Node: Sigaction Function Example2041670
-Node: Flags for Sigaction2043967
-Node: Initial Signal Actions2046359
-Node: Defining Handlers2047741
-Node: Handler Returns2049933
-Node: Termination in Handler2051960
-Node: Longjmp in Handler2053394
-Node: Signals in Handler2055490
-Node: Merged Signals2057621
-Node: Nonreentrancy2063290
-Node: Atomic Data Access2068707
-Node: Non-atomic Example2069764
-Node: Atomic Types2071550
-Node: Atomic Usage2072539
-Node: Interrupted Primitives2074024
-Node: Generating Signals2077504
-Node: Signaling Yourself2078104
-Node: Signaling Another Process2080246
-Node: Permission for kill2083811
-Node: Kill Example2085618
-Node: Blocking Signals2087927
-Node: Why Block2089706
-Node: Signal Sets2091253
-Node: Process Signal Mask2094735
-Node: Testing for Delivery2098217
-Node: Blocking for Handler2099461
-Node: Checking for Pending Signals2101876
-Node: Remembering a Signal2103993
-Node: Waiting for a Signal2107538
-Node: Using Pause2108090
-Node: Pause Problems2109872
-Node: Sigsuspend2111597
-Node: Signal Stack2114441
-Node: BSD Signal Handling2119990
-Node: BSD Handler2121275
-Node: Blocking in BSD2123929
-Node: Program Basics2125850
-Node: Program Arguments2127918
-Node: Argument Syntax2129924
-Node: Parsing Program Arguments2132606
-Node: Getopt2133721
-Node: Using Getopt2134366
-Node: Example of Getopt2138672
-Node: Getopt Long Options2141517
-Node: Getopt Long Option Example2147081
-Node: Argp2150105
-Node: Argp Global Variables2153630
-Node: Argp Parsers2155677
-Node: Argp Option Vectors2159063
-Node: Argp Option Flags2162290
-Node: Argp Parser Functions2164351
-Node: Argp Special Keys2167055
-Node: Argp Parsing State2172356
-Node: Argp Helper Functions2175935
-Node: Argp Children2179578
-Node: Argp Flags2181672
-Node: Argp Help Filtering2183961
-Node: Argp Help Filter Keys2185208
-Node: Argp Help2186136
-Node: Argp Help Flags2187485
-Node: Argp Examples2189848
-Node: Argp Example 12190331
-Node: Argp Example 22191105
-Node: Argp Example 32193988
-Node: Argp Example 42200873
-Node: Argp User Customization2208435
-Node: Suboptions2210176
-Node: Suboptions Example2212217
-Node: Environment Variables2214364
-Node: Environment Access2216240
-Node: Standard Environment2222729
-Node: Auxiliary Vector2226913
-Node: System Calls2228399
-Node: Program Termination2231977
-Node: Normal Termination2233193
-Node: Exit Status2234726
-Node: Cleanups on Exit2238100
-Node: Aborting a Program2240141
-Node: Termination Internals2241166
-Node: Processes2243535
-Node: Running a Command2245559
-Node: Process Creation Concepts2247711
-Node: Process Identification2249727
-Node: Creating a Process2250839
-Node: Executing a File2254676
-Node: Process Completion2262417
-Node: Process Completion Status2268960
-Node: BSD Wait Functions2271228
-Node: Process Creation Example2273196
-Node: Job Control2275444
-Node: Concepts of Job Control2276725
-Node: Job Control is Optional2280086
-Node: Controlling Terminal2281139
-Node: Access to the Terminal2282054
-Node: Orphaned Process Groups2283664
-Node: Implementing a Shell2284662
-Node: Data Structures2285552
-Node: Initializing the Shell2288186
-Node: Launching Jobs2291878
-Node: Foreground and Background2299297
-Node: Stopped and Terminated Jobs2302397
-Node: Continuing Stopped Jobs2307532
-Node: Missing Pieces2309155
-Node: Functions for Job Control2310790
-Node: Identifying the Terminal2311277
-Node: Process Group Functions2312954
-Node: Terminal Access Functions2317616
-Node: Name Service Switch2321370
-Node: NSS Basics2322668
-Node: NSS Configuration File2324268
-Node: Services in the NSS configuration2325958
-Node: Actions in the NSS configuration2327257
-Node: Notes on NSS Configuration File2330429
-Node: NSS Module Internals2332317
-Node: NSS Module Names2333020
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-Node: Extending NSS2340110
-Node: Adding another Service to NSS2341048
-Node: NSS Module Function Internals2343290
-Node: Users and Groups2348205
-Node: User and Group IDs2350819
-Node: Process Persona2351734
-Node: Why Change Persona2353426
-Node: How Change Persona2355314
-Node: Reading Persona2357208
-Node: Setting User ID2359933
-Node: Setting Groups2363113
-Node: Enable/Disable Setuid2369489
-Node: Setuid Program Example2371531
-Node: Tips for Setuid2374927
-Node: Who Logged In2377451
-Node: User Accounting Database2380176
-Node: Manipulating the Database2381369
-Node: XPG Functions2395190
-Node: Logging In and Out2400788
-Node: User Database2403457
-Node: User Data Structure2404128
-Node: Lookup User2405401
-Node: Scanning All Users2408586
-Node: Writing a User Entry2412459
-Node: Group Database2413597
-Node: Group Data Structure2414182
-Node: Lookup Group2414961
-Node: Scanning All Groups2418083
-Node: Database Example2422029
-Node: Netgroup Database2424206
-Node: Netgroup Data2424629
-Node: Lookup Netgroup2426170
-Node: Netgroup Membership2430270
-Node: System Management2431777
-Node: Host Identification2432711
-Node: Platform Type2439849
-Node: Filesystem Handling2443251
-Node: Mount Information2444758
-Node: fstab2446946
-Node: mtab2453525
-Node: Other Mount Information2463613
-Node: Mount-Unmount-Remount2464142
-Node: System Parameters2474405
-Node: System Configuration2480045
-Node: General Limits2481619
-Node: System Options2485273
-Node: Version Supported2488619
-Node: Sysconf2490226
-Node: Sysconf Definition2490869
-Node: Constants for Sysconf2491673
-Node: Examples of Sysconf2504660
-Node: Minimums2505664
-Node: Limits for Files2508382
-Node: Options for Files2511729
-Node: File Minimums2514032
-Node: Pathconf2516259
-Node: Utility Limits2519916
-Node: Utility Minimums2521863
-Node: String Parameters2523627
-Node: Cryptographic Functions2527614
-Node: Legal Problems2529942
-Node: getpass2532217
-Node: crypt2534505
-Node: DES Encryption2539500
-Node: Debugging Support2546418
-Node: Backtraces2547063
-Node: POSIX Threads2552164
-Node: Thread-specific Data2552574
-Node: Non-POSIX Extensions2554359
-Node: Default Thread Attributes2554796
-Node: Internal Probes2556068
-Node: Memory Allocation Probes2556883
-Node: Mathematical Function Probes2566967
-Node: Language Features2573676
-Node: Consistency Checking2574623
-Node: Variadic Functions2579418
-Node: Why Variadic2580495
-Node: How Variadic2582468
-Node: Variadic Prototypes2583700
-Node: Receiving Arguments2584854
-Node: How Many Arguments2587538
-Node: Calling Variadics2589213
-Node: Argument Macros2591326
-Node: Variadic Example2594688
-Node: Null Pointer Constant2595815
-Node: Important Data Types2596904
-Node: Data Type Measurements2598756
-Node: Width of Type2599618
-Node: Range of Type2600532
-Node: Floating Type Macros2604095
-Node: Floating Point Concepts2605362
-Node: Floating Point Parameters2609107
-Node: IEEE Floating Point2616061
-Node: Structure Measurement2617827
-Node: Library Summary2618618
-Node: Installation2824231
-Node: Configuring and compiling2825366
-Node: Running make install2836996
-Node: Tools for Compilation2840680
-Node: Linux2843282
-Node: Reporting Bugs2845711
-Node: Maintenance2848062
-Node: Source Layout2848463
-Node: Adding Platform-specific2852536
-Node: Porting2855574
-Node: Hierarchy Conventions2863306
-Node: Porting to Unix2868363
-Node: Platform2870387
-Node: PowerPC2870698
-Node: Contributors2874590
-Node: Free Manuals2886666
-Node: Copying2891605
-Node: Documentation License2919777
-Node: Concept Index2944935
-Node: Type Index3049482
-Node: Function Index3067919
-Node: Variable Index3197377
-Node: File Index3304512
+Node: Top64085
+Node: Introduction123894
+Node: Getting Started125243
+Node: Standards and Portability126708
+Node: ISO C128163
+Node: POSIX129690
+Node: POSIX Safety Concepts131783
+Node: Unsafe Features137490
+Node: Conditionally Safe Features142027
+Node: Other Safety Remarks153369
+Node: Berkeley Unix162100
+Node: SVID162873
+Node: XPG163880
+Node: Using the Library164829
+Node: Header Files165557
+Node: Macro Definitions169506
+Node: Reserved Names171855
+Node: Feature Test Macros176559
+Node: Roadmap to the Manual186179
+Node: Error Reporting193507
+Node: Checking for Errors194424
+Node: Error Codes198668
+Node: Error Messages218396
+Node: Memory234439
+Node: Memory Concepts235297
+Node: Memory Allocation240975
+Node: Memory Allocation and C241881
+Node: Unconstrained Allocation245452
+Node: Basic Allocation246881
+Node: Malloc Examples248703
+Node: Freeing after Malloc250659
+Node: Changing Block Size252700
+Node: Allocating Cleared Space255416
+Node: Efficiency and Malloc256546
+Node: Aligned Memory Blocks257658
+Node: Malloc Tunable Parameters261661
+Node: Heap Consistency Checking264083
+Node: Hooks for Malloc269480
+Node: Statistics of Malloc275777
+Node: Summary of Malloc277894
+Node: Allocation Debugging280511
+Node: Tracing malloc281623
+Node: Using the Memory Debugger283846
+Node: Tips for the Memory Debugger285739
+Node: Interpreting the traces287056
+Node: Obstacks290594
+Node: Creating Obstacks292217
+Node: Preparing for Obstacks294130
+Node: Allocation in an Obstack296989
+Node: Freeing Obstack Objects299761
+Node: Obstack Functions365308
+Node: Growing Objects367551
+Node: Extra Fast Growing372742
+Node: Status of an Obstack376912
+Node: Obstacks Data Alignment378645
+Node: Obstack Chunks380620
+Node: Summary of Obstacks383078
+Node: Variable Size Automatic386508
+Node: Alloca Example388130
+Node: Advantages of Alloca389264
+Node: Disadvantages of Alloca391164
+Node: GNU C Variable-Size Arrays391920
+Node: Resizing the Data Segment393089
+Node: Locking Pages395385
+Node: Why Lock Pages396127
+Node: Locked Memory Details397762
+Node: Page Lock Functions400030
+Node: Character Handling406262
+Node: Classification of Characters407718
+Node: Case Conversion412759
+Node: Classification of Wide Characters415093
+Node: Using Wide Char Classes424166
+Node: Wide Character Case Conversion426482
+Node: String and Array Utilities429555
+Node: Representation of Strings431620
+Node: String/Array Conventions437147
+Node: String Length440084
+Node: Copying and Concatenation444246
+Node: String/Array Comparison472132
+Node: Collation Functions483359
+Node: Search Functions494042
+Node: Finding Tokens in a String508430
+Node: strfry520527
+Node: Trivial Encryption521647
+Node: Encode Binary Data523198
+Node: Argz and Envz Vectors528062
+Node: Argz Functions528669
+Node: Envz Functions536410
+Node: Character Set Handling539938
+Node: Extended Char Intro541091
+Node: Charset Function Overview554207
+Node: Restartable multibyte conversion555175
+Node: Selecting the Conversion557289
+Node: Keeping the state559670
+Node: Converting a Character562991
+Node: Converting Strings579749
+Node: Multibyte Conversion Example590517
+Node: Non-reentrant Conversion593468
+Node: Non-reentrant Character Conversion595157
+Node: Non-reentrant String Conversion664384
+Node: Shift State667654
+Node: Generic Charset Conversion670316
+Node: Generic Conversion Interface673508
+Node: iconv Examples683845
+Node: Other iconv Implementations689143
+Node: glibc iconv Implementation694543
+Node: Locales734107
+Node: Effects of Locale735778
+Node: Choosing Locale737747
+Node: Locale Categories739126
+Node: Setting the Locale741646
+Node: Standard Locales746679
+Node: Locale Information747973
+Node: The Lame Way to Locale Data749695
+Node: General Numeric751691
+Node: Currency Symbol754683
+Node: Sign of Money Amount758884
+Node: The Elegant and Fast Way761033
+Node: Formatting Numbers773295
+Node: Yes-or-No Questions782834
+Node: Message Translation785019
+Node: Message catalogs a la X/Open787059
+Node: The catgets Functions788362
+Node: The message catalog files797706
+Node: The gencat program804445
+Node: Common Usage807585
+Node: The Uniforum approach814748
+Node: Message catalogs with gettext816247
+Node: Translation with gettext817291
+Node: Locating gettext catalog824031
+Node: Advanced gettext functions831117
+Ref: Advanced gettext functions-Footnote-1842276
+Node: Charset conversion in gettext842368
+Node: GUI program problems844971
+Node: Using gettextized software850518
+Node: Helper programs for gettext858839
+Node: Searching and Sorting860615
+Node: Comparison Functions861531
+Node: Array Search Function862748
+Node: Array Sort Function866365
+Node: Search/Sort Example868594
+Node: Hash Search Function872033
+Node: Tree Search Function880456
+Node: Pattern Matching887992
+Node: Wildcard Matching888797
+Node: Globbing892691
+Node: Calling Glob893562
+Node: Flags for Globbing968444
+Node: More Flags for Globbing972081
+Node: Regular Expressions978465
+Node: POSIX Regexp Compilation979459
+Node: Flags for POSIX Regexps983742
+Node: Matching POSIX Regexps984660
+Node: Regexp Subexpressions987022
+Node: Subexpression Complications989091
+Node: Regexp Cleanup991464
+Node: Word Expansion994066
+Node: Expansion Stages995428
+Node: Calling Wordexp996932
+Node: Flags for Wordexp1001234
+Node: Wordexp Example1003198
+Node: Tilde Expansion1005000
+Node: Variable Substitution1006083
+Node: I/O Overview1010219
+Node: I/O Concepts1011736
+Node: Streams and File Descriptors1012890
+Node: File Position1015990
+Node: File Names1018129
+Node: Directories1019022
+Node: File Name Resolution1020770
+Node: File Name Errors1023704
+Node: File Name Portability1025257
+Node: I/O on Streams1027223
+Node: Streams1029336
+Node: Standard Streams1030679
+Node: Opening Streams1032470
+Node: Closing Streams1043769
+Node: Streams and Threads1046547
+Node: Streams and I18N1055971
+Node: Simple Output1062246
+Node: Character Input1069699
+Node: Line Input1076437
+Node: Unreading1083949
+Node: Unreading Idea1084765
+Node: How Unread1085582
+Node: Block Input/Output1088580
+Node: Formatted Output1091833
+Node: Formatted Output Basics1093469
+Node: Output Conversion Syntax1095969
+Node: Table of Output Conversions1101074
+Node: Integer Conversions1104093
+Node: Floating-Point Conversions1109637
+Node: Other Output Conversions1115482
+Node: Formatted Output Functions1119305
+Node: Dynamic Output1126203
+Node: Variable Arguments Output1128339
+Node: Parsing a Template String1135550
+Node: Example of Parsing1139492
+Node: Customizing Printf1141612
+Node: Registering New Conversions1143330
+Node: Conversion Specifier Options1145645
+Node: Defining the Output Handler1149511
+Node: Printf Extension Example1151969
+Node: Predefined Printf Handlers1154332
+Node: Formatted Input1157471
+Node: Formatted Input Basics1158559
+Node: Input Conversion Syntax1161257
+Node: Table of Input Conversions1164633
+Node: Numeric Input Conversions1168815
+Node: String Input Conversions1173283
+Node: Dynamic String Input1178623
+Node: Other Input Conversions1179802
+Node: Formatted Input Functions1181461
+Node: Variable Arguments Input1185060
+Node: EOF and Errors1188165
+Node: Error Recovery1191461
+Node: Binary Streams1193451
+Node: File Positioning1195984
+Node: Portable Positioning1267893
+Node: Stream Buffering1274045
+Node: Buffering Concepts1275653
+Node: Flushing Buffers1277030
+Node: Controlling Buffering1280621
+Node: Other Kinds of Streams1287004
+Node: String Streams1288187
+Node: Custom Streams1292629
+Node: Streams and Cookies1293302
+Node: Hook Functions1296504
+Node: Formatted Messages1298808
+Node: Printing Formatted Messages1299482
+Node: Adding Severity Classes1306026
+Node: Example1307757
+Node: Low-Level I/O1310970
+Node: Opening and Closing Files1313981
+Node: I/O Primitives1322462
+Node: File Position Primitive1337608
+Node: Descriptors and Streams1345098
+Node: Stream/Descriptor Precautions1348083
+Node: Linked Channels1349296
+Node: Independent Channels1350568
+Node: Cleaning Streams1352482
+Node: Scatter-Gather1354320
+Node: Memory-mapped I/O1357116
+Node: Waiting for I/O1370349
+Node: Synchronizing I/O1379043
+Node: Asynchronous I/O1382709
+Node: Asynchronous Reads/Writes1390785
+Node: Status of AIO Operations1403924
+Node: Synchronizing AIO Operations1407850
+Node: Cancel AIO Operations1414677
+Node: Configuration of AIO1418403
+Node: Control Operations1420714
+Node: Duplicating Descriptors1423512
+Node: Descriptor Flags1427955
+Node: File Status Flags1431367
+Node: Access Modes1432829
+Node: Open-time Flags1435155
+Node: Operating Modes1439921
+Node: Getting File Status Flags1442709
+Node: File Locks1445327
+Node: Interrupt Input1454264
+Node: IOCTLs1456708
+Ref: IOCTLs-Footnote-11458782
+Node: File System Interface1458879
+Node: Working Directory1460409
+Node: Accessing Directories1465933
+Node: Directory Entries1467594
+Node: Opening a Directory1471357
+Node: Reading/Closing Directory1475679
+Node: Simple Directory Lister1482267
+Node: Random Access Directory1483259
+Node: Scanning Directory Content1485134
+Node: Simple Directory Lister Mark II1490258
+Node: Working with Directory Trees1491365
+Node: Hard Links1568219
+Node: Symbolic Links1571138
+Node: Deleting Files1579033
+Node: Renaming Files1582265
+Node: Creating Directories1585993
+Node: File Attributes1587845
+Node: Attribute Meanings1589376
+Node: Reading Attributes1598611
+Node: Testing File Type1603222
+Node: File Owner1608267
+Node: Permission Bits1612116
+Node: Access Permission1617447
+Node: Setting Permissions1618600
+Node: Testing File Access1624195
+Node: File Times1627962
+Node: File Size1634732
+Node: Making Special Files1641524
+Node: Temporary Files1643308
+Node: Pipes and FIFOs1653401
+Node: Creating a Pipe1654987
+Node: Pipe to a Subprocess1658348
+Node: FIFO Special Files1661610
+Node: Pipe Atomicity1663279
+Node: Sockets1664169
+Node: Socket Concepts1666213
+Node: Communication Styles1670459
+Node: Socket Addresses1672321
+Node: Address Formats1674364
+Node: Setting Address1677580
+Node: Reading Address1679407
+Node: Interface Naming1681279
+Node: Local Namespace1684131
+Node: Local Namespace Concepts1684798
+Node: Local Namespace Details1686326
+Node: Local Socket Example1688376
+Node: Internet Namespace1689854
+Node: Internet Address Formats1692086
+Node: Host Addresses1694256
+Node: Abstract Host Addresses1695416
+Node: Host Address Data Type1699942
+Node: Host Address Functions1703088
+Node: Host Names1708316
+Node: Ports1719325
+Node: Services Database1721372
+Node: Byte Order1725049
+Node: Protocols Database1727726
+Node: Inet Example1732131
+Node: Misc Namespaces1734132
+Node: Open/Close Sockets1734885
+Node: Creating a Socket1735390
+Node: Closing a Socket1737177
+Node: Socket Pairs1738807
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+Node: Connecting1742022
+Node: Listening1744960
+Node: Accepting Connections1747129
+Node: Who is Connected1750365
+Node: Transferring Data1751570
+Node: Sending Data1752686
+Node: Receiving Data1755336
+Node: Socket Data Options1757195
+Node: Byte Stream Example1758076
+Node: Server Example1760099
+Node: Out-of-Band Data1764087
+Node: Datagrams1769954
+Node: Sending Datagrams1770992
+Node: Receiving Datagrams1773029
+Node: Datagram Example1775200
+Node: Example Receiver1777199
+Node: Inetd1779738
+Node: Inetd Servers1780556
+Node: Configuring Inetd1781811
+Node: Socket Options1784493
+Node: Socket Option Functions1785210
+Node: Socket-Level Options1786965
+Node: Networks Database1790614
+Node: Low-Level Terminal Interface1794340
+Node: Is It a Terminal1795812
+Node: I/O Queues1798046
+Node: Canonical or Not1864094
+Node: Terminal Modes1865947
+Node: Mode Data Types1867523
+Node: Mode Functions1869371
+Node: Setting Modes1873494
+Node: Input Modes1875499
+Node: Output Modes1880799
+Node: Control Modes1882527
+Node: Local Modes1886645
+Node: Line Speed1893051
+Node: Special Characters1897685
+Node: Editing Characters1899610
+Node: Signal Characters1903989
+Node: Start/Stop Characters1906876
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+Node: Noncanonical Input1910779
+Node: BSD Terminal Modes1915697
+Node: Line Control1917359
+Node: Noncanon Example1922529
+Node: Pseudo-Terminals1924709
+Node: Allocation1925628
+Node: Pseudo-Terminal Pairs1930962
+Node: Syslog1933791
+Node: Overview of Syslog1934743
+Node: Submitting Syslog Messages1938934
+Node: openlog1939759
+Node: syslog; vsyslog1944853
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+Node: setlogmask1950646
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+Node: Mathematics1953259
+Node: Mathematical Constants1954984
+Node: Trig Functions1956987
+Node: Inverse Trig Functions1961359
+Node: Exponents and Logarithms1965793
+Node: Hyperbolic Functions1975713
+Node: Special Functions1980840
+Node: Errors in Math Functions1986496
+Node: Pseudo-Random Numbers2073050
+Node: ISO Random2075299
+Node: BSD Random2077537
+Node: SVID Random2082959
+Node: FP Function Optimizations2098287
+Node: Arithmetic2164466
+Node: Integers2165748
+Node: Integer Division2168749
+Node: Floating Point Numbers2172805
+Node: Floating Point Classes2174553
+Node: Floating Point Errors2179280
+Node: FP Exceptions2179787
+Node: Infinity and NaN2184203
+Node: Status bit operations2187147
+Node: Math Error Reporting2191739
+Node: Rounding2194620
+Node: Control Functions2198258
+Node: Arithmetic Functions2203690
+Node: Absolute Value2204565
+Node: Normalization Functions2206906
+Node: Rounding Functions2210744
+Node: Remainder Functions2216161
+Node: FP Bit Twiddling2218580
+Node: FP Comparison Functions2222153
+Node: Misc FP Arithmetic2225402
+Node: Complex Numbers2228515
+Node: Operations on Complex2230224
+Node: Parsing of Numbers2233027
+Node: Parsing of Integers2233728
+Node: Parsing of Floats2246121
+Node: System V Number Conversion2251696
+Node: Date and Time2258266
+Node: Time Basics2258997
+Node: Elapsed Time2260882
+Node: Processor And CPU Time2264521
+Node: CPU Time2266413
+Node: Processor Time2268202
+Node: Calendar Time2270864
+Node: Simple Calendar Time2272804
+Node: High-Resolution Calendar2275405
+Node: Broken-down Time2281117
+Node: High Accuracy Clock2290030
+Node: Formatting Calendar Time2297675
+Node: Parsing Date and Time2314559
+Node: Low-Level Time String Parsing2315414
+Node: General Time String Parsing2329194
+Node: TZ Variable2336597
+Node: Time Zone Functions2343939
+Node: Time Functions Example2346920
+Node: Setting an Alarm2348005
+Node: Sleeping2354056
+Node: Resource Usage And Limitation2358860
+Node: Resource Usage2359541
+Node: Limits on Resources2365216
+Node: Priority2375006
+Node: Absolute Priority2377446
+Node: Realtime Scheduling2382559
+Node: Basic Scheduling Functions2386017
+Node: Traditional Scheduling2394644
+Node: Traditional Scheduling Intro2395228
+Node: Traditional Scheduling Functions2399507
+Node: CPU Affinity2467785
+Node: Memory Resources2474342
+Node: Memory Subsystem2475200
+Node: Query Memory Parameters2477591
+Node: Processor Resources2481566
+Node: Non-Local Exits2483986
+Node: Non-Local Intro2484699
+Node: Non-Local Details2488414
+Node: Non-Local Exits and Signals2491723
+Node: System V contexts2493480
+Node: Signal Handling2506882
+Node: Concepts of Signals2508919
+Node: Kinds of Signals2509490
+Node: Signal Generation2510896
+Node: Delivery of Signal2513174
+Node: Standard Signals2516038
+Node: Program Error Signals2517639
+Node: Termination Signals2525116
+Node: Alarm Signals2528970
+Node: Asynchronous I/O Signals2530216
+Node: Job Control Signals2531417
+Node: Operation Error Signals2536036
+Node: Miscellaneous Signals2537992
+Node: Signal Messages2539703
+Node: Signal Actions2541888
+Node: Basic Signal Handling2542842
+Node: Advanced Signal Handling2549184
+Node: Signal and Sigaction2552257
+Node: Sigaction Function Example2554017
+Node: Flags for Sigaction2556314
+Node: Initial Signal Actions2558702
+Node: Defining Handlers2560082
+Node: Handler Returns2562275
+Node: Termination in Handler2564303
+Node: Longjmp in Handler2565738
+Node: Signals in Handler2567834
+Node: Merged Signals2569965
+Node: Nonreentrancy2575634
+Node: Atomic Data Access2581051
+Node: Non-atomic Example2582108
+Node: Atomic Types2583894
+Node: Atomic Usage2584883
+Node: Interrupted Primitives2586368
+Node: Generating Signals2589848
+Node: Signaling Yourself2590448
+Node: Signaling Another Process2592588
+Node: Permission for kill2596150
+Node: Kill Example2597957
+Node: Blocking Signals2600266
+Node: Why Block2602045
+Node: Signal Sets2603592
+Node: Process Signal Mask2607072
+Node: Testing for Delivery2610556
+Node: Blocking for Handler2611801
+Node: Checking for Pending Signals2614216
+Node: Remembering a Signal2616331
+Node: Waiting for a Signal2619876
+Node: Using Pause2620428
+Node: Pause Problems2622210
+Node: Sigsuspend2623935
+Node: Signal Stack2626779
+Node: BSD Signal Handling2632338
+Node: BSD Handler2633621
+Node: Blocking in BSD2636276
+Node: Program Basics2638196
+Node: Program Arguments2640264
+Node: Argument Syntax2642270
+Node: Parsing Program Arguments2644954
+Node: Getopt2646069
+Node: Using Getopt2646714
+Node: Example of Getopt2651012
+Node: Getopt Long Options2653857
+Node: Getopt Long Option Example2659418
+Node: Argp2662442
+Node: Argp Global Variables2665966
+Node: Argp Parsers2668013
+Node: Argp Option Vectors2671405
+Node: Argp Option Flags2674627
+Node: Argp Parser Functions2676688
+Node: Argp Special Keys2679392
+Node: Argp Parsing State2684688
+Node: Argp Helper Functions2688281
+Node: Argp Children2691924
+Node: Argp Flags2694021
+Node: Argp Help Filtering2696310
+Node: Argp Help Filter Keys2697557
+Node: Argp Help2698485
+Node: Argp Help Flags2699834
+Node: Argp Examples2766282
+Node: Argp Example 12766765
+Node: Argp Example 22767539
+Node: Argp Example 32770422
+Node: Argp Example 42777307
+Node: Argp User Customization2784869
+Node: Suboptions2786609
+Node: Suboptions Example2788650
+Node: Environment Variables2790797
+Node: Environment Access2792673
+Node: Standard Environment2799156
+Node: Auxiliary Vector2803354
+Node: System Calls2804840
+Node: Program Termination2808417
+Node: Normal Termination2809633
+Node: Exit Status2811167
+Node: Cleanups on Exit2814538
+Node: Aborting a Program2816573
+Node: Termination Internals2817596
+Node: Processes2819958
+Node: Running a Command2821982
+Node: Process Creation Concepts2824134
+Node: Process Identification2826151
+Node: Creating a Process2827259
+Node: Executing a File2831095
+Node: Process Completion2838835
+Node: Process Completion Status2845381
+Node: BSD Wait Functions2847647
+Node: Process Creation Example2849617
+Node: Job Control2851865
+Node: Concepts of Job Control2853145
+Node: Job Control is Optional2856507
+Node: Controlling Terminal2857560
+Node: Access to the Terminal2858475
+Node: Orphaned Process Groups2860085
+Node: Implementing a Shell2861083
+Node: Data Structures2861973
+Node: Initializing the Shell2864607
+Node: Launching Jobs2868299
+Node: Foreground and Background2875718
+Node: Stopped and Terminated Jobs2878817
+Node: Continuing Stopped Jobs2883952
+Node: Missing Pieces2885575
+Node: Functions for Job Control2887210
+Node: Identifying the Terminal2887697
+Node: Process Group Functions2889372
+Node: Terminal Access Functions2894040
+Node: Name Service Switch2897801
+Node: NSS Basics2899099
+Node: NSS Configuration File2900687
+Node: Services in the NSS configuration2902376
+Node: Actions in the NSS configuration2903675
+Node: Notes on NSS Configuration File2906847
+Node: NSS Module Internals2908735
+Node: NSS Module Names2909438
+Ref: NSS Module Names-Footnote-12911485
+Ref: NSS Module Names-Footnote-22911639
+Node: NSS Modules Interface2911817
+Node: Extending NSS2916556
+Node: Adding another Service to NSS2917494
+Node: NSS Module Function Internals2919736
+Node: Users and Groups2924644
+Node: User and Group IDs2927256
+Node: Process Persona2928169
+Node: Why Change Persona2929861
+Node: How Change Persona2931749
+Node: Reading Persona2933642
+Node: Setting User ID2936365
+Node: Setting Groups2939544
+Node: Enable/Disable Setuid2945913
+Node: Setuid Program Example2947955
+Node: Tips for Setuid2951347
+Node: Who Logged In2953869
+Node: User Accounting Database2956592
+Node: Manipulating the Database2957785
+Node: XPG Functions2971606
+Node: Logging In and Out2977193
+Node: User Database2979860
+Node: User Data Structure2980531
+Node: Lookup User2981810
+Node: Scanning All Users2984996
+Node: Writing a User Entry2988868
+Node: Group Database2990005
+Node: Group Data Structure2990590
+Node: Lookup Group2991371
+Node: Scanning All Groups2994489
+Node: Database Example2998435
+Node: Netgroup Database3064697
+Node: Netgroup Data3065120
+Node: Lookup Netgroup3066651
+Node: Netgroup Membership3070751
+Node: System Management3072257
+Node: Host Identification3073191
+Node: Platform Type3080313
+Node: Filesystem Handling3083719
+Node: Mount Information3085225
+Node: fstab3087412
+Node: mtab3093982
+Node: Other Mount Information3104048
+Node: Mount-Unmount-Remount3104577
+Node: System Parameters3114850
+Node: System Configuration3120483
+Node: General Limits3122057
+Node: System Options3125706
+Node: Version Supported3129052
+Node: Sysconf3130659
+Node: Sysconf Definition3131302
+Node: Constants for Sysconf3132107
+Node: Examples of Sysconf3145092
+Node: Minimums3146096
+Node: Limits for Files3148813
+Node: Options for Files3152160
+Node: File Minimums3154463
+Node: Pathconf3156690
+Node: Utility Limits3160350
+Node: Utility Minimums3162297
+Node: String Parameters3164061
+Node: Cryptographic Functions3168044
+Node: Legal Problems3170372
+Node: getpass3172647
+Node: crypt3174935
+Node: DES Encryption3179931
+Node: Debugging Support3186856
+Node: Backtraces3187501
+Node: POSIX Threads3192590
+Node: Thread-specific Data3193000
+Node: Non-POSIX Extensions3194785
+Node: Default Thread Attributes3195222
+Node: Internal Probes3196495
+Node: Memory Allocation Probes3197310
+Node: Mathematical Function Probes3207389
+Node: Language Features3214097
+Node: Consistency Checking3215042
+Node: Variadic Functions3219832
+Node: Why Variadic3220909
+Node: How Variadic3222883
+Node: Variadic Prototypes3224115
+Node: Receiving Arguments3225268
+Node: How Many Arguments3227953
+Node: Calling Variadics3229628
+Node: Argument Macros3231742
+Node: Variadic Example3235091
+Node: Null Pointer Constant3236218
+Node: Important Data Types3237307
+Node: Data Type Measurements3239157
+Node: Width of Type3240019
+Node: Range of Type3240933
+Node: Floating Type Macros3244509
+Node: Floating Point Concepts3245776
+Node: Floating Point Parameters3249521
+Node: IEEE Floating Point3256485
+Node: Structure Measurement3258251
+Node: Library Summary3259042
+Node: Installation3528714
+Node: Configuring and compiling3529849
+Node: Running make install3541484
+Node: Tools for Compilation3545169
+Node: Linux3547770
+Node: Reporting Bugs3550200
+Node: Maintenance3552551
+Node: Source Layout3552952
+Node: Adding Platform-specific3557024
+Node: Porting3560062
+Node: Hierarchy Conventions3567779
+Node: Porting to Unix3572833
+Node: Platform3574857
+Node: PowerPC3575168
+Node: Contributors3579060
+Node: Free Manuals3591120
+Node: Copying3596058
+Node: Documentation License3688300
+Node: Concept Index3713438
+Node: Type Index3819465
+Node: Function Index3838048
+Node: Variable Index4031944
+Node: File Index4139216
 
 End Tag Table
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info-1 b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info-1
index 57a4dbd..f397da6 100644
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info-1
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info-1
@@ -1,7 +1,24 @@
-This is
-/usr/local/google/home/jnewlin/src/uclibc/buildroot/output/build/glibc-2.19/build/manual/libc.info,
-produced by makeinfo version 4.13 from libc.texinfo.
+This is libc.info, produced by makeinfo version 5.2 from libc.texinfo.
 
+This file documents the GNU C Library.
+
+   This is 'The GNU C Library Reference Manual', for version 2.19
+(Buildroot).
+
+   Copyright (C) 1993-2014 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+
+   Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
+under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3 or
+any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with the
+Invariant Sections being "Free Software Needs Free Documentation" and
+"GNU Lesser General Public License", the Front-Cover texts being "A GNU
+Manual", and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a) below.  A copy of the
+license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation
+License".
+
+   (a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: "You have the freedom to copy and
+modify this GNU manual.  Buying copies from the FSF supports it in
+developing GNU and promoting software freedom."
 INFO-DIR-SECTION Software libraries
 START-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
 * Libc: (libc).                 C library.
@@ -1692,33 +1709,13 @@
 * ynl: (libc)Special Functions.
 END-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
 
-   This file documents the GNU C Library.
-
-   This is `The GNU C Library Reference Manual', for version 2.19
-(Buildroot).
-
-   Copyright (C) 1993-2014 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-   Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
-under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version
-1.3 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
-with the Invariant Sections being "Free Software Needs Free
-Documentation" and "GNU Lesser General Public License", the Front-Cover
-texts being "A GNU Manual", and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a)
-below.  A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU
-Free Documentation License".
-
-   (a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: "You have the freedom to copy and
-modify this GNU manual.  Buying copies from the FSF supports it in
-developing GNU and promoting software freedom."
-
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Top,  Next: Introduction,  Prev: (dir),  Up: (dir)
 
 Main Menu
 *********
 
-This is `The GNU C Library Reference Manual', for Version 2.19
+This is 'The GNU C Library Reference Manual', for Version 2.19
 (Buildroot) of the GNU C Library.
 
 * Menu:
@@ -1736,7 +1733,7 @@
 * Message Translation::          How to make the program speak the user's
                                    language.
 * Searching and Sorting::        General searching and sorting functions.
-* Pattern Matching::             Matching shell ``globs'' and regular
+* Pattern Matching::             Matching shell "globs" and regular
                                    expressions.
 * I/O Overview::                 Introduction to the I/O facilities.
 * I/O on Streams::               High-level, portable I/O facilities.
@@ -1798,7 +1795,8 @@
 * Variable Index::               Index of variables and variable-like macros.
 * File Index::                   Index of programs and files.
 
-  --- The Detailed Node Listing ---
+ 
+ -- The Detailed Node Listing --
 
 Introduction
 
@@ -1848,13 +1846,13 @@
 
 * Memory Concepts::             An introduction to concepts and terminology.
 * Memory Allocation::           Allocating storage for your program data
-* Resizing the Data Segment::   `brk', `sbrk'
+* Resizing the Data Segment::   'brk', 'sbrk'
 * Locking Pages::               Preventing page faults
 
 Memory Allocation
 
 * Memory Allocation and C::     How to get different kinds of allocation in C.
-* Unconstrained Allocation::    The `malloc' facility allows fully general
+* Unconstrained Allocation::    The 'malloc' facility allows fully general
 		 		 dynamic allocation.
 * Allocation Debugging::        Finding memory leaks and not freed memory.
 * Obstacks::                    Obstacks are less general than malloc
@@ -1865,25 +1863,25 @@
 
 Unconstrained Allocation
 
-* Basic Allocation::            Simple use of `malloc'.
-* Malloc Examples::             Examples of `malloc'.  `xmalloc'.
-* Freeing after Malloc::        Use `free' to free a block you
-				 got with `malloc'.
-* Changing Block Size::         Use `realloc' to make a block
+* Basic Allocation::            Simple use of 'malloc'.
+* Malloc Examples::             Examples of 'malloc'.  'xmalloc'.
+* Freeing after Malloc::        Use 'free' to free a block you
+				 got with 'malloc'.
+* Changing Block Size::         Use 'realloc' to make a block
 				 bigger or smaller.
-* Allocating Cleared Space::    Use `calloc' to allocate a
+* Allocating Cleared Space::    Use 'calloc' to allocate a
 				 block and clear it.
 * Efficiency and Malloc::       Efficiency considerations in use of
 				 these functions.
 * Aligned Memory Blocks::       Allocating specially aligned memory.
-* Malloc Tunable Parameters::   Use `mallopt' to adjust allocation
+* Malloc Tunable Parameters::   Use 'mallopt' to adjust allocation
                                  parameters.
 * Heap Consistency Checking::   Automatic checking for errors.
 * Hooks for Malloc::            You can use these hooks for debugging
-				 programs that use `malloc'.
+				 programs that use 'malloc'.
 * Statistics of Malloc::        Getting information about how much
 				 memory your program is using.
-* Summary of Malloc::           Summary of `malloc' and related functions.
+* Summary of Malloc::           Summary of 'malloc' and related functions.
 
 Allocation Debugging
 
@@ -1912,9 +1910,9 @@
 
 Variable Size Automatic
 
-* Alloca Example::              Example of using `alloca'.
-* Advantages of Alloca::        Reasons to use `alloca'.
-* Disadvantages of Alloca::     Reasons to avoid `alloca'.
+* Alloca Example::              Example of using 'alloca'.
+* Advantages of Alloca::        Reasons to use 'alloca'.
+* Disadvantages of Alloca::     Reasons to avoid 'alloca'.
 * GNU C Variable-Size Arrays::  Only in GNU C, here is an alternative
 				 method of allocating dynamically and
 				 freeing automatically.
@@ -1991,10 +1989,10 @@
 Generic Charset Conversion
 
 * Generic Conversion Interface::    Generic Character Set Conversion Interface.
-* iconv Examples::                  A complete `iconv' example.
-* Other iconv Implementations::     Some Details about other `iconv'
+* iconv Examples::                  A complete 'iconv' example.
+* Other iconv Implementations::     Some Details about other 'iconv'
                                      Implementations.
-* glibc iconv Implementation::      The `iconv' Implementation in the GNU C
+* glibc iconv Implementation::      The 'iconv' Implementation in the GNU C
                                      library.
 
 Locales
@@ -2013,36 +2011,36 @@
 
 Locale Information
 
-* The Lame Way to Locale Data::   ISO C's `localeconv'.
-* The Elegant and Fast Way::      X/Open's `nl_langinfo'.
+* The Lame Way to Locale Data::   ISO C's 'localeconv'.
+* The Elegant and Fast Way::      X/Open's 'nl_langinfo'.
 
 The Lame Way to Locale Data
 
 * General Numeric::             Parameters for formatting numbers and
                                  currency amounts.
 * Currency Symbol::             How to print the symbol that identifies an
-                                 amount of money (e.g. `$').
+                                 amount of money (e.g. '$').
 * Sign of Money Amount::        How to print the (positive or negative) sign
                                  for a monetary amount, if one exists.
 
 Message Translation
 
-* Message catalogs a la X/Open::  The `catgets' family of functions.
-* The Uniforum approach::         The `gettext' family of functions.
+* Message catalogs a la X/Open::  The 'catgets' family of functions.
+* The Uniforum approach::         The 'gettext' family of functions.
 
 Message catalogs a la X/Open
 
-* The catgets Functions::      The `catgets' function family.
+* The catgets Functions::      The 'catgets' function family.
 * The message catalog files::  Format of the message catalog files.
 * The gencat program::         How to generate message catalogs files which
                                 can be used by the functions.
-* Common Usage::               How to use the `catgets' interface.
+* Common Usage::               How to use the 'catgets' interface.
 
 The Uniforum approach
 
-* Message catalogs with gettext::  The `gettext' family of functions.
+* Message catalogs with gettext::  The 'gettext' family of functions.
 * Helper programs for gettext::    Programs to handle message catalogs
-                                    for `gettext'.
+                                    for 'gettext'.
 
 Message catalogs with gettext
 
@@ -2051,10 +2049,10 @@
 * Advanced gettext functions::     Additional functions for more complicated
                                     situations.
 * Charset conversion in gettext::  How to specify the output character set
-                                    `gettext' uses.
-* GUI program problems::           How to use `gettext' in GUI programs.
+                                    'gettext' uses.
+* GUI program problems::           How to use 'gettext' in GUI programs.
 * Using gettextized software::     The possibilities of the user to influence
-                                    the way `gettext' works.
+                                    the way 'gettext' works.
 
 Searching and Sorting
 
@@ -2062,11 +2060,11 @@
 				 Since the sort and search facilities
                                  are general, you have to specify the
                                  ordering.
-* Array Search Function::       The `bsearch' function.
-* Array Sort Function::         The `qsort' function.
+* Array Search Function::       The 'bsearch' function.
+* Array Sort Function::         The 'qsort' function.
 * Search/Sort Example::         An example program.
-* Hash Search Function::        The `hsearch' function.
-* Tree Search Function::        The `tsearch' function.
+* Hash Search Function::        The 'hsearch' function.
+* Tree Search Function::        The 'tsearch' function.
 
 Pattern Matching
 
@@ -2079,16 +2077,16 @@
 
 Globbing
 
-* Calling Glob::             Basic use of `glob'.
-* Flags for Globbing::       Flags that enable various options in `glob'.
-* More Flags for Globbing::  GNU specific extensions to `glob'.
+* Calling Glob::             Basic use of 'glob'.
+* Flags for Globbing::       Flags that enable various options in 'glob'.
+* More Flags for Globbing::  GNU specific extensions to 'glob'.
 
 Regular Expressions
 
-* POSIX Regexp Compilation::    Using `regcomp' to prepare to match.
-* Flags for POSIX Regexps::     Syntax variations for `regcomp'.
-* Matching POSIX Regexps::      Using `regexec' to match the compiled
-				   pattern that you get from `regcomp'.
+* POSIX Regexp Compilation::    Using 'regcomp' to prepare to match.
+* Flags for POSIX Regexps::     Syntax variations for 'regcomp'.
+* Matching POSIX Regexps::      Using 'regexec' to match the compiled
+				   pattern that you get from 'regcomp'.
 * Regexp Subexpressions::       Finding which parts of the string were matched.
 * Subexpression Complications:: Find points of which parts were matched.
 * Regexp Cleanup::		Freeing storage; reporting errors.
@@ -2096,8 +2094,8 @@
 Word Expansion
 
 * Expansion Stages::            What word expansion does to a string.
-* Calling Wordexp::             How to call `wordexp'.
-* Flags for Wordexp::           Options you can enable in `wordexp'.
+* Calling Wordexp::             How to call 'wordexp'.
+* Flags for Wordexp::           Options you can enable in 'wordexp'.
 * Wordexp Example::             A sample program that does word expansion.
 * Tilde Expansion::             Details of how tilde expansion works.
 * Variable Substitution::       Different types of variable substitution.
@@ -2135,10 +2133,10 @@
 * Line Input::                  Reading a line or a record from a stream.
 * Unreading::                   Peeking ahead/pushing back input just read.
 * Block Input/Output::          Input and output operations on blocks of data.
-* Formatted Output::            `printf' and related functions.
+* Formatted Output::            'printf' and related functions.
 * Customizing Printf::          You can define new conversion specifiers for
-				 `printf' and friends.
-* Formatted Input::             `scanf' and related functions.
+				 'printf' and friends.
+* Formatted Input::             'scanf' and related functions.
 * EOF and Errors::              How you can tell if an I/O error happens.
 * Error Recovery::		What you can do about errors.
 * Binary Streams::              Some systems distinguish between text files
@@ -2153,7 +2151,7 @@
 Unreading
 
 * Unreading Idea::              An explanation of unreading with pictures.
-* How Unread::                  How to call `ungetc' to do unreading.
+* How Unread::                  How to call 'ungetc' to do unreading.
 
 Formatted Output
 
@@ -2169,24 +2167,24 @@
 				 characters, pointers, and the like.
 * Formatted Output Functions::  Descriptions of the actual functions.
 * Dynamic Output::		Functions that allocate memory for the output.
-* Variable Arguments Output::   `vprintf' and friends.
+* Variable Arguments Output::   'vprintf' and friends.
 * Parsing a Template String::   What kinds of args does a given template
 				 call for?
-* Example of Parsing::          Sample program using `parse_printf_format'.
+* Example of Parsing::          Sample program using 'parse_printf_format'.
 
 Customizing Printf
 
-* Registering New Conversions::         Using `register_printf_function'
+* Registering New Conversions::         Using 'register_printf_function'
 					 to register a new output conversion.
 * Conversion Specifier Options::        The handler must be able to get
 					 the options specified in the
 					 template when it is called.
 * Defining the Output Handler::         Defining the handler and arginfo
 					 functions that are passed as arguments
-					 to `register_printf_function'.
-* Printf Extension Example::            How to define a `printf'
+					 to 'register_printf_function'.
+* Printf Extension Example::            How to define a 'printf'
 					 handler function.
-* Predefined Printf Handlers::          Predefined `printf' handlers.
+* Predefined Printf Handlers::          Predefined 'printf' handlers.
 
 Formatted Input
 
@@ -2195,10 +2193,10 @@
 * Table of Input Conversions::  Summary of input conversions and what they do.
 * Numeric Input Conversions::   Details of conversions for reading numbers.
 * String Input Conversions::    Details of conversions for reading strings.
-* Dynamic String Input::	String conversions that `malloc' the buffer.
+* Dynamic String Input::	String conversions that 'malloc' the buffer.
 * Other Input Conversions::     Details of miscellaneous other conversions.
 * Formatted Input Functions::   Descriptions of the actual functions.
-* Variable Arguments Input::    `vscanf' and friends.
+* Variable Arguments Input::    'vscanf' and friends.
 
 Stream Buffering
 
@@ -2222,9 +2220,9 @@
 
 Formatted Messages
 
-* Printing Formatted Messages::   The `fmtmsg' function.
+* Printing Formatted Messages::   The 'fmtmsg' function.
 * Adding Severity Classes::       Add more severity classes.
-* Example::                       How to use `fmtmsg' and `addseverity'.
+* Example::                       How to use 'fmtmsg' and 'addseverity'.
 
 Low-Level I/O
 
@@ -2276,7 +2274,7 @@
 File Status Flags
 
 * Access Modes::                Whether the descriptor can read or write.
-* Open-time Flags::             Details of `open'.
+* Open-time Flags::             Details of 'open'.
 * Operating Modes::             Special modes to control I/O operations.
 * Getting File Status Flags::   Fetching and changing these flags.
 
@@ -2289,7 +2287,7 @@
 * Working with Directory Trees:: Apply actions to all files or a selectable
                                  subset of a directory hierarchy.
 * Hard Links::                  Adding alternate names to a file.
-* Symbolic Links::              A file that ``points to'' a file name.
+* Symbolic Links::              A file that "points to" a file name.
 * Deleting Files::              How to delete a file, and what that means.
 * Renaming Files::              Changing a file's name.
 * Creating Directories::        A system call just for creating a directory.
@@ -2330,7 +2328,7 @@
 
 Pipes and FIFOs
 
-* Creating a Pipe::             Making a pipe with the `pipe' function.
+* Creating a Pipe::             Making a pipe with the 'pipe' function.
 * Pipe to a Subprocess::        Using a pipe to communicate with a
 				 child process.
 * FIFO Special Files::          Making a FIFO special file.
@@ -2340,7 +2338,7 @@
 
 * Socket Concepts::	Basic concepts you need to know about.
 * Communication Styles::Stream communication, datagrams and other styles.
-* Socket Addresses::	How socket names (``addresses'') work.
+* Socket Addresses::	How socket names ("addresses") work.
 * Interface Naming::	Identifying specific network interfaces.
 * Local Namespace::	Details about the local namespace.
 * Internet Namespace::	Details about the Internet namespace.
@@ -2356,7 +2354,7 @@
 
 Socket Addresses
 
-* Address Formats::		About `struct sockaddr'.
+* Address Formats::		About 'struct sockaddr'.
 * Setting Address::		Binding an address to a socket.
 * Reading Address::		Reading the address of a socket.
 
@@ -2407,9 +2405,9 @@
 
 Transferring Data
 
-* Sending Data::		Sending data with `send'.
-* Receiving Data::		Reading data with `recv'.
-* Socket Data Options::		Using `send' and `recv'.
+* Sending Data::		Sending data with 'send'.
+* Receiving Data::		Reading data with 'recv'.
+* Socket Data Options::		Using 'send' and 'recv'.
 
 Datagrams
 
@@ -2447,7 +2445,7 @@
 
 Terminal Modes
 
-* Mode Data Types::             The data type `struct termios' and
+* Mode Data Types::             The data type 'struct termios' and
                                  related types.
 * Mode Functions::              Functions to read and set the terminal
                                  attributes.
@@ -2508,9 +2506,9 @@
 
 Pseudo-Random Numbers
 
-* ISO Random::                  `rand' and friends.
-* BSD Random::                  `random' and friends.
-* SVID Random::                 `drand48' and friends.
+* ISO Random::                  'rand' and friends.
+* BSD Random::                  'random' and friends.
+* SVID Random::                 'drand48' and friends.
 
 Arithmetic
 
@@ -2555,14 +2553,14 @@
 * Time Basics::                 Concepts and definitions.
 * Elapsed Time::                Data types to represent elapsed times
 * Processor And CPU Time::      Time a program has spent executing.
-* Calendar Time::               Manipulation of ``real'' dates and times.
+* Calendar Time::               Manipulation of "real" dates and times.
 * Setting an Alarm::            Sending a signal after a specified time.
 * Sleeping::                    Waiting for a period of time.
 
 Processor And CPU Time
 
-* CPU Time::                    The `clock' function.
-* Processor Time::              The `times' function.
+* CPU Time::                    The 'clock' function.
+* Processor Time::              The 'times' function.
 
 Calendar Time
 
@@ -2626,8 +2624,8 @@
 * Signal Actions::              Specifying what happens when a
                                  particular signal is delivered.
 * Defining Handlers::           How to write a signal handler function.
-* Interrupted Primitives::	Signal handlers affect use of `open',
-				 `read', `write' and other functions.
+* Interrupted Primitives::	Signal handlers affect use of 'open',
+				 'read', 'write' and other functions.
 * Generating Signals::          How to send a signal to a process.
 * Blocking Signals::            Making the system hold signals temporarily.
 * Waiting for a Signal::        Suspending your program until a signal
@@ -2657,8 +2655,8 @@
 
 Signal Actions
 
-* Basic Signal Handling::       The simple `signal' function.
-* Advanced Signal Handling::    The more powerful `sigaction' function.
+* Basic Signal Handling::       The simple 'signal' function.
+* Advanced Signal Handling::    The more powerful 'sigaction' function.
 * Signal and Sigaction::        How those two functions interact.
 * Sigaction Function Example::  An example of using the sigaction function.
 * Flags for Sigaction::         Specifying options for signal handling.
@@ -2690,8 +2688,8 @@
 
 * Signaling Yourself::          A process can send a signal to itself.
 * Signaling Another Process::   Send a signal to another process.
-* Permission for kill::         Permission for using `kill'.
-* Kill Example::                Using `kill' for Communication.
+* Permission for kill::         Permission for using 'kill'.
+* Kill Example::                Using 'kill' for Communication.
 
 Blocking Signals
 
@@ -2712,7 +2710,7 @@
 
 Waiting for a Signal
 
-* Using Pause::                 The simple way, using `pause'.
+* Using Pause::                 The simple way, using 'pause'.
 * Pause Problems::              Why the simple way is often not very good.
 * Sigsuspend::                  Reliably waiting for a specific signal.
 
@@ -2736,10 +2734,10 @@
 
 Parsing Program Arguments
 
-* Getopt::                      Parsing program options using `getopt'.
-* Argp::                        Parsing program options using `argp_parse'.
+* Getopt::                      Parsing program options using 'getopt'.
+* Argp::                        Parsing program options using 'argp_parse'.
 * Suboptions::                  Some programs need more detailed options.
-* Suboptions Example::          This shows how it could be done for `mount'.
+* Suboptions Example::          This shows how it could be done for 'mount'.
 
 Environment Variables
 
@@ -2750,13 +2748,13 @@
 
 Program Termination
 
-* Normal Termination::          If a program calls `exit', a
+* Normal Termination::          If a program calls 'exit', a
                                  process terminates normally.
-* Exit Status::                 The `exit status' provides information
+* Exit Status::                 The 'exit status' provides information
                                  about why the process terminated.
 * Cleanups on Exit::            A process can run its own cleanup
                                  functions upon normal termination.
-* Aborting a Program::          The `abort' function causes
+* Aborting a Program::          The 'abort' function causes
                                  abnormal program termination.
 * Termination Internals::       What happens when a process terminates.
 
@@ -2902,8 +2900,8 @@
 
 Mount Information
 
-* fstab::                       The `fstab' file
-* mtab::                        The `mtab' file
+* fstab::                       The 'fstab' file
+* mtab::                        The 'mtab' file
 * Other Mount Information::     Other (non-libc) sources of mount information
 
 System Configuration
@@ -2931,9 +2929,9 @@
 
 Sysconf
 
-* Sysconf Definition::        Detailed specifications of `sysconf'.
-* Constants for Sysconf::     The list of parameters `sysconf' can read.
-* Examples of Sysconf::       How to use `sysconf' and the parameter
+* Sysconf Definition::        Detailed specifications of 'sysconf'.
+* Constants for Sysconf::     The list of parameters 'sysconf' can read.
+* Examples of Sysconf::       How to use 'sysconf' and the parameter
 				 macros properly together.
 
 Cryptographic Functions
@@ -2967,11 +2965,11 @@
 
 Language Features
 
-* Consistency Checking::        Using `assert' to abort if
-				 something ``impossible'' happens.
+* Consistency Checking::        Using 'assert' to abort if
+				 something "impossible" happens.
 * Variadic Functions::          Defining functions with varying numbers
                                  of args.
-* Null Pointer Constant::       The macro `NULL'.
+* Null Pointer Constant::       The macro 'NULL'.
 * Important Data Types::        Data types for object sizes.
 * Data Type Measurements::      Parameters of data type representations.
 
@@ -3032,7 +3030,7 @@
 
 Porting
 
-* Hierarchy Conventions::       The layout of the `sysdeps' hierarchy.
+* Hierarchy Conventions::       The layout of the 'sysdeps' hierarchy.
 * Porting to Unix::             Porting the library to an average
                                    Unix-like system.
 
@@ -3049,7 +3047,7 @@
 The C language provides no built-in facilities for performing such
 common operations as input/output, memory management, string
 manipulation, and the like.  Instead, these facilities are defined in a
-standard "library", which you compile and link with your programs.  
+standard "library", which you compile and link with your programs.
 
    The GNU C Library, described in this document, defines all of the
 library functions that are specified by the ISO C standard, as well as
@@ -3085,20 +3083,20 @@
    The GNU C Library includes several "header files", each of which
 provides definitions and declarations for a group of related facilities;
 this information is used by the C compiler when processing your program.
-For example, the header file `stdio.h' declares facilities for
-performing input and output, and the header file `string.h' declares
+For example, the header file 'stdio.h' declares facilities for
+performing input and output, and the header file 'string.h' declares
 string processing utilities.  The organization of this manual generally
 follows the same division as the header files.
 
    If you are reading this manual for the first time, you should read
-all of the introductory material and skim the remaining chapters.
-There are a _lot_ of functions in the GNU C Library and it's not
-realistic to expect that you will be able to remember exactly _how_ to
-use each and every one of them.  It's more important to become
-generally familiar with the kinds of facilities that the library
-provides, so that when you are writing your programs you can recognize
-_when_ to make use of library functions, and _where_ in this manual you
-can find more specific information about them.
+all of the introductory material and skim the remaining chapters.  There
+are a _lot_ of functions in the GNU C Library and it's not realistic to
+expect that you will be able to remember exactly _how_ to use each and
+every one of them.  It's more important to become generally familiar
+with the kinds of facilities that the library provides, so that when you
+are writing your programs you can recognize _when_ to make use of
+library functions, and _where_ in this manual you can find more specific
+information about them.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Standards and Portability,  Next: Using the Library,  Prev: Getting Started,  Up: Introduction
@@ -3139,31 +3137,31 @@
 -----------
 
 The GNU C Library is compatible with the C standard adopted by the
-American National Standards Institute (ANSI): `American National
+American National Standards Institute (ANSI): 'American National
 Standard X3.159-1989--"ANSI C"' and later by the International
-Standardization Organization (ISO): `ISO/IEC 9899:1990, "Programming
-languages--C"'.  We here refer to the standard as ISO C since this is
-the more general standard in respect of ratification.  The header files
-and library facilities that make up the GNU C Library are a superset of
+Standardization Organization (ISO): 'ISO/IEC 9899:1990, "Programming
+languages--C"'. We here refer to the standard as ISO C since this is the
+more general standard in respect of ratification.  The header files and
+library facilities that make up the GNU C Library are a superset of
 those specified by the ISO C standard.
 
    If you are concerned about strict adherence to the ISO C standard,
-you should use the `-ansi' option when you compile your programs with
+you should use the '-ansi' option when you compile your programs with
 the GNU C compiler.  This tells the compiler to define _only_ ISO
 standard features from the library header files, unless you explicitly
 ask for additional features.  *Note Feature Test Macros::, for
 information on how to do this.
 
    Being able to restrict the library to include only ISO C features is
-important because ISO C puts limitations on what names can be defined
-by the library implementation, and the GNU extensions don't fit these
+important because ISO C puts limitations on what names can be defined by
+the library implementation, and the GNU extensions don't fit these
 limitations.  *Note Reserved Names::, for more information about these
 restrictions.
 
    This manual does not attempt to give you complete details on the
-differences between ISO C and older dialects.  It gives advice on how
-to write programs to work portably under multiple C dialects, but does
-not aim for completeness.
+differences between ISO C and older dialects.  It gives advice on how to
+write programs to work portably under multiple C dialects, but does not
+aim for completeness.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: POSIX,  Next: Berkeley Unix,  Prev: ISO C,  Up: Standards and Portability
@@ -3178,23 +3176,23 @@
 versions of the Unix operating system.
 
    The library facilities specified by the POSIX standards are a
-superset of those required by ISO C; POSIX specifies additional
-features for ISO C functions, as well as specifying new additional
-functions.  In general, the additional requirements and functionality
-defined by the POSIX standards are aimed at providing lower-level
-support for a particular kind of operating system environment, rather
-than general programming language support which can run in many diverse
-operating system environments.
+superset of those required by ISO C; POSIX specifies additional features
+for ISO C functions, as well as specifying new additional functions.  In
+general, the additional requirements and functionality defined by the
+POSIX standards are aimed at providing lower-level support for a
+particular kind of operating system environment, rather than general
+programming language support which can run in many diverse operating
+system environments.
 
    The GNU C Library implements all of the functions specified in
-`ISO/IEC 9945-1:1996, the POSIX System Application Program Interface',
+'ISO/IEC 9945-1:1996, the POSIX System Application Program Interface',
 commonly referred to as POSIX.1.  The primary extensions to the ISO C
 facilities specified by this standard include file system interface
 primitives (*note File System Interface::), device-specific terminal
 control functions (*note Low-Level Terminal Interface::), and process
 control functions (*note Processes::).
 
-   Some facilities from `ISO/IEC 9945-2:1993, the POSIX Shell and
+   Some facilities from 'ISO/IEC 9945-2:1993, the POSIX Shell and
 Utilities standard' (POSIX.2) are also implemented in the GNU C Library.
 These include utilities for dealing with regular expressions and other
 pattern matching facilities (*note Pattern Matching::).
@@ -3223,17 +3221,17 @@
 and Async-Cancel- -Safety.  Intuitive definitions of these properties,
 attempting to capture the meaning of the standard definitions, follow.
 
-   * `MT-Safe' or Thread-Safe functions are safe to call in the presence
+   * 'MT-Safe' or Thread-Safe functions are safe to call in the presence
      of other threads.  MT, in MT-Safe, stands for Multi Thread.
 
-     Being MT-Safe does not imply a function is atomic, nor that it
-     uses any of the memory synchronization mechanisms POSIX exposes to
+     Being MT-Safe does not imply a function is atomic, nor that it uses
+     any of the memory synchronization mechanisms POSIX exposes to
      users.  It is even possible that calling MT-Safe functions in
      sequence does not yield an MT-Safe combination.  For example,
      having a thread call two MT-Safe functions one right after the
-     other does not guarantee behavior equivalent to atomic execution
-     of a combination of both functions, since concurrent calls in
-     other threads may interfere in a destructive way.
+     other does not guarantee behavior equivalent to atomic execution of
+     a combination of both functions, since concurrent calls in other
+     threads may interfere in a destructive way.
 
      Whole-program optimizations that could inline functions across
      library interfaces may expose unsafe reordering, and so performing
@@ -3242,27 +3240,27 @@
      whole-program optimization.  However, functions defined in
      user-visible headers are designed to be safe for inlining.
 
-   * `AS-Safe' or Async-Signal-Safe functions are safe to call from
+   * 'AS-Safe' or Async-Signal-Safe functions are safe to call from
      asynchronous signal handlers.  AS, in AS-Safe, stands for
      Asynchronous Signal.
 
-     Many functions that are AS-Safe may set `errno', or modify the
+     Many functions that are AS-Safe may set 'errno', or modify the
      floating-point environment, because their doing so does not make
      them unsuitable for use in signal handlers.  However, programs
      could misbehave should asynchronous signal handlers modify this
      thread-local state, and the signal handling machinery cannot be
      counted on to preserve it.  Therefore, signal handlers that call
-     functions that may set `errno' or modify the floating-point
+     functions that may set 'errno' or modify the floating-point
      environment _must_ save their original values, and restore them
      before returning.
 
-   * `AC-Safe' or Async-Cancel-Safe functions are safe to call when
+   * 'AC-Safe' or Async-Cancel-Safe functions are safe to call when
      asynchronous cancellation is enabled.  AC in AC-Safe stands for
      Asynchronous Cancellation.
 
      The POSIX standard defines only three functions to be AC-Safe,
-     namely `pthread_cancel', `pthread_setcancelstate', and
-     `pthread_setcanceltype'.  At present the GNU C Library provides no
+     namely 'pthread_cancel', 'pthread_setcancelstate', and
+     'pthread_setcanceltype'.  At present the GNU C Library provides no
      guarantees beyond these three functions, but does document which
      functions are presently AC-Safe.  This documentation is provided
      for use by the GNU C Library developers.
@@ -3270,19 +3268,19 @@
      Just like signal handlers, cancellation cleanup routines must
      configure the floating point environment they require.  The
      routines cannot assume a floating point environment, particularly
-     when asynchronous cancellation is enabled.  If the configuration
-     of the floating point environment cannot be performed atomically
-     then it is also possible that the environment encountered is
-     internally inconsistent.
+     when asynchronous cancellation is enabled.  If the configuration of
+     the floating point environment cannot be performed atomically then
+     it is also possible that the environment encountered is internally
+     inconsistent.
 
-   * `MT-Unsafe', `AS-Unsafe', `AC-Unsafe' functions are not safe to
+   * 'MT-Unsafe', 'AS-Unsafe', 'AC-Unsafe' functions are not safe to
      call within the safety contexts described above.  Calling them
      within such contexts invokes undefined behavior.
 
      Functions not explicitly documented as safe in a safety context
      should be regarded as Unsafe.
 
-   * `Preliminary' safety properties are documented, indicating these
+   * 'Preliminary' safety properties are documented, indicating these
      properties may _not_ be counted on in future releases of the GNU C
      Library.
 
@@ -3293,10 +3291,10 @@
      Although we strive to abide by the standards, in some cases our
      implementation is safe even when the standard does not demand
      safety, and in other cases our implementation does not meet the
-     standard safety requirements.  The latter are most likely bugs;
-     the former, when marked as `Preliminary', should not be counted
-     on: future standards may require changes that are not compatible
-     with the additional safety properties afforded by the current
+     standard safety requirements.  The latter are most likely bugs; the
+     former, when marked as 'Preliminary', should not be counted on:
+     future standards may require changes that are not compatible with
+     the additional safety properties afforded by the current
      implementation.
 
      Furthermore, the POSIX standard does not offer a detailed
@@ -3314,10 +3312,9 @@
 
      Over time, we envision evolving the preliminary safety notes into
      stable commitments, as stable as those of our interfaces.  As we
-     do, we will remove the `Preliminary' keyword from safety notes.
-     As long as the keyword remains, however, they are not to be
-     regarded as a promise of future behavior.
-
+     do, we will remove the 'Preliminary' keyword from safety notes.  As
+     long as the keyword remains, however, they are not to be regarded
+     as a promise of future behavior.
 
    Other keywords that appear in safety notes are defined in subsequent
 sections.
@@ -3335,45 +3332,45 @@
 indicate they are never safe to call when asynchronous cancellation is
 enabled.  There are no MT-Unsafe marks in this section.
 
-   * `lock' 
+   * 'lock'
 
-     Functions marked with `lock' as an AS-Unsafe feature may be
+     Functions marked with 'lock' as an AS-Unsafe feature may be
      interrupted by a signal while holding a non-recursive lock.  If the
      signal handler calls another such function that takes the same
      lock, the result is a deadlock.
 
-     Functions annotated with `lock' as an AC-Unsafe feature may, if
+     Functions annotated with 'lock' as an AC-Unsafe feature may, if
      cancelled asynchronously, fail to release a lock that would have
      been released if their execution had not been interrupted by
      asynchronous thread cancellation.  Once a lock is left taken,
      attempts to take that lock will block indefinitely.
 
-   * `corrupt' 
+   * 'corrupt'
 
-     Functions marked with `corrupt' as an AS-Unsafe feature may corrupt
+     Functions marked with 'corrupt' as an AS-Unsafe feature may corrupt
      data structures and misbehave when they interrupt, or are
      interrupted by, another such function.  Unlike functions marked
-     with `lock', these take recursive locks to avoid MT-Safety
+     with 'lock', these take recursive locks to avoid MT-Safety
      problems, but this is not enough to stop a signal handler from
      observing a partially-updated data structure.  Further corruption
-     may arise from the interrupted function's failure to notice
-     updates made by signal handlers.
+     may arise from the interrupted function's failure to notice updates
+     made by signal handlers.
 
-     Functions marked with `corrupt' as an AC-Unsafe feature may leave
+     Functions marked with 'corrupt' as an AC-Unsafe feature may leave
      data structures in a corrupt, partially updated state.  Subsequent
      uses of the data structure may misbehave.
 
-   * `heap' 
+   * 'heap'
 
-     Functions marked with `heap' may call heap memory management
-     functions from the `malloc'/`free' family of functions and are
-     only as safe as those functions.  This note is thus equivalent to:
+     Functions marked with 'heap' may call heap memory management
+     functions from the 'malloc'/'free' family of functions and are only
+     as safe as those functions.  This note is thus equivalent to:
 
      | AS-Unsafe lock | AC-Unsafe lock fd mem |
 
-   * `dlopen' 
+   * 'dlopen'
 
-     Functions marked with `dlopen' use the dynamic loader to load
+     Functions marked with 'dlopen' use the dynamic loader to load
      shared libraries into the current execution image.  This involves
      opening files, mapping them into memory, allocating additional
      memory, resolving symbols, applying relocations and more, all of
@@ -3381,46 +3378,45 @@
 
      The locks are enough for these functions to be AS- and AC-Unsafe,
      but other issues may arise.  At present this is a placeholder for
-     all potential safety issues raised by `dlopen'.
+     all potential safety issues raised by 'dlopen'.
 
-   * `plugin' 
+   * 'plugin'
 
-     Functions annotated with `plugin' may run code from plugins that
+     Functions annotated with 'plugin' may run code from plugins that
      may be external to the GNU C Library.  Such plugin functions are
      assumed to be MT-Safe, AS-Unsafe and AC-Unsafe.  Examples of such
      plugins are stack unwinding libraries, name service switch (NSS)
      and character set conversion (iconv) back-ends.
 
      Although the plugins mentioned as examples are all brought in by
-     means of dlopen, the `plugin' keyword does not imply any direct
-     involvement of the dynamic loader or the `libdl' interfaces, those
-     are covered by `dlopen'.  For example, if one function loads a
+     means of dlopen, the 'plugin' keyword does not imply any direct
+     involvement of the dynamic loader or the 'libdl' interfaces, those
+     are covered by 'dlopen'.  For example, if one function loads a
      module and finds the addresses of some of its functions, while
      another just calls those already-resolved functions, the former
-     will be marked with `dlopen', whereas the latter will get the
-     `plugin'.  When a single function takes all of these actions, then
+     will be marked with 'dlopen', whereas the latter will get the
+     'plugin'.  When a single function takes all of these actions, then
      it gets both marks.
 
-   * `i18n' 
+   * 'i18n'
 
-     Functions marked with `i18n' may call internationalization
-     functions of the `gettext' family and will be only as safe as those
+     Functions marked with 'i18n' may call internationalization
+     functions of the 'gettext' family and will be only as safe as those
      functions.  This note is thus equivalent to:
 
      | MT-Safe env | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap dlopen | AC-Unsafe corrupt |
 
-   * `timer' 
+   * 'timer'
 
-     Functions marked with `timer' use the `alarm' function or similar
+     Functions marked with 'timer' use the 'alarm' function or similar
      to set a time-out for a system call or a long-running operation.
      In a multi-threaded program, there is a risk that the time-out
      signal will be delivered to a different thread, thus failing to
      interrupt the intended thread.  Besides being MT-Unsafe, such
      functions are always AS-Unsafe, because calling them in signal
-     handlers may interfere with timers set in the interrupted code,
-     and AC-Unsafe, because there is no safe way to guarantee an
-     earlier timer will be reset in case of asynchronous cancellation.
-
+     handlers may interfere with timers set in the interrupted code, and
+     AC-Unsafe, because there is no safe way to guarantee an earlier
+     timer will be reset in case of asynchronous cancellation.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Conditionally Safe Features,  Next: Other Safety Remarks,  Prev: Unsafe Features,  Up: POSIX
@@ -3438,9 +3434,9 @@
 documented constraints, does the function become safe to call in a
 context.
 
-   * `init' 
+   * 'init'
 
-     Functions marked with `init' as an MT-Unsafe feature perform
+     Functions marked with 'init' as an MT-Unsafe feature perform
      MT-Unsafe initialization when they are first called.
 
      Calling such a function at least once in single-threaded mode
@@ -3448,12 +3444,12 @@
      MT-Unsafe.  If no other cause for that remains, the function can
      then be safely called after other threads are started.
 
-     Functions marked with `init' as an AS- or AC-Unsafe feature use the
-     internal `libc_once' machinery or similar to initialize internal
+     Functions marked with 'init' as an AS- or AC-Unsafe feature use the
+     internal 'libc_once' machinery or similar to initialize internal
      data structures.
 
      If a signal handler interrupts such an initializer, and calls any
-     function that also performs `libc_once' initialization, it will
+     function that also performs 'libc_once' initialization, it will
      deadlock if the thread library has been loaded.
 
      Furthermore, if an initializer is partially complete before it is
@@ -3462,58 +3458,58 @@
      more than once, leaking resources or even resulting in corrupt
      internal data.
 
-     Applications that need to call functions marked with `init' as an
+     Applications that need to call functions marked with 'init' as an
      AS- or AC-Unsafe feature should ensure the initialization is
      performed before configuring signal handlers or enabling
      cancellation, so that the AS- and AC-Safety issues related with
-     `libc_once' do not arise.
+     'libc_once' do not arise.
 
-   * `race' 
+   * 'race'
 
-     Functions annotated with `race' as an MT-Safety issue operate on
+     Functions annotated with 'race' as an MT-Safety issue operate on
      objects in ways that may cause data races or similar forms of
      destructive interference out of concurrent execution.  In some
-     cases, the objects are passed to the functions by users; in
-     others, they are used by the functions to return values to users;
-     in others, they are not even exposed to users.
+     cases, the objects are passed to the functions by users; in others,
+     they are used by the functions to return values to users; in
+     others, they are not even exposed to users.
 
      We consider access to objects passed as (indirect) arguments to
      functions to be data race free.  The assurance of data race free
      objects is the caller's responsibility.  We will not mark a
-     function as MT-Unsafe or AS-Unsafe if it misbehaves when users
-     fail to take the measures required by POSIX to avoid data races
-     when dealing with such objects.  As a general rule, if a function
-     is documented as reading from an object passed (by reference) to
-     it, or modifying it, users ought to use memory synchronization
+     function as MT-Unsafe or AS-Unsafe if it misbehaves when users fail
+     to take the measures required by POSIX to avoid data races when
+     dealing with such objects.  As a general rule, if a function is
+     documented as reading from an object passed (by reference) to it,
+     or modifying it, users ought to use memory synchronization
      primitives to avoid data races just as they would should they
      perform the accesses themselves rather than by calling the library
-     function.  `FILE' streams are the exception to the general rule,
-     in that POSIX mandates the library to guard against data races in
-     many functions that manipulate objects of this specific opaque
-     type.  We regard this as a convenience provided to users, rather
-     than as a general requirement whose expectations should extend to
-     other types.
+     function.  'FILE' streams are the exception to the general rule, in
+     that POSIX mandates the library to guard against data races in many
+     functions that manipulate objects of this specific opaque type.  We
+     regard this as a convenience provided to users, rather than as a
+     general requirement whose expectations should extend to other
+     types.
 
      In order to remind users that guarding certain arguments is their
      responsibility, we will annotate functions that take objects of
-     certain types as arguments.  We draw the line for objects passed
-     by users as follows: objects whose types are exposed to users, and
-     that users are expected to access directly, such as memory
-     buffers, strings, and various user-visible `struct' types, do
-     _not_ give reason for functions to be annotated with `race'.  It
-     would be noisy and redundant with the general requirement, and not
-     many would be surprised by the library's lack of internal guards
-     when accessing objects that can be accessed directly by users.
+     certain types as arguments.  We draw the line for objects passed by
+     users as follows: objects whose types are exposed to users, and
+     that users are expected to access directly, such as memory buffers,
+     strings, and various user-visible 'struct' types, do _not_ give
+     reason for functions to be annotated with 'race'.  It would be
+     noisy and redundant with the general requirement, and not many
+     would be surprised by the library's lack of internal guards when
+     accessing objects that can be accessed directly by users.
 
      As for objects that are opaque or opaque-like, in that they are to
      be manipulated only by passing them to library functions (e.g.,
-     `FILE', `DIR', `obstack', `iconv_t'), there might be additional
+     'FILE', 'DIR', 'obstack', 'iconv_t'), there might be additional
      expectations as to internal coordination of access by the library.
-     We will annotate, with `race' followed by a colon and the argument
-     name, functions that take such objects but that do not take care
-     of synchronizing access to them by default.  For example, `FILE'
-     stream `unlocked' functions will be annotated, but those that
-     perform implicit locking on `FILE' streams by default will not,
+     We will annotate, with 'race' followed by a colon and the argument
+     name, functions that take such objects but that do not take care of
+     synchronizing access to them by default.  For example, 'FILE'
+     stream 'unlocked' functions will be annotated, but those that
+     perform implicit locking on 'FILE' streams by default will not,
      even though the implicit locking may be disabled on a per-stream
      basis.
 
@@ -3526,69 +3522,69 @@
      This user responsibility does not apply, however, to objects
      controlled by the library itself, such as internal objects and
      static buffers used to return values from certain calls.  When the
-     library doesn't guard them against concurrent uses, these cases
-     are regarded as MT-Unsafe and AS-Unsafe (although the `race' mark
-     under AS-Unsafe will be omitted as redundant with the one under
+     library doesn't guard them against concurrent uses, these cases are
+     regarded as MT-Unsafe and AS-Unsafe (although the 'race' mark under
+     AS-Unsafe will be omitted as redundant with the one under
      MT-Unsafe).  As in the case of user-exposed objects, the mark may
      be followed by a colon and an identifier.  The identifier groups
-     all functions that operate on a certain unguarded object; users
-     may avoid the MT-Safety issues related with unguarded concurrent
-     access to such internal objects by creating a non-recursive mutex
-     related with the identifier, and always holding the mutex when
-     calling any function marked as racy on that identifier, as they
-     would have to should the identifier be an object under user
-     control.  The non-recursive mutex avoids the MT-Safety issue, but
-     it trades one AS-Safety issue for another, so use in asynchronous
-     signals remains undefined.
+     all functions that operate on a certain unguarded object; users may
+     avoid the MT-Safety issues related with unguarded concurrent access
+     to such internal objects by creating a non-recursive mutex related
+     with the identifier, and always holding the mutex when calling any
+     function marked as racy on that identifier, as they would have to
+     should the identifier be an object under user control.  The
+     non-recursive mutex avoids the MT-Safety issue, but it trades one
+     AS-Safety issue for another, so use in asynchronous signals remains
+     undefined.
 
      When the identifier relates to a static buffer used to hold return
-     values, the mutex must be held for as long as the buffer remains
-     in use by the caller.  Many functions that return pointers to
-     static buffers offer reentrant variants that store return values
-     in caller-supplied buffers instead.  In some cases, such as
-     `tmpname', the variant is chosen not by calling an alternate entry
-     point, but by passing a non-`NULL' pointer to the buffer in which
-     the returned values are to be stored.  These variants are
-     generally preferable in multi-threaded programs, although some of
-     them are not MT-Safe because of other internal buffers, also
-     documented with `race' notes.
+     values, the mutex must be held for as long as the buffer remains in
+     use by the caller.  Many functions that return pointers to static
+     buffers offer reentrant variants that store return values in
+     caller-supplied buffers instead.  In some cases, such as 'tmpname',
+     the variant is chosen not by calling an alternate entry point, but
+     by passing a non-'NULL' pointer to the buffer in which the returned
+     values are to be stored.  These variants are generally preferable
+     in multi-threaded programs, although some of them are not MT-Safe
+     because of other internal buffers, also documented with 'race'
+     notes.
 
-   * `const' 
+   * 'const'
 
-     Functions marked with `const' as an MT-Safety issue non-atomically
+     Functions marked with 'const' as an MT-Safety issue non-atomically
      modify internal objects that are better regarded as constant,
      because a substantial portion of the GNU C Library accesses them
-     without synchronization.  Unlike `race', that causes both readers
+     without synchronization.  Unlike 'race', that causes both readers
      and writers of internal objects to be regarded as MT-Unsafe and
      AS-Unsafe, this mark is applied to writers only.  Writers remain
-     equally MT- and AS-Unsafe to call, but the then-mandatory
-     constness of objects they modify enables readers to be regarded as
-     MT-Safe and AS-Safe (as long as no other reasons for them to be
-     unsafe remain), since the lack of synchronization is not a problem
-     when the objects are effectively constant.
+     equally MT- and AS-Unsafe to call, but the then-mandatory constness
+     of objects they modify enables readers to be regarded as MT-Safe
+     and AS-Safe (as long as no other reasons for them to be unsafe
+     remain), since the lack of synchronization is not a problem when
+     the objects are effectively constant.
 
-     The identifier that follows the `const' mark will appear by itself
+     The identifier that follows the 'const' mark will appear by itself
      as a safety note in readers.  Programs that wish to work around
      this safety issue, so as to call writers, may use a non-recursve
-     `rwlock' associated with the identifier, and guard _all_ calls to
-     functions marked with `const' followed by the identifier with a
+     'rwlock' associated with the identifier, and guard _all_ calls to
+     functions marked with 'const' followed by the identifier with a
      write lock, and _all_ calls to functions marked with the identifier
      by itself with a read lock.  The non-recursive locking removes the
-     MT-Safety problem, but it trades one AS-Safety problem for
-     another, so use in asynchronous signals remains undefined.
+     MT-Safety problem, but it trades one AS-Safety problem for another,
+     so use in asynchronous signals remains undefined.
 
-   * `sig' 
+   * 'sig'
 
-     Functions marked with `sig' as a MT-Safety issue (that implies an
+     Functions marked with 'sig' as a MT-Safety issue (that implies an
      identical AS-Safety issue, omitted for brevity) may temporarily
-     install a signal handler for internal purposes, which may
-     interfere with other uses of the signal, identified after a colon.
+     install a signal handler for internal purposes, which may interfere
+     with other uses of the signal, identified after a colon.
 
      This safety problem can be worked around by ensuring that no other
      uses of the signal will take place for the duration of the call.
      Holding a non-recursive mutex while calling all functions that use
-     the same temporary signal; blocking that signal before the call
-     and resetting its handler afterwards is recommended.
+     the same temporary signal; blocking that signal before the call and
+     resetting its handler afterwards is recommended.
 
      There is no safe way to guarantee the original signal handler is
      restored in case of asynchronous cancellation, therefore so-marked
@@ -3600,13 +3596,13 @@
      handler to restore the signal to the desired state and to release
      the mutex are recommended.
 
-   * `term' 
+   * 'term'
 
-     Functions marked with `term' as an MT-Safety issue may change the
-     terminal settings in the recommended way, namely: call `tcgetattr',
-     modify some flags, and then call `tcsetattr'; this creates a window
+     Functions marked with 'term' as an MT-Safety issue may change the
+     terminal settings in the recommended way, namely: call 'tcgetattr',
+     modify some flags, and then call 'tcsetattr'; this creates a window
      in which changes made by other threads are lost.  Thus, functions
-     marked with `term' are MT-Unsafe.  The same window enables changes
+     marked with 'term' are MT-Unsafe.  The same window enables changes
      made by asynchronous signals to be lost.  These functions are also
      AS-Unsafe, but the corresponding mark is omitted as redundant.
 
@@ -3615,12 +3611,12 @@
      signal handlers or blocking signals that might use it, and holding
      a lock while calling these functions and interacting with the
      terminal.  This lock should also be used for mutual exclusion with
-     functions marked with `race:tcattr(fd)', where FD is a file
+     functions marked with 'race:tcattr(fd)', where FD is a file
      descriptor for the controlling terminal.  The caller may use a
-     single mutex for simplicity, or use one mutex per terminal, even
-     if referenced by different file descriptors.
+     single mutex for simplicity, or use one mutex per terminal, even if
+     referenced by different file descriptors.
 
-     Functions marked with `term' as an AC-Safety issue are supposed to
+     Functions marked with 'term' as an AC-Safety issue are supposed to
      restore terminal settings to their original state, after
      temporarily changing them, but they may fail to do so if cancelled.
 
@@ -3630,7 +3626,6 @@
      handler to restore the terminal settings to the original state and
      to release the mutex are recommended.
 
-
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Other Safety Remarks,  Prev: Conditionally Safe Features,  Up: POSIX
 
@@ -3641,92 +3636,92 @@
 that do not make a function unsafe to call, but that may need to be
 taken into account in certain classes of programs:
 
-   * `locale' 
+   * 'locale'
 
-     Functions annotated with `locale' as an MT-Safety issue read from
+     Functions annotated with 'locale' as an MT-Safety issue read from
      the locale object without any form of synchronization.  Functions
-     annotated with `locale' called concurrently with locale changes may
+     annotated with 'locale' called concurrently with locale changes may
      behave in ways that do not correspond to any of the locales active
      during their execution, but an unpredictable mix thereof.
 
      We do not mark these functions as MT- or AS-Unsafe, however,
      because functions that modify the locale object are marked with
-     `const:locale' and regarded as unsafe.  Being unsafe, the latter
+     'const:locale' and regarded as unsafe.  Being unsafe, the latter
      are not to be called when multiple threads are running or
      asynchronous signals are enabled, and so the locale can be
      considered effectively constant in these contexts, which makes the
      former safe.
 
-   * `env' 
+   * 'env'
 
-     Functions marked with `env' as an MT-Safety issue access the
-     environment with `getenv' or similar, without any guards to ensure
+     Functions marked with 'env' as an MT-Safety issue access the
+     environment with 'getenv' or similar, without any guards to ensure
      safety in the presence of concurrent modifications.
 
      We do not mark these functions as MT- or AS-Unsafe, however,
      because functions that modify the environment are all marked with
-     `const:env' and regarded as unsafe.  Being unsafe, the latter are
+     'const:env' and regarded as unsafe.  Being unsafe, the latter are
      not to be called when multiple threads are running or asynchronous
      signals are enabled, and so the environment can be considered
      effectively constant in these contexts, which makes the former
      safe.
 
-   * `hostid' 
+   * 'hostid'
 
-     The function marked with `hostid' as an MT-Safety issue reads from
+     The function marked with 'hostid' as an MT-Safety issue reads from
      the system-wide data structures that hold the "host ID" of the
      machine.  These data structures cannot generally be modified
      atomically.  Since it is expected that the "host ID" will not
-     normally change, the function that reads from it (`gethostid') is
+     normally change, the function that reads from it ('gethostid') is
      regarded as safe, whereas the function that modifies it
-     (`sethostid') is marked with `const:hostid', indicating it may
-     require special care if it is to be called.  In this specific
-     case, the special care amounts to system-wide (not merely
-     intra-process) coordination.
+     ('sethostid') is marked with 'const:hostid', indicating it may
+     require special care if it is to be called.  In this specific case,
+     the special care amounts to system-wide (not merely intra-process)
+     coordination.
 
-   * `sigintr' 
+   * 'sigintr'
 
-     Functions marked with `sigintr' as an MT-Safety issue access the
-     `_sigintr' internal data structure without any guards to ensure
+     Functions marked with 'sigintr' as an MT-Safety issue access the
+     '_sigintr' internal data structure without any guards to ensure
      safety in the presence of concurrent modifications.
 
      We do not mark these functions as MT- or AS-Unsafe, however,
      because functions that modify the this data structure are all
-     marked with `const:sigintr' and regarded as unsafe.  Being unsafe,
+     marked with 'const:sigintr' and regarded as unsafe.  Being unsafe,
      the latter are not to be called when multiple threads are running
      or asynchronous signals are enabled, and so the data structure can
      be considered effectively constant in these contexts, which makes
      the former safe.
 
-   * `fd' 
+   * 'fd'
 
-     Functions annotated with `fd' as an AC-Safety issue may leak file
+     Functions annotated with 'fd' as an AC-Safety issue may leak file
      descriptors if asynchronous thread cancellation interrupts their
      execution.
 
      Functions that allocate or deallocate file descriptors will
-     generally be marked as such.  Even if they attempted to protect
-     the file descriptor allocation and deallocation with cleanup
-     regions, allocating a new descriptor and storing its number where
-     the cleanup region could release it cannot be performed as a
-     single atomic operation.  Similarly, releasing the descriptor and
-     taking it out of the data structure normally responsible for
-     releasing it cannot be performed atomically.  There will always be
-     a window in which the descriptor cannot be released because it was
-     not stored in the cleanup handler argument yet, or it was already
-     taken out before releasing it.  It cannot be taken out after
-     release: an open descriptor could mean either that the descriptor
-     still has to be closed, or that it already did so but the
-     descriptor was reallocated by another thread or signal handler.
+     generally be marked as such.  Even if they attempted to protect the
+     file descriptor allocation and deallocation with cleanup regions,
+     allocating a new descriptor and storing its number where the
+     cleanup region could release it cannot be performed as a single
+     atomic operation.  Similarly, releasing the descriptor and taking
+     it out of the data structure normally responsible for releasing it
+     cannot be performed atomically.  There will always be a window in
+     which the descriptor cannot be released because it was not stored
+     in the cleanup handler argument yet, or it was already taken out
+     before releasing it.  It cannot be taken out after release: an open
+     descriptor could mean either that the descriptor still has to be
+     closed, or that it already did so but the descriptor was
+     reallocated by another thread or signal handler.
 
      Such leaks could be internally avoided, with some performance
-     penalty, by temporarily disabling asynchronous thread
-     cancellation.  However, since callers of allocation or
-     deallocation functions would have to do this themselves, to avoid
-     the same sort of leak in their own layer, it makes more sense for
-     the library to assume they are taking care of it than to impose a
-     performance penalty that is redundant when the problem is solved
-     in upper layers, and insufficient when it is not.
+     penalty, by temporarily disabling asynchronous thread cancellation.
+     However, since callers of allocation or deallocation functions
+     would have to do this themselves, to avoid the same sort of leak in
+     their own layer, it makes more sense for the library to assume they
+     are taking care of it than to impose a performance penalty that is
+     redundant when the problem is solved in upper layers, and
+     insufficient when it is not.
 
      This remark by itself does not cause a function to be regarded as
      AC-Unsafe.  However, cumulative effects of such leaks may pose a
@@ -3734,9 +3729,9 @@
      asynchronous cancellation for the duration of calls to such
      functions is recommended.
 
-   * `mem' 
+   * 'mem'
 
-     Functions annotated with `mem' as an AC-Safety issue may leak
+     Functions annotated with 'mem' as an AC-Safety issue may leak
      memory if asynchronous thread cancellation interrupts their
      execution.
 
@@ -3747,51 +3742,51 @@
      asynchronous cancellation, which these functions do not do.
 
      This remark does not by itself cause a function to be regarded as
-     generally AC-Unsafe.  However, cumulative effects of such leaks
-     may be severe enough for some programs that disabling asynchronous
+     generally AC-Unsafe.  However, cumulative effects of such leaks may
+     be severe enough for some programs that disabling asynchronous
      cancellation for the duration of calls to such functions may be
      required.
 
-   * `cwd' 
+   * 'cwd'
 
-     Functions marked with `cwd' as an MT-Safety issue may temporarily
+     Functions marked with 'cwd' as an MT-Safety issue may temporarily
      change the current working directory during their execution, which
      may cause relative pathnames to be resolved in unexpected ways in
      other threads or within asynchronous signal or cancellation
      handlers.
 
      This is not enough of a reason to mark so-marked functions as MT-
-     or AS-Unsafe, but when this behavior is optional (e.g., `nftw' with
-     `FTW_CHDIR'), avoiding the option may be a good alternative to
-     using full pathnames or file descriptor-relative (e.g. `openat')
+     or AS-Unsafe, but when this behavior is optional (e.g., 'nftw' with
+     'FTW_CHDIR'), avoiding the option may be a good alternative to
+     using full pathnames or file descriptor-relative (e.g.  'openat')
      system calls.
 
-   * `!posix' 
+   * '!posix'
 
      This remark, as an MT-, AS- or AC-Safety note to a function,
-     indicates the safety status of the function is known to differ
-     from the specified status in the POSIX standard.  For example,
-     POSIX does not require a function to be Safe, but our
-     implementation is, or vice-versa.
+     indicates the safety status of the function is known to differ from
+     the specified status in the POSIX standard.  For example, POSIX
+     does not require a function to be Safe, but our implementation is,
+     or vice-versa.
 
      For the time being, the absence of this remark does not imply the
      safety properties we documented are identical to those mandated by
      POSIX for the corresponding functions.
 
-   * `:identifier' 
+   * ':identifier'
 
      Annotations may sometimes be followed by identifiers, intended to
-     group several functions that e.g. access the data structures in an
-     unsafe way, as in `race' and `const', or to provide more specific
+     group several functions that e.g.  access the data structures in an
+     unsafe way, as in 'race' and 'const', or to provide more specific
      information, such as naming a signal in a function marked with
-     `sig'.  It is envisioned that it may be applied to `lock' and
-     `corrupt' as well in the future.
+     'sig'.  It is envisioned that it may be applied to 'lock' and
+     'corrupt' as well in the future.
 
      In most cases, the identifier will name a set of functions, but it
      may name global objects or function arguments, or identifiable
      properties or logical components associated with them, with a
-     notation such as e.g. `:buf(arg)' to denote a buffer associated
-     with the argument ARG, or `:tcattr(fd)' to denote the terminal
+     notation such as e.g.  ':buf(arg)' to denote a buffer associated
+     with the argument ARG, or ':tcattr(fd)' to denote the terminal
      attributes of a file descriptor FD.
 
      The most common use for identifiers is to provide logical groups of
@@ -3799,23 +3794,21 @@
      synchronization primitive in order to ensure safe operation in a
      given context.
 
-   * `/condition' 
+   * '/condition'
 
-     Some safety annotations may be conditional, in that they only
-     apply if a boolean expression involving arguments, global
-     variables or even the underlying kernel evaluates evaluates to
-     true.  Such conditions as `/hurd' or `/!linux!bsd' indicate the
-     preceding marker only applies when the underlying kernel is the
-     HURD, or when it is neither Linux nor a BSD kernel, respectively.
-     `/!ps' and `/one_per_line' indicate the preceding marker only
-     applies when argument PS is NULL, or global variable ONE_PER_LINE
-     is nonzero.
+     Some safety annotations may be conditional, in that they only apply
+     if a boolean expression involving arguments, global variables or
+     even the underlying kernel evaluates evaluates to true.  Such
+     conditions as '/hurd' or '/!linux!bsd' indicate the preceding
+     marker only applies when the underlying kernel is the HURD, or when
+     it is neither Linux nor a BSD kernel, respectively.  '/!ps' and
+     '/one_per_line' indicate the preceding marker only applies when
+     argument PS is NULL, or global variable ONE_PER_LINE is nonzero.
 
      When all marks that render a function unsafe are adorned with such
      conditions, and none of the named conditions hold, then the
      function can be regarded as safe.
 
-
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Berkeley Unix,  Next: SVID,  Prev: POSIX,  Up: Standards and Portability
 
@@ -3827,11 +3820,11 @@
 and 4.4 BSD Unix systems (also known as "Berkeley Unix") and from
 "SunOS" (a popular 4.2 BSD derivative that includes some Unix System V
 functionality).  These systems support most of the ISO C and POSIX
-facilities, and 4.4 BSD and newer releases of SunOS in fact support
-them all.
+facilities, and 4.4 BSD and newer releases of SunOS in fact support them
+all.
 
    The BSD facilities include symbolic links (*note Symbolic Links::),
-the `select' function (*note Waiting for I/O::), the BSD signal
+the 'select' function (*note Waiting for I/O::), the BSD signal
 functions (*note BSD Signal Handling::), and sockets (*note Sockets::).
 
 
@@ -3840,21 +3833,20 @@
 1.2.4 SVID (The System V Interface Description)
 -----------------------------------------------
 
-The "System V Interface Description" (SVID) is a document describing
-the AT&T Unix System V operating system.  It is to some extent a
-superset of the POSIX standard (*note POSIX::).
+The "System V Interface Description" (SVID) is a document describing the
+AT&T Unix System V operating system.  It is to some extent a superset of
+the POSIX standard (*note POSIX::).
 
    The GNU C Library defines most of the facilities required by the SVID
 that are not also required by the ISO C or POSIX standards, for
-compatibility with  System V Unix and other Unix systems (such as
-SunOS) which include these facilities.  However, many of the more
-obscure and less generally useful facilities required by the SVID are
-not included.  (In fact, Unix System V itself does not provide them
-all.)
+compatibility with System V Unix and other Unix systems (such as SunOS)
+which include these facilities.  However, many of the more obscure and
+less generally useful facilities required by the SVID are not included.
+(In fact, Unix System V itself does not provide them all.)
 
    The supported facilities from System V include the methods for
-inter-process communication and shared memory, the `hsearch' and
-`drand48' families of functions, `fmtmsg' and several of the
+inter-process communication and shared memory, the 'hsearch' and
+'drand48' families of functions, 'fmtmsg' and several of the
 mathematical functions.
 
 
@@ -3864,7 +3856,7 @@
 ----------------------------------------
 
 The X/Open Portability Guide, published by the X/Open Company, Ltd., is
-a more general standard than POSIX.  X/Open owns the Unix copyright and
+a more general standard than POSIX. X/Open owns the Unix copyright and
 the XPG specifies the requirements for systems which are intended to be
 a Unix system.
 
@@ -3875,9 +3867,9 @@
    The additions on top of POSIX are mainly derived from functionality
 available in System V and BSD systems.  Some of the really bad mistakes
 in System V systems were corrected, though.  Since fulfilling the XPG
-standard with the Unix extensions is a precondition for getting the
-Unix brand chances are good that the functionality is available on
-commercial systems.
+standard with the Unix extensions is a precondition for getting the Unix
+brand chances are good that the functionality is available on commercial
+systems.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Using the Library,  Next: Roadmap to the Manual,  Prev: Standards and Portability,  Up: Introduction
@@ -3905,28 +3897,28 @@
 ------------------
 
 Libraries for use by C programs really consist of two parts: "header
-files" that define types and macros and declare variables and
-functions; and the actual library or "archive" that contains the
-definitions of the variables and functions.
+files" that define types and macros and declare variables and functions;
+and the actual library or "archive" that contains the definitions of the
+variables and functions.
 
-   (Recall that in C, a "declaration" merely provides information that
-a function or variable exists and gives its type.  For a function
+   (Recall that in C, a "declaration" merely provides information that a
+function or variable exists and gives its type.  For a function
 declaration, information about the types of its arguments might be
 provided as well.  The purpose of declarations is to allow the compiler
 to correctly process references to the declared variables and functions.
 A "definition", on the other hand, actually allocates storage for a
-variable or says what a function does.)  
+variable or says what a function does.)
 
    In order to use the facilities in the GNU C Library, you should be
 sure that your program source files include the appropriate header
 files.  This is so that the compiler has declarations of these
-facilities available and can correctly process references to them.
-Once your program has been compiled, the linker resolves these
-references to the actual definitions provided in the archive file.
+facilities available and can correctly process references to them.  Once
+your program has been compiled, the linker resolves these references to
+the actual definitions provided in the archive file.
 
    Header files are included into a program source file by the
-`#include' preprocessor directive.  The C language supports two forms
-of this directive; the first,
+'#include' preprocessor directive.  The C language supports two forms of
+this directive; the first,
 
      #include "HEADER"
 
@@ -3937,19 +3929,19 @@
 
      #include <file.h>
 
-is typically used to include a header file `file.h' that contains
+is typically used to include a header file 'file.h' that contains
 definitions and declarations for a standard library.  This file would
 normally be installed in a standard place by your system administrator.
 You should use this second form for the C library header files.
 
-   Typically, `#include' directives are placed at the top of the C
+   Typically, '#include' directives are placed at the top of the C
 source file, before any other code.  If you begin your source files with
 some comments explaining what the code in the file does (a good idea),
-put the `#include' directives immediately afterwards, following the
+put the '#include' directives immediately afterwards, following the
 feature test macro definition (*note Feature Test Macros::).
 
-   For more information about the use of header files and `#include'
-directives, *note Header Files: (cpp.info)Header Files.
+   For more information about the use of header files and '#include'
+directives, *note (cpp.info)Header Files::.
 
    The GNU C Library provides several header files, each of which
 contains the type and macro definitions and variable and function
@@ -3967,13 +3959,13 @@
 program needs to include multiple header files, the order in which they
 are included doesn't matter.
 
-   *Compatibility Note:* Inclusion of standard header files in any
-order and any number of times works in any ISO C implementation.
-However, this has traditionally not been the case in many older C
+   *Compatibility Note:* Inclusion of standard header files in any order
+and any number of times works in any ISO C implementation.  However,
+this has traditionally not been the case in many older C
 implementations.
 
-   Strictly speaking, you don't _have to_ include a header file to use
-a function it declares; you could declare the function explicitly
+   Strictly speaking, you don't _have to_ include a header file to use a
+function it declares; you could declare the function explicitly
 yourself, according to the specifications in this manual.  But it is
 usually better to include the header file because it may define types
 and macros that are not otherwise available and because it may define
@@ -4004,26 +3996,26 @@
 function--perhaps to make your program easier to debug.  There are two
 ways you can do this:
 
-   * You can avoid a macro definition in a specific use by enclosing
-     the name of the function in parentheses.  This works because the
-     name of the function doesn't appear in a syntactic context where
-     it is recognizable as a macro call.
+   * You can avoid a macro definition in a specific use by enclosing the
+     name of the function in parentheses.  This works because the name
+     of the function doesn't appear in a syntactic context where it is
+     recognizable as a macro call.
 
    * You can suppress any macro definition for a whole source file by
-     using the `#undef' preprocessor directive, unless otherwise stated
+     using the '#undef' preprocessor directive, unless otherwise stated
      explicitly in the description of that facility.
 
-   For example, suppose the header file `stdlib.h' declares a function
-named `abs' with
+   For example, suppose the header file 'stdlib.h' declares a function
+named 'abs' with
 
      extern int abs (int);
 
-and also provides a macro definition for `abs'.  Then, in:
+and also provides a macro definition for 'abs'.  Then, in:
 
      #include <stdlib.h>
      int f (int *i) { return abs (++*i); }
 
-the reference to `abs' might refer to either a macro or a function.  On
+the reference to 'abs' might refer to either a macro or a function.  On
 the other hand, in each of the following examples the reference is to a
 function and not a macro.
 
@@ -4046,13 +4038,13 @@
 
 The names of all library types, macros, variables and functions that
 come from the ISO C standard are reserved unconditionally; your program
-*may not* redefine these names.  All other library names are reserved
-if your program explicitly includes the header file that defines or
+*may not* redefine these names.  All other library names are reserved if
+your program explicitly includes the header file that defines or
 declares them.  There are several reasons for these restrictions:
 
    * Other people reading your code could get very confused if you were
-     using a function named `exit' to do something completely different
-     from what the standard `exit' function does, for example.
+     using a function named 'exit' to do something completely different
+     from what the standard 'exit' function does, for example.
      Preventing this situation helps to make your programs easier to
      understand and contributes to modularity and maintainability.
 
@@ -4063,17 +4055,17 @@
 
    * It allows the compiler to do whatever special optimizations it
      pleases on calls to these functions, without the possibility that
-     they may have been redefined by the user.  Some library
-     facilities, such as those for dealing with variadic arguments
-     (*note Variadic Functions::) and non-local exits (*note Non-Local
-     Exits::), actually require a considerable amount of cooperation on
-     the part of the C compiler, and with respect to the
-     implementation, it might be easier for the compiler to treat these
-     as built-in parts of the language.
+     they may have been redefined by the user.  Some library facilities,
+     such as those for dealing with variadic arguments (*note Variadic
+     Functions::) and non-local exits (*note Non-Local Exits::),
+     actually require a considerable amount of cooperation on the part
+     of the C compiler, and with respect to the implementation, it might
+     be easier for the compiler to treat these as built-in parts of the
+     language.
 
    In addition to the names documented in this manual, reserved names
 include all external identifiers (global functions and variables) that
-begin with an underscore (`_') and all identifiers regardless of use
+begin with an underscore ('_') and all identifiers regardless of use
 that begin with either two underscores or an underscore followed by a
 capital letter are reserved names.  This is so that the library and
 header files can define functions, variables, and macros for internal
@@ -4085,61 +4077,61 @@
 they do raise the possibility of conflict with future versions of the C
 or POSIX standards, so you should avoid these names.
 
-   * Names beginning with a capital `E' followed a digit or uppercase
+   * Names beginning with a capital 'E' followed a digit or uppercase
      letter may be used for additional error code names.  *Note Error
      Reporting::.
 
-   * Names that begin with either `is' or `to' followed by a lowercase
+   * Names that begin with either 'is' or 'to' followed by a lowercase
      letter may be used for additional character testing and conversion
      functions.  *Note Character Handling::.
 
-   * Names that begin with `LC_' followed by an uppercase letter may be
+   * Names that begin with 'LC_' followed by an uppercase letter may be
      used for additional macros specifying locale attributes.  *Note
      Locales::.
 
    * Names of all existing mathematics functions (*note Mathematics::)
-     suffixed with `f' or `l' are reserved for corresponding functions
-     that operate on `float' and `long double' arguments, respectively.
+     suffixed with 'f' or 'l' are reserved for corresponding functions
+     that operate on 'float' and 'long double' arguments, respectively.
 
-   * Names that begin with `SIG' followed by an uppercase letter are
+   * Names that begin with 'SIG' followed by an uppercase letter are
      reserved for additional signal names.  *Note Standard Signals::.
 
-   * Names that begin with `SIG_' followed by an uppercase letter are
+   * Names that begin with 'SIG_' followed by an uppercase letter are
      reserved for additional signal actions.  *Note Basic Signal
      Handling::.
 
-   * Names beginning with `str', `mem', or `wcs' followed by a
-     lowercase letter are reserved for additional string and array
-     functions.  *Note String and Array Utilities::.
+   * Names beginning with 'str', 'mem', or 'wcs' followed by a lowercase
+     letter are reserved for additional string and array functions.
+     *Note String and Array Utilities::.
 
-   * Names that end with `_t' are reserved for additional type names.
+   * Names that end with '_t' are reserved for additional type names.
 
    In addition, some individual header files reserve names beyond those
 that they actually define.  You only need to worry about these
 restrictions if your program includes that particular header file.
 
-   * The header file `dirent.h' reserves names prefixed with `d_'.  
+   * The header file 'dirent.h' reserves names prefixed with 'd_'.
 
-   * The header file `fcntl.h' reserves names prefixed with `l_', `F_',
-     `O_', and `S_'.  
+   * The header file 'fcntl.h' reserves names prefixed with 'l_', 'F_',
+     'O_', and 'S_'.
 
-   * The header file `grp.h' reserves names prefixed with `gr_'.  
+   * The header file 'grp.h' reserves names prefixed with 'gr_'.
 
-   * The header file `limits.h' reserves names suffixed with `_MAX'.  
+   * The header file 'limits.h' reserves names suffixed with '_MAX'.
 
-   * The header file `pwd.h' reserves names prefixed with `pw_'.  
+   * The header file 'pwd.h' reserves names prefixed with 'pw_'.
 
-   * The header file `signal.h' reserves names prefixed with `sa_' and
-     `SA_'.  
+   * The header file 'signal.h' reserves names prefixed with 'sa_' and
+     'SA_'.
 
-   * The header file `sys/stat.h' reserves names prefixed with `st_'
-     and `S_'.  
+   * The header file 'sys/stat.h' reserves names prefixed with 'st_' and
+     'S_'.
 
-   * The header file `sys/times.h' reserves names prefixed with `tms_'.  
+   * The header file 'sys/times.h' reserves names prefixed with 'tms_'.
 
-   * The header file `termios.h' reserves names prefixed with `c_',
-     `V', `I', `O', and `TC'; and names prefixed with `B' followed by a
-     digit.  
+   * The header file 'termios.h' reserves names prefixed with 'c_', 'V',
+     'I', 'O', and 'TC'; and names prefixed with 'B' followed by a
+     digit.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Feature Test Macros,  Prev: Reserved Names,  Up: Using the Library
@@ -4150,19 +4142,18 @@
 The exact set of features available when you compile a source file is
 controlled by which "feature test macros" you define.
 
-   If you compile your programs using `gcc -ansi', you get only the
-ISO C library features, unless you explicitly request additional
-features by defining one or more of the feature macros.  *Note GNU CC
-Command Options: (gcc.info)Invoking GCC, for more information about GCC
-options.
+   If you compile your programs using 'gcc -ansi', you get only the ISO C
+library features, unless you explicitly request additional features by
+defining one or more of the feature macros.  *Note GNU CC Command
+Options: (gcc.info)Invoking GCC, for more information about GCC options.
 
-   You should define these macros by using `#define' preprocessor
+   You should define these macros by using '#define' preprocessor
 directives at the top of your source code files.  These directives
-_must_ come before any `#include' of a system header file.  It is best
+_must_ come before any '#include' of a system header file.  It is best
 to make them the very first thing in the file, preceded only by
-comments.  You could also use the `-D' option to GCC, but it's better
-if you make the source files indicate their own meaning in a
-self-contained way.
+comments.  You could also use the '-D' option to GCC, but it's better if
+you make the source files indicate their own meaning in a self-contained
+way.
 
    This system exists to allow the library to conform to multiple
 standards.  Although the different standards are often described as
@@ -4170,46 +4161,46 @@
 standards require functions with names that smaller ones reserve to the
 user program.  This is not mere pedantry -- it has been a problem in
 practice.  For instance, some non-GNU programs define functions named
-`getline' that have nothing to do with this library's `getline'.  They
+'getline' that have nothing to do with this library's 'getline'.  They
 would not be compilable if all features were enabled indiscriminately.
 
    This should not be used to verify that a program conforms to a
 limited standard.  It is insufficient for this purpose, as it will not
-protect you from including header files outside the standard, or
-relying on semantics undefined within the standard.
+protect you from including header files outside the standard, or relying
+on semantics undefined within the standard.
 
  -- Macro: _POSIX_SOURCE
      If you define this macro, then the functionality from the POSIX.1
      standard (IEEE Standard 1003.1) is available, as well as all of the
      ISO C facilities.
 
-     The state of `_POSIX_SOURCE' is irrelevant if you define the macro
-     `_POSIX_C_SOURCE' to a positive integer.
+     The state of '_POSIX_SOURCE' is irrelevant if you define the macro
+     '_POSIX_C_SOURCE' to a positive integer.
 
  -- Macro: _POSIX_C_SOURCE
      Define this macro to a positive integer to control which POSIX
      functionality is made available.  The greater the value of this
      macro, the more functionality is made available.
 
-     If you define this macro to a value greater than or equal to `1',
+     If you define this macro to a value greater than or equal to '1',
      then the functionality from the 1990 edition of the POSIX.1
      standard (IEEE Standard 1003.1-1990) is made available.
 
-     If you define this macro to a value greater than or equal to `2',
+     If you define this macro to a value greater than or equal to '2',
      then the functionality from the 1992 edition of the POSIX.2
      standard (IEEE Standard 1003.2-1992) is made available.
 
      If you define this macro to a value greater than or equal to
-     `199309L', then the functionality from the 1993 edition of the
+     '199309L', then the functionality from the 1993 edition of the
      POSIX.1b standard (IEEE Standard 1003.1b-1993) is made available.
 
-     Greater values for `_POSIX_C_SOURCE' will enable future extensions.
+     Greater values for '_POSIX_C_SOURCE' will enable future extensions.
      The POSIX standards process will define these values as necessary,
      and the GNU C Library should support them some time after they
      become standardized.  The 1996 edition of POSIX.1 (ISO/IEC 9945-1:
-     1996) states that if you define `_POSIX_C_SOURCE' to a value
-     greater than or equal to `199506L', then the functionality from
-     the 1996 edition is made available.
+     1996) states that if you define '_POSIX_C_SOURCE' to a value
+     greater than or equal to '199506L', then the functionality from the
+     1996 edition is made available.
 
  -- Macro: _BSD_SOURCE
      If you define this macro, functionality derived from 4.3 BSD Unix
@@ -4224,26 +4215,26 @@
  -- Macro: _XOPEN_SOURCE_EXTENDED
      If you define this macro, functionality described in the X/Open
      Portability Guide is included.  This is a superset of the POSIX.1
-     and POSIX.2 functionality and in fact `_POSIX_SOURCE' and
-     `_POSIX_C_SOURCE' are automatically defined.
+     and POSIX.2 functionality and in fact '_POSIX_SOURCE' and
+     '_POSIX_C_SOURCE' are automatically defined.
 
      As the unification of all Unices, functionality only available in
      BSD and SVID is also included.
 
-     If the macro `_XOPEN_SOURCE_EXTENDED' is also defined, even more
+     If the macro '_XOPEN_SOURCE_EXTENDED' is also defined, even more
      functionality is available.  The extra functions will make all
      functions available which are necessary for the X/Open Unix brand.
 
-     If the macro `_XOPEN_SOURCE' has the value 500 this includes all
+     If the macro '_XOPEN_SOURCE' has the value 500 this includes all
      functionality described so far plus some new definitions from the
      Single Unix Specification, version 2.
 
  -- Macro: _LARGEFILE_SOURCE
      If this macro is defined some extra functions are available which
      rectify a few shortcomings in all previous standards.
-     Specifically, the functions `fseeko' and `ftello' are available.
+     Specifically, the functions 'fseeko' and 'ftello' are available.
      Without these functions the difference between the ISO C interface
-     (`fseek', `ftell') and the low-level POSIX interface (`lseek')
+     ('fseek', 'ftell') and the low-level POSIX interface ('lseek')
      would lead to problems.
 
      This macro was introduced as part of the Large File Support
@@ -4252,42 +4243,41 @@
  -- Macro: _LARGEFILE64_SOURCE
      If you define this macro an additional set of functions is made
      available which enables 32 bit systems to use files of sizes beyond
-     the usual limit of 2GB.  This interface is not available if the
+     the usual limit of 2GB. This interface is not available if the
      system does not support files that large.  On systems where the
      natural file size limit is greater than 2GB (i.e., on 64 bit
      systems) the new functions are identical to the replaced functions.
 
      The new functionality is made available by a new set of types and
      functions which replace the existing ones.  The names of these new
-     objects contain `64' to indicate the intention, e.g., `off_t' vs.
-     `off64_t' and `fseeko' vs. `fseeko64'.
+     objects contain '64' to indicate the intention, e.g., 'off_t' vs.
+     'off64_t' and 'fseeko' vs.  'fseeko64'.
 
      This macro was introduced as part of the Large File Support
-     extension (LFS).  It is a transition interface for the period when
-     64 bit offsets are not generally used (see `_FILE_OFFSET_BITS').
+     extension (LFS). It is a transition interface for the period when 64 bit
+     offsets are not generally used (see '_FILE_OFFSET_BITS').
 
  -- Macro: _FILE_OFFSET_BITS
      This macro determines which file system interface shall be used,
-     one replacing the other.  Whereas `_LARGEFILE64_SOURCE' makes the
-     64 bit interface available as an additional interface,
-     `_FILE_OFFSET_BITS' allows the 64 bit interface to replace the old
-     interface.
+     one replacing the other.  Whereas '_LARGEFILE64_SOURCE' makes the 64 bit
+     interface available as an additional interface, '_FILE_OFFSET_BITS'
+     allows the 64 bit interface to replace the old interface.
 
-     If `_FILE_OFFSET_BITS' is undefined, or if it is defined to the
-     value `32', nothing changes.  The 32 bit interface is used and
-     types like `off_t' have a size of 32 bits on 32 bit systems.
+     If '_FILE_OFFSET_BITS' is undefined, or if it is defined to the
+     value '32', nothing changes.  The 32 bit interface is used and
+     types like 'off_t' have a size of 32 bits on 32 bit systems.
 
-     If the macro is defined to the value `64', the large file interface
+     If the macro is defined to the value '64', the large file interface
      replaces the old interface.  I.e., the functions are not made
      available under different names (as they are with
-     `_LARGEFILE64_SOURCE').  Instead the old function names now
-     reference the new functions, e.g., a call to `fseeko' now indeed
-     calls `fseeko64'.
+     '_LARGEFILE64_SOURCE').  Instead the old function names now
+     reference the new functions, e.g., a call to 'fseeko' now indeed
+     calls 'fseeko64'.
 
      This macro should only be selected if the system provides
      mechanisms for handling large files.  On 64 bit systems this macro
-     has no effect since the `*64' functions are identical to the
-     normal functions.
+     has no effect since the '*64' functions are identical to the normal
+     functions.
 
      This macro was introduced as part of the Large File Support
      extension (LFS).
@@ -4295,25 +4285,25 @@
  -- Macro: _ISOC99_SOURCE
      Until the revised ISO C standard is widely adopted the new features
      are not automatically enabled.  The GNU C Library nevertheless has
-     a complete implementation of the new standard and to enable the
-     new features the macro `_ISOC99_SOURCE' should be defined.
+     a complete implementation of the new standard and to enable the new
+     features the macro '_ISOC99_SOURCE' should be defined.
 
  -- Macro: _GNU_SOURCE
-     If you define this macro, everything is included: ISO C89,
-     ISO C99, POSIX.1, POSIX.2, BSD, SVID, X/Open, LFS, and GNU
-     extensions.  In the cases where POSIX.1 conflicts with BSD, the
-     POSIX definitions take precedence.
+     If you define this macro, everything is included: ISO C89, ISO C99,
+     POSIX.1, POSIX.2, BSD, SVID, X/Open, LFS, and GNU extensions.  In
+     the cases where POSIX.1 conflicts with BSD, the POSIX definitions
+     take precedence.
 
  -- Macro: _DEFAULT_SOURCE
      If you define this macro, most features are included apart from
      X/Open, LFS and GNU extensions; the effect is similar to defining
-     `_POSIX_C_SOURCE' to `200809L' and `_POSIX_SOURCE',
-     `_SVID_SOURCE', and `_BSD_SOURCE' to 1.  Defining this macro, on
-     its own and without using compiler options such as `-ansi' or
-     `-std=c99', has the same effect as not defining any feature test
-     macros; defining it together with other feature test macros, or
-     when options such as `-ansi' are used, enables those features even
-     when the other options would otherwise cause them to be disabled.
+     '_POSIX_C_SOURCE' to '200809L' and '_POSIX_SOURCE', '_SVID_SOURCE',
+     and '_BSD_SOURCE' to 1.  Defining this macro, on its own and
+     without using compiler options such as '-ansi' or '-std=c99', has
+     the same effect as not defining any feature test macros; defining
+     it together with other feature test macros, or when options such as
+     '-ansi' are used, enables those features even when the other
+     options would otherwise cause them to be disabled.
 
  -- Macro: _REENTRANT
  -- Macro: _THREAD_SAFE
@@ -4328,17 +4318,17 @@
      compiling this it must have been specified to compile as thread
      safe.
 
-   We recommend you use `_GNU_SOURCE' in new programs.  If you don't
-specify the `-ansi' option to GCC, or other conformance options such as
-`-std=c99', and don't define any of these macros explicitly, the effect
-is the same as defining `_DEFAULT_SOURCE' to 1.
+   We recommend you use '_GNU_SOURCE' in new programs.  If you don't
+specify the '-ansi' option to GCC, or other conformance options such as
+'-std=c99', and don't define any of these macros explicitly, the effect
+is the same as defining '_DEFAULT_SOURCE' to 1.
 
    When you define a feature test macro to request a larger class of
 features, it is harmless to define in addition a feature test macro for
 a subset of those features.  For example, if you define
-`_POSIX_C_SOURCE', then defining `_POSIX_SOURCE' as well has no effect.
-Likewise, if you define `_GNU_SOURCE', then defining either
-`_POSIX_SOURCE' or `_POSIX_C_SOURCE' or `_SVID_SOURCE' as well has no
+'_POSIX_C_SOURCE', then defining '_POSIX_SOURCE' as well has no effect.
+Likewise, if you define '_GNU_SOURCE', then defining either
+'_POSIX_SOURCE' or '_POSIX_C_SOURCE' or '_SVID_SOURCE' as well has no
 effect.
 
 
@@ -4354,9 +4344,9 @@
      library are reported.
 
    * *note Language Features::, contains information about library
-     support for standard parts of the C language, including things
-     like the `sizeof' operator and the symbolic constant `NULL', how
-     to write functions accepting variable numbers of arguments, and
+     support for standard parts of the C language, including things like
+     the 'sizeof' operator and the symbolic constant 'NULL', how to
+     write functions accepting variable numbers of arguments, and
      constants describing the ranges and other properties of the
      numerical types.  There is also a simple debugging mechanism which
      allows you to put assertions in your code, and have diagnostic
@@ -4369,7 +4359,7 @@
      instead, and manipulate it via pointers.
 
    * *note Character Handling::, contains information about character
-     classification functions (such as `isspace') and functions for
+     classification functions (such as 'isspace') and functions for
      performing case conversion.
 
    * *note String and Array Utilities::, has descriptions of functions
@@ -4382,30 +4372,30 @@
      concepts such as file names.
 
    * *note I/O on Streams::, describes I/O operations involving streams
-     (or `FILE *' objects).  These are the normal C library functions
-     from `stdio.h'.
+     (or 'FILE *' objects).  These are the normal C library functions
+     from 'stdio.h'.
 
-   * *note Low-Level I/O::, contains information about I/O operations
-     on file descriptors.  File descriptors are a lower-level mechanism
+   * *note Low-Level I/O::, contains information about I/O operations on
+     file descriptors.  File descriptors are a lower-level mechanism
      specific to the Unix family of operating systems.
 
    * *note File System Interface::, has descriptions of operations on
      entire files, such as functions for deleting and renaming them and
      for creating new directories.  This chapter also contains
-     information about how you can access the attributes of a file,
-     such as its owner and file protection modes.
+     information about how you can access the attributes of a file, such
+     as its owner and file protection modes.
 
    * *note Pipes and FIFOs::, contains information about simple
      interprocess communication mechanisms.  Pipes allow communication
-     between two related processes (such as between a parent and
-     child), while FIFOs allow communication between processes sharing
-     a common file system on the same machine.
+     between two related processes (such as between a parent and child),
+     while FIFOs allow communication between processes sharing a common
+     file system on the same machine.
 
    * *note Sockets::, describes a more complicated interprocess
      communication mechanism that allows processes running on different
-     machines to communicate over a network.  This chapter also
-     contains information about Internet host addressing and how to use
-     the system network databases.
+     machines to communicate over a network.  This chapter also contains
+     information about Internet host addressing and how to use the
+     system network databases.
 
    * *note Low-Level Terminal Interface::, describes how you can change
      the attributes of a terminal device.  If you want to disable echo
@@ -4417,8 +4407,8 @@
      and exponential functions on floating-point numbers.
 
    * *note Low-Level Arithmetic Functions: Arithmetic, describes
-     functions for simple arithmetic, analysis of floating-point
-     values, and reading numbers from strings.
+     functions for simple arithmetic, analysis of floating-point values,
+     and reading numbers from strings.
 
    * *note Searching and Sorting::, contains information about functions
      for searching and sorting arrays.  You can use these functions on
@@ -4429,21 +4419,21 @@
      as the shell does.
 
    * *note Date and Time::, describes functions for measuring both
-     calendar time and CPU time, as well as functions for setting
-     alarms and timers.
+     calendar time and CPU time, as well as functions for setting alarms
+     and timers.
 
    * *note Character Set Handling::, contains information about
      manipulating characters and strings using character sets larger
-     than will fit in the usual `char' data type.
+     than will fit in the usual 'char' data type.
 
    * *note Locales::, describes how selecting a particular country or
      language affects the behavior of the library.  For example, the
      locale affects collation sequences for strings and how monetary
      values are formatted.
 
-   * *note Non-Local Exits::, contains descriptions of the `setjmp' and
-     `longjmp' functions.  These functions provide a facility for
-     `goto'-like jumps which can jump from one function to another.
+   * *note Non-Local Exits::, contains descriptions of the 'setjmp' and
+     'longjmp' functions.  These functions provide a facility for
+     'goto'-like jumps which can jump from one function to another.
 
    * *note Signal Handling::, tells you all about signals--what they
      are, how to establish a handler that is called when a particular
@@ -4474,9 +4464,9 @@
      getting information about the hardware and software configuration
      your program is executing under.
 
-   * *note System Configuration::, tells you how you can get
-     information about various operating system limits.  Most of these
-     parameters are provided for compatibility with POSIX.
+   * *note System Configuration::, tells you how you can get information
+     about various operating system limits.  Most of these parameters
+     are provided for compatibility with POSIX.
 
    * *note Library Summary::, gives a summary of all the functions,
      variables, and macros in the library, with complete data types and
@@ -4490,12 +4480,12 @@
      library to a new system.
 
    If you already know the name of the facility you are interested in,
-you can look it up in *note Library Summary::.  This gives you a
-summary of its syntax and a pointer to where you can find a more
-detailed description.  This appendix is particularly useful if you just
-want to verify the order and type of arguments to a function, for
-example.  It also tells you what standard or system each function,
-variable, or macro is derived from.
+you can look it up in *note Library Summary::.  This gives you a summary
+of its syntax and a pointer to where you can find a more detailed
+description.  This appendix is particularly useful if you just want to
+verify the order and type of arguments to a function, for example.  It
+also tells you what standard or system each function, variable, or macro
+is derived from.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Error Reporting,  Next: Memory,  Prev: Introduction,  Up: Top
@@ -4510,7 +4500,7 @@
 other appropriate action if the call to the library function failed.
 
    This chapter describes how the error reporting facility works.  Your
-program should include the header file `errno.h' to use this facility.  
+program should include the header file 'errno.h' to use this facility.
 
 * Menu:
 
@@ -4526,77 +4516,77 @@
 =======================
 
 Most library functions return a special value to indicate that they have
-failed.  The special value is typically `-1', a null pointer, or a
-constant such as `EOF' that is defined for that purpose.  But this
+failed.  The special value is typically '-1', a null pointer, or a
+constant such as 'EOF' that is defined for that purpose.  But this
 return value tells you only that an error has occurred.  To find out
 what kind of error it was, you need to look at the error code stored in
-the variable `errno'.  This variable is declared in the header file
-`errno.h'.  
+the variable 'errno'.  This variable is declared in the header file
+'errno.h'.
 
  -- Variable: volatile int errno
-     The variable `errno' contains the system error number.  You can
-     change the value of `errno'.
+     The variable 'errno' contains the system error number.  You can
+     change the value of 'errno'.
 
-     Since `errno' is declared `volatile', it might be changed
+     Since 'errno' is declared 'volatile', it might be changed
      asynchronously by a signal handler; see *note Defining Handlers::.
      However, a properly written signal handler saves and restores the
-     value of `errno', so you generally do not need to worry about this
+     value of 'errno', so you generally do not need to worry about this
      possibility except when writing signal handlers.
 
-     The initial value of `errno' at program startup is zero.  Many
+     The initial value of 'errno' at program startup is zero.  Many
      library functions are guaranteed to set it to certain nonzero
      values when they encounter certain kinds of errors.  These error
      conditions are listed for each function.  These functions do not
-     change `errno' when they succeed; thus, the value of `errno' after
+     change 'errno' when they succeed; thus, the value of 'errno' after
      a successful call is not necessarily zero, and you should not use
-     `errno' to determine _whether_ a call failed.  The proper way to
-     do that is documented for each function.  _If_ the call failed,
-     you can examine `errno'.
+     'errno' to determine _whether_ a call failed.  The proper way to do
+     that is documented for each function.  _If_ the call failed, you
+     can examine 'errno'.
 
-     Many library functions can set `errno' to a nonzero value as a
+     Many library functions can set 'errno' to a nonzero value as a
      result of calling other library functions which might fail.  You
-     should assume that any library function might alter `errno' when
+     should assume that any library function might alter 'errno' when
      the function returns an error.
 
-     *Portability Note:* ISO C specifies `errno' as a "modifiable
+     *Portability Note:* ISO C specifies 'errno' as a "modifiable
      lvalue" rather than as a variable, permitting it to be implemented
      as a macro.  For example, its expansion might involve a function
-     call, like `*__errno_location ()'.  In fact, that is what it is on
-     GNU/Linux and GNU/Hurd systems.  The GNU C Library, on each
-     system, does whatever is right for the particular system.
+     call, like '*__errno_location ()'.  In fact, that is what it is on
+     GNU/Linux and GNU/Hurd systems.  The GNU C Library, on each system,
+     does whatever is right for the particular system.
 
-     There are a few library functions, like `sqrt' and `atan', that
+     There are a few library functions, like 'sqrt' and 'atan', that
      return a perfectly legitimate value in case of an error, but also
-     set `errno'.  For these functions, if you want to check to see
-     whether an error occurred, the recommended method is to set `errno'
+     set 'errno'.  For these functions, if you want to check to see
+     whether an error occurred, the recommended method is to set 'errno'
      to zero before calling the function, and then check its value
      afterward.
 
    All the error codes have symbolic names; they are macros defined in
-`errno.h'.  The names start with `E' and an upper-case letter or digit;
+'errno.h'.  The names start with 'E' and an upper-case letter or digit;
 you should consider names of this form to be reserved names.  *Note
 Reserved Names::.
 
    The error code values are all positive integers and are all distinct,
-with one exception: `EWOULDBLOCK' and `EAGAIN' are the same.  Since the
-values are distinct, you can use them as labels in a `switch'
-statement; just don't use both `EWOULDBLOCK' and `EAGAIN'.  Your
-program should not make any other assumptions about the specific values
-of these symbolic constants.
+with one exception: 'EWOULDBLOCK' and 'EAGAIN' are the same.  Since the
+values are distinct, you can use them as labels in a 'switch' statement;
+just don't use both 'EWOULDBLOCK' and 'EAGAIN'.  Your program should not
+make any other assumptions about the specific values of these symbolic
+constants.
 
-   The value of `errno' doesn't necessarily have to correspond to any
-of these macros, since some library functions might return other error
+   The value of 'errno' doesn't necessarily have to correspond to any of
+these macros, since some library functions might return other error
 codes of their own for other situations.  The only values that are
 guaranteed to be meaningful for a particular library function are the
 ones that this manual lists for that function.
 
    Except on GNU/Hurd systems, almost any system call can return
-`EFAULT' if it is given an invalid pointer as an argument.  Since this
+'EFAULT' if it is given an invalid pointer as an argument.  Since this
 could only happen as a result of a bug in your program, and since it
 will not happen on GNU/Hurd systems, we have saved space by not
-mentioning `EFAULT' in the descriptions of individual functions.
+mentioning 'EFAULT' in the descriptions of individual functions.
 
-   In some Unix systems, many system calls can also return `EFAULT' if
+   In some Unix systems, many system calls can also return 'EFAULT' if
 given as an argument a pointer into the stack, and the kernel for some
 obscure reason fails in its attempt to extend the stack.  If this ever
 happens, you should probably try using statically or dynamically
@@ -4608,7 +4598,7 @@
 2.2 Error Codes
 ===============
 
-The error code macros are defined in the header file `errno.h'.  All of
+The error code macros are defined in the header file 'errno.h'.  All of
 them expand into integer constant values.  Some of these error codes
 can't occur on GNU systems, but they can occur using the GNU C Library
 on other systems.
@@ -4632,7 +4622,7 @@
      try the call again.
 
      You can choose to have functions resume after a signal that is
-     handled, rather than failing with `EINTR'; see *note Interrupted
+     handled, rather than failing with 'EINTR'; see *note Interrupted
      Primitives::.
 
  -- Macro: int EIO
@@ -4647,13 +4637,13 @@
 
  -- Macro: int E2BIG
      Argument list too long; used when the arguments passed to a new
-     program being executed with one of the `exec' functions (*note
+     program being executed with one of the 'exec' functions (*note
      Executing a File::) occupy too much memory space.  This condition
      never arises on GNU/Hurd systems.
 
  -- Macro: int ENOEXEC
      Invalid executable file format.  This condition is detected by the
-     `exec' functions; see *note Executing a File::.
+     'exec' functions; see *note Executing a File::.
 
  -- Macro: int EBADF
      Bad file descriptor; for example, I/O on a descriptor that has been
@@ -4681,8 +4671,8 @@
      operation.
 
  -- Macro: int EFAULT
-     Bad address; an invalid pointer was detected.  On GNU/Hurd
-     systems, this error never happens; you get a signal instead.
+     Bad address; an invalid pointer was detected.  On GNU/Hurd systems,
+     this error never happens; you get a signal instead.
 
  -- Macro: int ENOTBLK
      A file that isn't a block special file was given in a situation
@@ -4690,9 +4680,9 @@
      as a file system in Unix gives this error.
 
  -- Macro: int EBUSY
-     Resource busy; a system resource that can't be shared is already
-     in use.  For example, if you try to delete a file that is the root
-     of a currently mounted filesystem, you get this error.
+     Resource busy; a system resource that can't be shared is already in
+     use.  For example, if you try to delete a file that is the root of
+     a currently mounted filesystem, you get this error.
 
  -- Macro: int EEXIST
      File exists; an existing file was specified in a context where it
@@ -4700,8 +4690,8 @@
 
  -- Macro: int EXDEV
      An attempt to make an improper link across file systems was
-     detected.  This happens not only when you use `link' (*note Hard
-     Links::) but also when you rename a file with `rename' (*note
+     detected.  This happens not only when you use 'link' (*note Hard
+     Links::) but also when you rename a file with 'rename' (*note
      Renaming Files::).
 
  -- Macro: int ENODEV
@@ -4726,8 +4716,8 @@
 
      In BSD and GNU, the number of open files is controlled by a
      resource limit that can usually be increased.  If you get this
-     error, you might want to increase the `RLIMIT_NOFILE' limit or
-     make it unlimited; *note Limits on Resources::.
+     error, you might want to increase the 'RLIMIT_NOFILE' limit or make
+     it unlimited; *note Limits on Resources::.
 
  -- Macro: int ENFILE
      There are too many distinct file openings in the entire system.
@@ -4743,9 +4733,9 @@
      An attempt to execute a file that is currently open for writing, or
      write to a file that is currently being executed.  Often using a
      debugger to run a program is considered having it open for writing
-     and will cause this error.  (The name stands for "text file
-     busy".)  This is not an error on GNU/Hurd systems; the text is
-     copied as necessary.
+     and will cause this error.  (The name stands for "text file busy".)
+     This is not an error on GNU/Hurd systems; the text is copied as
+     necessary.
 
  -- Macro: int EFBIG
      File too big; the size of a file would be larger than allowed by
@@ -4763,20 +4753,19 @@
 
  -- Macro: int EMLINK
      Too many links; the link count of a single file would become too
-     large.  `rename' can cause this error if the file being renamed
+     large.  'rename' can cause this error if the file being renamed
      already has as many links as it can take (*note Renaming Files::).
 
  -- Macro: int EPIPE
      Broken pipe; there is no process reading from the other end of a
      pipe.  Every library function that returns this error code also
-     generates a `SIGPIPE' signal; this signal terminates the program
-     if not handled or blocked.  Thus, your program will never actually
-     see `EPIPE' unless it has handled or blocked `SIGPIPE'.
+     generates a 'SIGPIPE' signal; this signal terminates the program if
+     not handled or blocked.  Thus, your program will never actually see
+     'EPIPE' unless it has handled or blocked 'SIGPIPE'.
 
  -- Macro: int EDOM
-     Domain error; used by mathematical functions when an argument
-     value does not fall into the domain over which the function is
-     defined.
+     Domain error; used by mathematical functions when an argument value
+     does not fall into the domain over which the function is defined.
 
  -- Macro: int ERANGE
      Range error; used by mathematical functions when the result value
@@ -4784,7 +4773,7 @@
 
  -- Macro: int EAGAIN
      Resource temporarily unavailable; the call might work if you try
-     again later.  The macro `EWOULDBLOCK' is another name for `EAGAIN';
+     again later.  The macro 'EWOULDBLOCK' is another name for 'EAGAIN';
      they are always the same in the GNU C Library.
 
      This error can happen in a few different situations:
@@ -4793,39 +4782,39 @@
           has non-blocking mode selected.  Trying the same operation
           again will block until some external condition makes it
           possible to read, write, or connect (whatever the operation).
-          You can use `select' to find out when the operation will be
+          You can use 'select' to find out when the operation will be
           possible; *note Waiting for I/O::.
 
           *Portability Note:* In many older Unix systems, this condition
-          was indicated by `EWOULDBLOCK', which was a distinct error
-          code different from `EAGAIN'.  To make your program portable,
+          was indicated by 'EWOULDBLOCK', which was a distinct error
+          code different from 'EAGAIN'.  To make your program portable,
           you should check for both codes and treat them the same.
 
         * A temporary resource shortage made an operation impossible.
-          `fork' can return this error.  It indicates that the shortage
+          'fork' can return this error.  It indicates that the shortage
           is expected to pass, so your program can try the call again
-          later and it may succeed.  It is probably a good idea to
-          delay for a few seconds before trying it again, to allow time
-          for other processes to release scarce resources.  Such
-          shortages are usually fairly serious and affect the whole
-          system, so usually an interactive program should report the
-          error to the user and return to its command loop.
+          later and it may succeed.  It is probably a good idea to delay
+          for a few seconds before trying it again, to allow time for
+          other processes to release scarce resources.  Such shortages
+          are usually fairly serious and affect the whole system, so
+          usually an interactive program should report the error to the
+          user and return to its command loop.
 
  -- Macro: int EWOULDBLOCK
-     In the GNU C Library, this is another name for `EAGAIN' (above).
+     In the GNU C Library, this is another name for 'EAGAIN' (above).
      The values are always the same, on every operating system.
 
-     C libraries in many older Unix systems have `EWOULDBLOCK' as a
+     C libraries in many older Unix systems have 'EWOULDBLOCK' as a
      separate error code.
 
  -- Macro: int EINPROGRESS
      An operation that cannot complete immediately was initiated on an
      object that has non-blocking mode selected.  Some functions that
-     must always block (such as `connect'; *note Connecting::) never
-     return `EAGAIN'.  Instead, they return `EINPROGRESS' to indicate
+     must always block (such as 'connect'; *note Connecting::) never
+     return 'EAGAIN'.  Instead, they return 'EINPROGRESS' to indicate
      that the operation has begun and will take some time.  Attempts to
-     manipulate the object before the call completes return `EALREADY'.
-     You can use the `select' function to find out when the pending
+     manipulate the object before the call completes return 'EALREADY'.
+     You can use the 'select' function to find out when the pending
      operation has completed; *note Waiting for I/O::.
 
  -- Macro: int EALREADY
@@ -4858,11 +4847,11 @@
 
  -- Macro: int EOPNOTSUPP
      The operation you requested is not supported.  Some socket
-     functions don't make sense for all types of sockets, and others
-     may not be implemented for all communications protocols.  On
-     GNU/Hurd systems, this error can happen for many calls when the
-     object does not support the particular operation; it is a generic
-     indication that the server knows nothing to do for that call.
+     functions don't make sense for all types of sockets, and others may
+     not be implemented for all communications protocols.  On GNU/Hurd
+     systems, this error can happen for many calls when the object does
+     not support the particular operation; it is a generic indication
+     that the server knows nothing to do for that call.
 
  -- Macro: int EPFNOSUPPORT
      The socket communications protocol family you requested is not
@@ -4902,7 +4891,7 @@
 
  -- Macro: int ENOBUFS
      The kernel's buffers for I/O operations are all in use.  In GNU,
-     this error is always synonymous with `ENOMEM'; you may get one or
+     this error is always synonymous with 'ENOMEM'; you may get one or
      the other from network operations.
 
  -- Macro: int EISCONN
@@ -4913,13 +4902,13 @@
      The socket is not connected to anything.  You get this error when
      you try to transmit data over a socket, without first specifying a
      destination for the data.  For a connectionless socket (for
-     datagram protocols, such as UDP), you get `EDESTADDRREQ' instead.
+     datagram protocols, such as UDP), you get 'EDESTADDRREQ' instead.
 
  -- Macro: int EDESTADDRREQ
      No default destination address was set for the socket.  You get
      this error when you try to transmit data over a connectionless
      socket, without first specifying a destination for the data with
-     `connect'.
+     'connect'.
 
  -- Macro: int ESHUTDOWN
      The socket has already been shut down.
@@ -4940,8 +4929,8 @@
      file name.  This often indicates a cycle of symbolic links.
 
  -- Macro: int ENAMETOOLONG
-     Filename too long (longer than `PATH_MAX'; *note Limits for
-     Files::) or host name too long (in `gethostname' or `sethostname';
+     Filename too long (longer than 'PATH_MAX'; *note Limits for
+     Files::) or host name too long (in 'gethostname' or 'sethostname';
      *note Host Identification::).
 
  -- Macro: int EHOSTDOWN
@@ -4957,9 +4946,9 @@
      directory.
 
  -- Macro: int EPROCLIM
-     This means that the per-user limit on new process would be
-     exceeded by an attempted `fork'.  *Note Limits on Resources::, for
-     details on the `RLIMIT_NPROC' limit.
+     This means that the per-user limit on new process would be exceeded
+     by an attempted 'fork'.  *Note Limits on Resources::, for details
+     on the 'RLIMIT_NPROC' limit.
 
  -- Macro: int EUSERS
      The file quota system is confused because there are too many users.
@@ -4976,9 +4965,9 @@
 
  -- Macro: int EREMOTE
      An attempt was made to NFS-mount a remote file system with a file
-     name that already specifies an NFS-mounted file.  (This is an
-     error on some operating systems, but we expect it to work properly
-     on GNU/Hurd systems, making this error code impossible.)
+     name that already specifies an NFS-mounted file.  (This is an error
+     on some operating systems, but we expect it to work properly on
+     GNU/Hurd systems, making this error code impossible.)
 
  -- Macro: int EBADRPC
      ???
@@ -5002,10 +4991,10 @@
      running another operating system.
 
  -- Macro: int EFTYPE
-     Inappropriate file type or format.  The file was the wrong type
-     for the operation, or a data file had the wrong format.
+     Inappropriate file type or format.  The file was the wrong type for
+     the operation, or a data file had the wrong format.
 
-     On some systems `chmod' returns this error if you try to set the
+     On some systems 'chmod' returns this error if you try to set the
      sticky bit on a non-directory file; *note Setting Permissions::.
 
  -- Macro: int EAUTH
@@ -5018,7 +5007,7 @@
      Function not implemented.  This indicates that the function called
      is not implemented at all, either in the C library itself or in the
      operating system.  When you get this error, you can be sure that
-     this particular function will always fail with `ENOSYS' unless you
+     this particular function will always fail with 'ENOSYS' unless you
      install a new version of the C library or the operating system.
 
  -- Macro: int ENOTSUP
@@ -5026,14 +5015,14 @@
      parameter values are valid, but the functionality they request is
      not available.  This can mean that the function does not implement
      a particular command or option value or flag bit at all.  For
-     functions that operate on some object given in a parameter, such
-     as a file descriptor or a port, it might instead mean that only
-     _that specific object_ (file descriptor, port, etc.) is unable to
+     functions that operate on some object given in a parameter, such as
+     a file descriptor or a port, it might instead mean that only _that
+     specific object_ (file descriptor, port, etc.)  is unable to
      support the other parameters given; different file descriptors
      might support different ranges of parameter values.
 
      If the entire function is not available at all in the
-     implementation, it returns `ENOSYS' instead.
+     implementation, it returns 'ENOSYS' instead.
 
  -- Macro: int EILSEQ
      While decoding a multibyte character the function came along an
@@ -5041,12 +5030,12 @@
      character is invalid.
 
  -- Macro: int EBACKGROUND
-     On GNU/Hurd systems, servers supporting the `term' protocol return
+     On GNU/Hurd systems, servers supporting the 'term' protocol return
      this error for certain operations when the caller is not in the
-     foreground process group of the terminal.  Users do not usually
-     see this error because functions such as `read' and `write'
-     translate it into a `SIGTTIN' or `SIGTTOU' signal.  *Note Job
-     Control::, for information on process groups and these signals.
+     foreground process group of the terminal.  Users do not usually see
+     this error because functions such as 'read' and 'write' translate
+     it into a 'SIGTTIN' or 'SIGTTOU' signal.  *Note Job Control::, for
+     information on process groups and these signals.
 
  -- Macro: int EDIED
      On GNU/Hurd systems, opening a file returns this error when the
@@ -5090,7 +5079,7 @@
  -- Macro: int ECANCELED
      Operation canceled; an asynchronous operation was canceled before
      it completed.  *Note Asynchronous I/O::.  When you call
-     `aio_cancel', the normal result is for the operations affected to
+     'aio_cancel', the normal result is for the operations affected to
      complete with this error; *note Cancel AIO Operations::.
 
    _The following error codes are defined by the Linux/i386 kernel.
@@ -5198,117 +5187,117 @@
 
 The library has functions and variables designed to make it easy for
 your program to report informative error messages in the customary
-format about the failure of a library call.  The functions `strerror'
-and `perror' give you the standard error message for a given error
-code; the variable `program_invocation_short_name' gives you convenient
-access to the name of the program that encountered the error.
+format about the failure of a library call.  The functions 'strerror'
+and 'perror' give you the standard error message for a given error code;
+the variable 'program_invocation_short_name' gives you convenient access
+to the name of the program that encountered the error.
 
  -- Function: char * strerror (int ERRNUM)
      Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe race:strerror | AS-Unsafe heap i18n |
      AC-Unsafe mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `strerror' function maps the error code (*note Checking for
+     The 'strerror' function maps the error code (*note Checking for
      Errors::) specified by the ERRNUM argument to a descriptive error
      message string.  The return value is a pointer to this string.
 
-     The value ERRNUM normally comes from the variable `errno'.
+     The value ERRNUM normally comes from the variable 'errno'.
 
-     You should not modify the string returned by `strerror'.  Also, if
-     you make subsequent calls to `strerror', the string might be
+     You should not modify the string returned by 'strerror'.  Also, if
+     you make subsequent calls to 'strerror', the string might be
      overwritten.  (But it's guaranteed that no library function ever
-     calls `strerror' behind your back.)
+     calls 'strerror' behind your back.)
 
-     The function `strerror' is declared in `string.h'.
+     The function 'strerror' is declared in 'string.h'.
 
  -- Function: char * strerror_r (int ERRNUM, char *BUF, size_t N)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe i18n | AC-Unsafe | *Note POSIX
      Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `strerror_r' function works like `strerror' but instead of
-     returning the error message in a statically allocated buffer
-     shared by all threads in the process, it returns a private copy
-     for the thread. This might be either some permanent global data or
-     a message string in the user supplied buffer starting at BUF with
-     the length of N bytes.
+     The 'strerror_r' function works like 'strerror' but instead of
+     returning the error message in a statically allocated buffer shared
+     by all threads in the process, it returns a private copy for the
+     thread.  This might be either some permanent global data or a
+     message string in the user supplied buffer starting at BUF with the
+     length of N bytes.
 
      At most N characters are written (including the NUL byte) so it is
      up to the user to select the buffer large enough.
 
      This function should always be used in multi-threaded programs
      since there is no way to guarantee the string returned by
-     `strerror' really belongs to the last call of the current thread.
+     'strerror' really belongs to the last call of the current thread.
 
-     This function `strerror_r' is a GNU extension and it is declared in
-     `string.h'.
+     This function 'strerror_r' is a GNU extension and it is declared in
+     'string.h'.
 
  -- Function: void perror (const char *MESSAGE)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:stderr | AS-Unsafe corrupt i18n heap
      lock | AC-Unsafe corrupt lock mem fd | *Note POSIX Safety
      Concepts::.
 
-     This function prints an error message to the stream `stderr'; see
-     *note Standard Streams::.  The orientation of `stderr' is not
+     This function prints an error message to the stream 'stderr'; see
+     *note Standard Streams::.  The orientation of 'stderr' is not
      changed.
 
-     If you call `perror' with a MESSAGE that is either a null pointer
-     or an empty string, `perror' just prints the error message
-     corresponding to `errno', adding a trailing newline.
+     If you call 'perror' with a MESSAGE that is either a null pointer
+     or an empty string, 'perror' just prints the error message
+     corresponding to 'errno', adding a trailing newline.
 
-     If you supply a non-null MESSAGE argument, then `perror' prefixes
-     its output with this string.  It adds a colon and a space
-     character to separate the MESSAGE from the error string
-     corresponding to `errno'.
+     If you supply a non-null MESSAGE argument, then 'perror' prefixes
+     its output with this string.  It adds a colon and a space character
+     to separate the MESSAGE from the error string corresponding to
+     'errno'.
 
-     The function `perror' is declared in `stdio.h'.
+     The function 'perror' is declared in 'stdio.h'.
 
-   `strerror' and `perror' produce the exact same message for any given
-error code; the precise text varies from system to system.  With the
-GNU C Library, the messages are fairly short; there are no multi-line
+   'strerror' and 'perror' produce the exact same message for any given
+error code; the precise text varies from system to system.  With the GNU
+C Library, the messages are fairly short; there are no multi-line
 messages or embedded newlines.  Each error message begins with a capital
 letter and does not include any terminating punctuation.
 
-   *Compatibility Note:* The `strerror' function was introduced in
+   *Compatibility Note:* The 'strerror' function was introduced in
 ISO C89.  Many older C systems do not support this function yet.
 
    Many programs that don't read input from the terminal are designed to
 exit if any system call fails.  By convention, the error message from
 such a program should start with the program's name, sans directories.
-You can find that name in the variable `program_invocation_short_name';
-the full file name is stored the variable `program_invocation_name'.
+You can find that name in the variable 'program_invocation_short_name';
+the full file name is stored the variable 'program_invocation_name'.
 
  -- Variable: char * program_invocation_name
      This variable's value is the name that was used to invoke the
      program running in the current process.  It is the same as
-     `argv[0]'.  Note that this is not necessarily a useful file name;
+     'argv[0]'.  Note that this is not necessarily a useful file name;
      often it contains no directory names.  *Note Program Arguments::.
 
  -- Variable: char * program_invocation_short_name
      This variable's value is the name that was used to invoke the
      program running in the current process, with directory names
      removed.  (That is to say, it is the same as
-     `program_invocation_name' minus everything up to the last slash,
-     if any.)
+     'program_invocation_name' minus everything up to the last slash, if
+     any.)
 
    The library initialization code sets up both of these variables
-before calling `main'.
+before calling 'main'.
 
    *Portability Note:* These two variables are GNU extensions.  If you
 want your program to work with non-GNU libraries, you must save the
-value of `argv[0]' in `main', and then strip off the directory names
+value of 'argv[0]' in 'main', and then strip off the directory names
 yourself.  We added these extensions to make it possible to write
 self-contained error-reporting subroutines that require no explicit
-cooperation from `main'.
+cooperation from 'main'.
 
    Here is an example showing how to handle failure to open a file
-correctly.  The function `open_sesame' tries to open the named file for
-reading and returns a stream if successful.  The `fopen' library
+correctly.  The function 'open_sesame' tries to open the named file for
+reading and returns a stream if successful.  The 'fopen' library
 function returns a null pointer if it couldn't open the file for some
-reason.  In that situation, `open_sesame' constructs an appropriate
-error message using the `strerror' function, and terminates the
-program.  If we were going to make some other library calls before
-passing the error code to `strerror', we'd have to save it in a local
-variable instead, because those other library functions might overwrite
-`errno' in the meantime.
+reason.  In that situation, 'open_sesame' constructs an appropriate
+error message using the 'strerror' function, and terminates the program.
+If we were going to make some other library calls before passing the
+error code to 'strerror', we'd have to save it in a local variable
+instead, because those other library functions might overwrite 'errno'
+in the meantime.
 
      #include <errno.h>
      #include <stdio.h>
@@ -5332,53 +5321,53 @@
          return stream;
      }
 
-   Using `perror' has the advantage that the function is portable and
-available on all systems implementing ISO C.  But often the text
-`perror' generates is not what is wanted and there is no way to extend
-or change what `perror' does.  The GNU coding standard, for instance,
-requires error messages to be preceded by the program name and programs
-which read some input files should provide information about the input
-file name and the line number in case an error is encountered while
-reading the file.  For these occasions there are two functions
-available which are widely used throughout the GNU project.  These
-functions are declared in `error.h'.
+   Using 'perror' has the advantage that the function is portable and
+available on all systems implementing ISO C. But often the text 'perror'
+generates is not what is wanted and there is no way to extend or change
+what 'perror' does.  The GNU coding standard, for instance, requires
+error messages to be preceded by the program name and programs which
+read some input files should provide information about the input file
+name and the line number in case an error is encountered while reading
+the file.  For these occasions there are two functions available which
+are widely used throughout the GNU project.  These functions are
+declared in 'error.h'.
 
  -- Function: void error (int STATUS, int ERRNUM, const char *FORMAT,
           ...)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap i18n |
      AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `error' function can be used to report general problems during
+     The 'error' function can be used to report general problems during
      program execution.  The FORMAT argument is a format string just
-     like those given to the `printf' family of functions.  The
+     like those given to the 'printf' family of functions.  The
      arguments required for the format can follow the FORMAT parameter.
-     Just like `perror', `error' also can report an error code in
-     textual form.  But unlike `perror' the error value is explicitly
+     Just like 'perror', 'error' also can report an error code in
+     textual form.  But unlike 'perror' the error value is explicitly
      passed to the function in the ERRNUM parameter.  This eliminates
      the problem mentioned above that the error reporting function must
      be called immediately after the function causing the error since
-     otherwise `errno' might have a different value.
+     otherwise 'errno' might have a different value.
 
-     The `error' prints first the program name.  If the application
-     defined a global variable `error_print_progname' and points it to a
+     The 'error' prints first the program name.  If the application
+     defined a global variable 'error_print_progname' and points it to a
      function this function will be called to print the program name.
-     Otherwise the string from the global variable `program_name' is
-     used.  The program name is followed by a colon and a space which
-     in turn is followed by the output produced by the format string.
-     If the ERRNUM parameter is non-zero the format string output is
+     Otherwise the string from the global variable 'program_name' is
+     used.  The program name is followed by a colon and a space which in
+     turn is followed by the output produced by the format string.  If
+     the ERRNUM parameter is non-zero the format string output is
      followed by a colon and a space, followed by the error message for
-     the error code ERRNUM.  In any case is the output terminated with
-     a newline.
+     the error code ERRNUM.  In any case is the output terminated with a
+     newline.
 
-     The output is directed to the `stderr' stream.  If the `stderr'
+     The output is directed to the 'stderr' stream.  If the 'stderr'
      wasn't oriented before the call it will be narrow-oriented
      afterwards.
 
-     The function will return unless the STATUS parameter has a
-     non-zero value.  In this case the function will call `exit' with
-     the STATUS value for its parameter and therefore never return.  If
-     `error' returns the global variable `error_message_count' is
-     incremented by one to keep track of the number of errors reported.
+     The function will return unless the STATUS parameter has a non-zero
+     value.  In this case the function will call 'exit' with the STATUS
+     value for its parameter and therefore never return.  If 'error'
+     returns the global variable 'error_message_count' is incremented by
+     one to keep track of the number of errors reported.
 
  -- Function: void error_at_line (int STATUS, int ERRNUM, const char
           *FNAME, unsigned int LINENO, const char *FORMAT, ...)
@@ -5386,10 +5375,10 @@
      locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap i18n | AC-Unsafe
      corrupt/error_one_per_line | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `error_at_line' function is very similar to the `error'
+     The 'error_at_line' function is very similar to the 'error'
      function.  The only difference are the additional parameters FNAME
      and LINENO.  The handling of the other parameters is identical to
-     that of `error' except that between the program name and the string
+     that of 'error' except that between the program name and the string
      generated by the format string additional text is inserted.
 
      Directly following the program name a colon, followed by the file
@@ -5400,40 +5389,40 @@
      error in an input file (like a programming language source code
      file etc).
 
-     If the global variable `error_one_per_line' is set to a non-zero
-     value `error_at_line' will avoid printing consecutive messages for
+     If the global variable 'error_one_per_line' is set to a non-zero
+     value 'error_at_line' will avoid printing consecutive messages for
      the same file and line.  Repetition which are not directly
      following each other are not caught.
 
-     Just like `error' this function only returned if STATUS is zero.
-     Otherwise `exit' is called with the non-zero value.  If `error'
-     returns the global variable `error_message_count' is incremented
-     by one to keep track of the number of errors reported.
+     Just like 'error' this function only returned if STATUS is zero.
+     Otherwise 'exit' is called with the non-zero value.  If 'error'
+     returns the global variable 'error_message_count' is incremented by
+     one to keep track of the number of errors reported.
 
-   As mentioned above the `error' and `error_at_line' functions can be
-customized by defining a variable named `error_print_progname'.
+   As mentioned above the 'error' and 'error_at_line' functions can be
+customized by defining a variable named 'error_print_progname'.
 
  -- Variable: void (*error_print_progname) (void)
-     If the `error_print_progname' variable is defined to a non-zero
-     value the function pointed to is called by `error' or
-     `error_at_line'.  It is expected to print the program name or do
+     If the 'error_print_progname' variable is defined to a non-zero
+     value the function pointed to is called by 'error' or
+     'error_at_line'.  It is expected to print the program name or do
      something similarly useful.
 
-     The function is expected to be print to the `stderr' stream and
+     The function is expected to be print to the 'stderr' stream and
      must be able to handle whatever orientation the stream has.
 
      The variable is global and shared by all threads.
 
  -- Variable: unsigned int error_message_count
-     The `error_message_count' variable is incremented whenever one of
-     the functions `error' or `error_at_line' returns.  The variable is
+     The 'error_message_count' variable is incremented whenever one of
+     the functions 'error' or 'error_at_line' returns.  The variable is
      global and shared by all threads.
 
  -- Variable: int error_one_per_line
-     The `error_one_per_line' variable influences only `error_at_line'.
-     Normally the `error_at_line' function creates output for every
-     invocation.  If `error_one_per_line' is set to a non-zero value
-     `error_at_line' keeps track of the last file name and line number
+     The 'error_one_per_line' variable influences only 'error_at_line'.
+     Normally the 'error_at_line' function creates output for every
+     invocation.  If 'error_one_per_line' is set to a non-zero value
+     'error_at_line' keeps track of the last file name and line number
      for which an error was reported and avoid directly following
      messages for the same file and line.  This variable is global and
      shared by all threads.
@@ -5467,82 +5456,82 @@
          error (EXIT_FAILURE, 0, "%u errors found", error_message_count);
      }
 
-   `error' and `error_at_line' are clearly the functions of choice and
+   'error' and 'error_at_line' are clearly the functions of choice and
 enable the programmer to write applications which follow the GNU coding
 standard.  The GNU C Library additionally contains functions which are
 used in BSD for the same purpose.  These functions are declared in
-`err.h'.  It is generally advised to not use these functions.  They are
+'err.h'.  It is generally advised to not use these functions.  They are
 included only for compatibility.
 
  -- Function: void warn (const char *FORMAT, ...)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap i18n |
      AC-Unsafe corrupt lock mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `warn' function is roughly equivalent to a call like
+     The 'warn' function is roughly equivalent to a call like
             error (0, errno, format, the parameters)
-     except that the global variables `error' respects and modifies are
+     except that the global variables 'error' respects and modifies are
      not used.
 
  -- Function: void vwarn (const char *FORMAT, va_list AP)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap i18n |
      AC-Unsafe corrupt lock mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `vwarn' function is just like `warn' except that the
-     parameters for the handling of the format string FORMAT are passed
-     in as a value of type `va_list'.
+     The 'vwarn' function is just like 'warn' except that the parameters
+     for the handling of the format string FORMAT are passed in as a
+     value of type 'va_list'.
 
  -- Function: void warnx (const char *FORMAT, ...)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap | AC-Unsafe
      corrupt lock mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `warnx' function is roughly equivalent to a call like
+     The 'warnx' function is roughly equivalent to a call like
             error (0, 0, format, the parameters)
-     except that the global variables `error' respects and modifies are
-     not used.  The difference to `warn' is that no error number string
+     except that the global variables 'error' respects and modifies are
+     not used.  The difference to 'warn' is that no error number string
      is printed.
 
  -- Function: void vwarnx (const char *FORMAT, va_list AP)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap | AC-Unsafe
      corrupt lock mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `vwarnx' function is just like `warnx' except that the
+     The 'vwarnx' function is just like 'warnx' except that the
      parameters for the handling of the format string FORMAT are passed
-     in as a value of type `va_list'.
+     in as a value of type 'va_list'.
 
  -- Function: void err (int STATUS, const char *FORMAT, ...)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap i18n |
      AC-Unsafe corrupt lock mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `err' function is roughly equivalent to a call like
+     The 'err' function is roughly equivalent to a call like
             error (status, errno, format, the parameters)
-     except that the global variables `error' respects and modifies are
+     except that the global variables 'error' respects and modifies are
      not used and that the program is exited even if STATUS is zero.
 
  -- Function: void verr (int STATUS, const char *FORMAT, va_list AP)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap i18n |
      AC-Unsafe corrupt lock mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `verr' function is just like `err' except that the parameters
+     The 'verr' function is just like 'err' except that the parameters
      for the handling of the format string FORMAT are passed in as a
-     value of type `va_list'.
+     value of type 'va_list'.
 
  -- Function: void errx (int STATUS, const char *FORMAT, ...)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap | AC-Unsafe
      corrupt lock mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `errx' function is roughly equivalent to a call like
+     The 'errx' function is roughly equivalent to a call like
             error (status, 0, format, the parameters)
-     except that the global variables `error' respects and modifies are
+     except that the global variables 'error' respects and modifies are
      not used and that the program is exited even if STATUS is zero.
-     The difference to `err' is that no error number string is printed.
+     The difference to 'err' is that no error number string is printed.
 
  -- Function: void verrx (int STATUS, const char *FORMAT, va_list AP)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Unsafe corrupt heap | AC-Unsafe
      corrupt lock mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `verrx' function is just like `errx' except that the
-     parameters for the handling of the format string FORMAT are passed
-     in as a value of type `va_list'.
+     The 'verrx' function is just like 'errx' except that the parameters
+     for the handling of the format string FORMAT are passed in as a
+     value of type 'va_list'.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Memory,  Next: Character Handling,  Prev: Error Reporting,  Up: Top
@@ -5562,7 +5551,7 @@
 
 * Memory Concepts::             An introduction to concepts and terminology.
 * Memory Allocation::           Allocating storage for your program data
-* Resizing the Data Segment::   `brk', `sbrk'
+* Resizing the Data Segment::   'brk', 'sbrk'
 * Locking Pages::               Preventing page faults
 
    Memory mapped I/O is not discussed in this chapter.  *Note
@@ -5586,14 +5575,14 @@
 "frame") or some secondary storage, usually disk space.  The disk space
 might be swap space or just some ordinary disk file.  Actually, a page
 of all zeroes sometimes has nothing at all backing it - there's just a
-flag saying it is all zeroes.  
+flag saying it is all zeroes.
 
    The same frame of real memory or backing store can back multiple
 virtual pages belonging to multiple processes.  This is normally the
 case, for example, with virtual memory occupied by GNU C Library code.
-The same real memory frame containing the `printf' function backs a
+The same real memory frame containing the 'printf' function backs a
 virtual memory page in each of the existing processes that has a
-`printf' call in its program.
+'printf' call in its program.
 
    In order for a program to access any part of a virtual page, the page
 must at that moment be backed by ("connected to") a real frame.  But
@@ -5613,7 +5602,7 @@
 time of an instruction that would normally be a few nanoseconds is
 suddenly much, much, longer (because the kernel normally has to do I/O
 to complete the page-in).  For programs sensitive to that, the functions
-described in *note Locking Pages:: can control it.  
+described in *note Locking Pages:: can control it.
 
    Within each virtual address space, a process has to keep track of
 what is at which addresses, and that process is called memory
@@ -5629,13 +5618,13 @@
 
    Exec is the operation of creating a virtual address space for a
 process, loading its basic program into it, and executing the program.
-It is done by the "exec" family of functions (e.g. `execl').  The
+It is done by the "exec" family of functions (e.g.  'execl').  The
 operation takes a program file (an executable), it allocates space to
 load all the data in the executable, loads it, and transfers control to
 it.  That data is most notably the instructions of the program (the
 "text"), but also literals and constants in the program and even some
 variables: C variables with the static storage class (*note Memory
-Allocation and C::).  
+Allocation and C::).
 
    Once that program begins to execute, it uses programmatic allocation
 to gain additional memory.  In a C program with the GNU C Library, there
@@ -5646,25 +5635,26 @@
 allocation.  Mapping memory to a file means declaring that the contents
 of certain range of a process' addresses shall be identical to the
 contents of a specified regular file.  The system makes the virtual
-memory initially contain the contents of the file, and if you modify
-the memory, the system writes the same modification to the file.  Note
-that due to the magic of virtual memory and page faults, there is no
-reason for the system to do I/O to read the file, or allocate real
-memory for its contents, until the program accesses the virtual memory.
-*Note Memory-mapped I/O::.  
+memory initially contain the contents of the file, and if you modify the
+memory, the system writes the same modification to the file.  Note that
+due to the magic of virtual memory and page faults, there is no reason
+for the system to do I/O to read the file, or allocate real memory for
+its contents, until the program accesses the virtual memory.  *Note
+Memory-mapped I/O::.
 
    Just as it programmatically allocates memory, the program can
-programmatically deallocate ("free") it.  You can't free the memory
-that was allocated by exec.  When the program exits or execs, you might
-say that all its memory gets freed, but since in both cases the address
+programmatically deallocate ("free") it.  You can't free the memory that
+was allocated by exec.  When the program exits or execs, you might say
+that all its memory gets freed, but since in both cases the address
 space ceases to exist, the point is really moot.  *Note Program
-Termination::.  
+Termination::.
 
-   A process' virtual address space is divided into segments.  A
-segment is a contiguous range of virtual addresses.  Three important
-segments are:
+   A process' virtual address space is divided into segments.  A segment
+is a contiguous range of virtual addresses.  Three important segments
+are:
 
-   *  The "text segment" contains a program's instructions and literals
+   * 
+     The "text segment" contains a program's instructions and literals
      and static constants.  It is allocated by exec and stays the same
      size for the life of the virtual address space.
 
@@ -5676,7 +5666,6 @@
    * The "stack segment" contains a program stack.  It grows as the
      stack grows, but doesn't shrink when the stack shrinks.
 
-
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Memory Allocation,  Next: Resizing the Data Segment,  Prev: Memory Concepts,  Up: Memory
 
@@ -5684,13 +5673,13 @@
 =======================================
 
 This section covers how ordinary programs manage storage for their data,
-including the famous `malloc' function and some fancier facilities
+including the famous 'malloc' function and some fancier facilities
 special the GNU C Library and GNU Compiler.
 
 * Menu:
 
 * Memory Allocation and C::     How to get different kinds of allocation in C.
-* Unconstrained Allocation::    The `malloc' facility allows fully general
+* Unconstrained Allocation::    The 'malloc' facility allows fully general
 		 		 dynamic allocation.
 * Allocation Debugging::        Finding memory leaks and not freed memory.
 * Obstacks::                    Obstacks are less general than malloc
@@ -5712,20 +5701,20 @@
      global variable.  Each static or global variable defines one block
      of space, of a fixed size.  The space is allocated once, when your
      program is started (part of the exec operation), and is never
-     freed.  
+     freed.
 
    * "Automatic allocation" happens when you declare an automatic
      variable, such as a function argument or a local variable.  The
      space for an automatic variable is allocated when the compound
      statement containing the declaration is entered, and is freed when
-     that compound statement is exited.  
+     that compound statement is exited.
 
      In GNU C, the size of the automatic storage can be an expression
      that varies.  In other C implementations, it must be a constant.
 
-   A third important kind of memory allocation, "dynamic allocation",
-is not supported by C variables but is available via GNU C Library
-functions.  
+   A third important kind of memory allocation, "dynamic allocation", is
+not supported by C variables but is available via GNU C Library
+functions.
 
 3.2.1.1 Dynamic Memory Allocation
 .................................
@@ -5753,8 +5742,8 @@
 as you want.
 
    Dynamic allocation is not supported by C variables; there is no
-storage class "dynamic", and there can never be a C variable whose
-value is stored in dynamically allocated space.  The only way to get
+storage class "dynamic", and there can never be a C variable whose value
+is stored in dynamically allocated space.  The only way to get
 dynamically allocated memory is via a system call (which is generally
 via a GNU C Library function call), and the only way to refer to
 dynamically allocated space is through a pointer.  Because it is less
@@ -5763,11 +5752,11 @@
 allocation only when neither static nor automatic allocation will serve.
 
    For example, if you want to allocate dynamically some space to hold a
-`struct foobar', you cannot declare a variable of type `struct foobar'
-whose contents are the dynamically allocated space.  But you can
-declare a variable of pointer type `struct foobar *' and assign it the
-address of the space.  Then you can use the operators `*' and `->' on
-this pointer variable to refer to the contents of the space:
+'struct foobar', you cannot declare a variable of type 'struct foobar'
+whose contents are the dynamically allocated space.  But you can declare
+a variable of pointer type 'struct foobar *' and assign it the address
+of the space.  Then you can use the operators '*' and '->' on this
+pointer variable to refer to the contents of the space:
 
      {
        struct foobar *ptr
@@ -5783,32 +5772,32 @@
 3.2.2 Unconstrained Allocation
 ------------------------------
 
-The most general dynamic allocation facility is `malloc'.  It allows
-you to allocate blocks of memory of any size at any time, make them
-bigger or smaller at any time, and free the blocks individually at any
-time (or never).
+The most general dynamic allocation facility is 'malloc'.  It allows you
+to allocate blocks of memory of any size at any time, make them bigger
+or smaller at any time, and free the blocks individually at any time (or
+never).
 
 * Menu:
 
-* Basic Allocation::            Simple use of `malloc'.
-* Malloc Examples::             Examples of `malloc'.  `xmalloc'.
-* Freeing after Malloc::        Use `free' to free a block you
-				 got with `malloc'.
-* Changing Block Size::         Use `realloc' to make a block
+* Basic Allocation::            Simple use of 'malloc'.
+* Malloc Examples::             Examples of 'malloc'.  'xmalloc'.
+* Freeing after Malloc::        Use 'free' to free a block you
+				 got with 'malloc'.
+* Changing Block Size::         Use 'realloc' to make a block
 				 bigger or smaller.
-* Allocating Cleared Space::    Use `calloc' to allocate a
+* Allocating Cleared Space::    Use 'calloc' to allocate a
 				 block and clear it.
 * Efficiency and Malloc::       Efficiency considerations in use of
 				 these functions.
 * Aligned Memory Blocks::       Allocating specially aligned memory.
-* Malloc Tunable Parameters::   Use `mallopt' to adjust allocation
+* Malloc Tunable Parameters::   Use 'mallopt' to adjust allocation
                                  parameters.
 * Heap Consistency Checking::   Automatic checking for errors.
 * Hooks for Malloc::            You can use these hooks for debugging
-				 programs that use `malloc'.
+				 programs that use 'malloc'.
 * Statistics of Malloc::        Getting information about how much
 				 memory your program is using.
-* Summary of Malloc::           Summary of `malloc' and related functions.
+* Summary of Malloc::           Summary of 'malloc' and related functions.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Basic Allocation,  Next: Malloc Examples,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
@@ -5816,8 +5805,8 @@
 3.2.2.1 Basic Memory Allocation
 ...............................
 
-To allocate a block of memory, call `malloc'.  The prototype for this
-function is in `stdlib.h'.  
+To allocate a block of memory, call 'malloc'.  The prototype for this
+function is in 'stdlib.h'.
 
  -- Function: void * malloc (size_t SIZE)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe lock | AC-Unsafe lock fd mem |
@@ -5827,11 +5816,11 @@
      bytes long, or a null pointer if the block could not be allocated.
 
    The contents of the block are undefined; you must initialize it
-yourself (or use `calloc' instead; *note Allocating Cleared Space::).
+yourself (or use 'calloc' instead; *note Allocating Cleared Space::).
 Normally you would cast the value as a pointer to the kind of object
 that you want to store in the block.  Here we show an example of doing
 so, and of initializing the space with zeros using the library function
-`memset' (*note Copying and Concatenation::):
+'memset' (*note Copying and Concatenation::):
 
      struct foo *ptr;
      ...
@@ -5839,14 +5828,14 @@
      if (ptr == 0) abort ();
      memset (ptr, 0, sizeof (struct foo));
 
-   You can store the result of `malloc' into any pointer variable
-without a cast, because ISO C automatically converts the type `void *'
-to another type of pointer when necessary.  But the cast is necessary
-in contexts other than assignment operators or if you might want your
-code to run in traditional C.
+   You can store the result of 'malloc' into any pointer variable
+without a cast, because ISO C automatically converts the type 'void *'
+to another type of pointer when necessary.  But the cast is necessary in
+contexts other than assignment operators or if you might want your code
+to run in traditional C.
 
    Remember that when allocating space for a string, the argument to
-`malloc' must be one plus the length of the string.  This is because a
+'malloc' must be one plus the length of the string.  This is because a
 string is terminated with a null character that doesn't count in the
 "length" of the string but does need space.  For example:
 
@@ -5859,14 +5848,14 @@
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Malloc Examples,  Next: Freeing after Malloc,  Prev: Basic Allocation,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
 
-3.2.2.2 Examples of `malloc'
+3.2.2.2 Examples of 'malloc'
 ............................
 
-If no more space is available, `malloc' returns a null pointer.  You
-should check the value of _every_ call to `malloc'.  It is useful to
-write a subroutine that calls `malloc' and reports an error if the
-value is a null pointer, returning only if the value is nonzero.  This
-function is conventionally called `xmalloc'.  Here it is:
+If no more space is available, 'malloc' returns a null pointer.  You
+should check the value of _every_ call to 'malloc'.  It is useful to
+write a subroutine that calls 'malloc' and reports an error if the value
+is a null pointer, returning only if the value is nonzero.  This
+function is conventionally called 'xmalloc'.  Here it is:
 
      void *
      xmalloc (size_t size)
@@ -5877,8 +5866,8 @@
        return value;
      }
 
-   Here is a real example of using `malloc' (by way of `xmalloc').  The
-function `savestring' will copy a sequence of characters into a newly
+   Here is a real example of using 'malloc' (by way of 'xmalloc').  The
+function 'savestring' will copy a sequence of characters into a newly
 allocated null-terminated string:
 
      char *
@@ -5889,51 +5878,51 @@
        return (char *) memcpy (value, ptr, len);
      }
 
-   The block that `malloc' gives you is guaranteed to be aligned so
-that it can hold any type of data.  On GNU systems, the address is
-always a multiple of eight on 32-bit systems, and a multiple of 16 on
-64-bit systems.  Only rarely is any higher boundary (such as a page
-boundary) necessary; for those cases, use `aligned_alloc' or
-`posix_memalign' (*note Aligned Memory Blocks::).
+   The block that 'malloc' gives you is guaranteed to be aligned so that
+it can hold any type of data.  On GNU systems, the address is always a
+multiple of eight on 32-bit systems, and a multiple of 16 on 64-bit
+systems.  Only rarely is any higher boundary (such as a page boundary)
+necessary; for those cases, use 'aligned_alloc' or 'posix_memalign'
+(*note Aligned Memory Blocks::).
 
    Note that the memory located after the end of the block is likely to
 be in use for something else; perhaps a block already allocated by
-another call to `malloc'.  If you attempt to treat the block as longer
+another call to 'malloc'.  If you attempt to treat the block as longer
 than you asked for it to be, you are liable to destroy the data that
-`malloc' uses to keep track of its blocks, or you may destroy the
+'malloc' uses to keep track of its blocks, or you may destroy the
 contents of another block.  If you have already allocated a block and
-discover you want it to be bigger, use `realloc' (*note Changing Block
+discover you want it to be bigger, use 'realloc' (*note Changing Block
 Size::).
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Freeing after Malloc,  Next: Changing Block Size,  Prev: Malloc Examples,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
 
-3.2.2.3 Freeing Memory Allocated with `malloc'
+3.2.2.3 Freeing Memory Allocated with 'malloc'
 ..............................................
 
-When you no longer need a block that you got with `malloc', use the
-function `free' to make the block available to be allocated again.  The
-prototype for this function is in `stdlib.h'.  
+When you no longer need a block that you got with 'malloc', use the
+function 'free' to make the block available to be allocated again.  The
+prototype for this function is in 'stdlib.h'.
 
  -- Function: void free (void *PTR)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe lock | AC-Unsafe lock fd mem |
      *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `free' function deallocates the block of memory pointed at by
+     The 'free' function deallocates the block of memory pointed at by
      PTR.
 
  -- Function: void cfree (void *PTR)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe lock | AC-Unsafe lock fd mem |
      *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     This function does the same thing as `free'.  It's provided for
-     backward compatibility with SunOS; you should use `free' instead.
+     This function does the same thing as 'free'.  It's provided for
+     backward compatibility with SunOS; you should use 'free' instead.
 
    Freeing a block alters the contents of the block.  *Do not expect to
-find any data (such as a pointer to the next block in a chain of
-blocks) in the block after freeing it.*  Copy whatever you need out of
-the block before freeing it!  Here is an example of the proper way to
-free all the blocks in a chain, and the strings that they point to:
+find any data (such as a pointer to the next block in a chain of blocks)
+in the block after freeing it.*  Copy whatever you need out of the block
+before freeing it!  Here is an example of the proper way to free all the
+blocks in a chain, and the strings that they point to:
 
      struct chain
        {
@@ -5953,11 +5942,11 @@
          }
      }
 
-   Occasionally, `free' can actually return memory to the operating
+   Occasionally, 'free' can actually return memory to the operating
 system and make the process smaller.  Usually, all it can do is allow a
-later call to `malloc' to reuse the space.  In the meantime, the space
+later call to 'malloc' to reuse the space.  In the meantime, the space
 remains in your program as part of a free-list used internally by
-`malloc'.
+'malloc'.
 
    There is no point in freeing blocks at the end of a program, because
 all of the program's space is given back to the system when the process
@@ -5975,37 +5964,37 @@
 file; no matter how long you make the buffer initially, you may
 encounter a line that is longer.
 
-   You can make the block longer by calling `realloc'.  This function
-is declared in `stdlib.h'.  
+   You can make the block longer by calling 'realloc'.  This function is
+declared in 'stdlib.h'.
 
  -- Function: void * realloc (void *PTR, size_t NEWSIZE)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe lock | AC-Unsafe lock fd mem |
      *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `realloc' function changes the size of the block whose address
+     The 'realloc' function changes the size of the block whose address
      is PTR to be NEWSIZE.
 
-     Since the space after the end of the block may be in use, `realloc'
-     may find it necessary to copy the block to a new address where
-     more free space is available.  The value of `realloc' is the new
-     address of the block.  If the block needs to be moved, `realloc'
-     copies the old contents.
+     Since the space after the end of the block may be in use, 'realloc'
+     may find it necessary to copy the block to a new address where more
+     free space is available.  The value of 'realloc' is the new address
+     of the block.  If the block needs to be moved, 'realloc' copies the
+     old contents.
 
-     If you pass a null pointer for PTR, `realloc' behaves just like
-     `malloc (NEWSIZE)'.  This can be convenient, but beware that older
+     If you pass a null pointer for PTR, 'realloc' behaves just like
+     'malloc (NEWSIZE)'.  This can be convenient, but beware that older
      implementations (before ISO C) may not support this behavior, and
-     will probably crash when `realloc' is passed a null pointer.
+     will probably crash when 'realloc' is passed a null pointer.
 
-   Like `malloc', `realloc' may return a null pointer if no memory
-space is available to make the block bigger.  When this happens, the
-original block is untouched; it has not been modified or relocated.
+   Like 'malloc', 'realloc' may return a null pointer if no memory space
+is available to make the block bigger.  When this happens, the original
+block is untouched; it has not been modified or relocated.
 
    In most cases it makes no difference what happens to the original
-block when `realloc' fails, because the application program cannot
-continue when it is out of memory, and the only thing to do is to give
-a fatal error message.  Often it is convenient to write and use a
-subroutine, conventionally called `xrealloc', that takes care of the
-error message as `xmalloc' does for `malloc':
+block when 'realloc' fails, because the application program cannot
+continue when it is out of memory, and the only thing to do is to give a
+fatal error message.  Often it is convenient to write and use a
+subroutine, conventionally called 'xrealloc', that takes care of the
+error message as 'xmalloc' does for 'malloc':
 
      void *
      xrealloc (void *ptr, size_t size)
@@ -6016,15 +6005,14 @@
        return value;
      }
 
-   You can also use `realloc' to make a block smaller.  The reason you
+   You can also use 'realloc' to make a block smaller.  The reason you
 would do this is to avoid tying up a lot of memory space when only a
-little is needed.  In several allocation implementations, making a
-block smaller sometimes necessitates copying it, so it can fail if no
-other space is available.
+little is needed.  In several allocation implementations, making a block
+smaller sometimes necessitates copying it, so it can fail if no other
+space is available.
 
-   If the new size you specify is the same as the old size, `realloc'
-is guaranteed to change nothing and return the same address that you
-gave.
+   If the new size you specify is the same as the old size, 'realloc' is
+guaranteed to change nothing and return the same address that you gave.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Allocating Cleared Space,  Next: Efficiency and Malloc,  Prev: Changing Block Size,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
@@ -6032,8 +6020,8 @@
 3.2.2.5 Allocating Cleared Space
 ................................
 
-The function `calloc' allocates memory and clears it to zero.  It is
-declared in `stdlib.h'.  
+The function 'calloc' allocates memory and clears it to zero.  It is
+declared in 'stdlib.h'.
 
  -- Function: void * calloc (size_t COUNT, size_t ELTSIZE)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe lock | AC-Unsafe lock fd mem |
@@ -6041,9 +6029,9 @@
 
      This function allocates a block long enough to contain a vector of
      COUNT elements, each of size ELTSIZE.  Its contents are cleared to
-     zero before `calloc' returns.
+     zero before 'calloc' returns.
 
-   You could define `calloc' as follows:
+   You could define 'calloc' as follows:
 
      void *
      calloc (size_t count, size_t eltsize)
@@ -6055,32 +6043,31 @@
        return value;
      }
 
-   But in general, it is not guaranteed that `calloc' calls `malloc'
+   But in general, it is not guaranteed that 'calloc' calls 'malloc'
 internally.  Therefore, if an application provides its own
-`malloc'/`realloc'/`free' outside the C library, it should always
-define `calloc', too.
+'malloc'/'realloc'/'free' outside the C library, it should always define
+'calloc', too.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Efficiency and Malloc,  Next: Aligned Memory Blocks,  Prev: Allocating Cleared Space,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
 
-3.2.2.6 Efficiency Considerations for `malloc'
+3.2.2.6 Efficiency Considerations for 'malloc'
 ..............................................
 
-As opposed to other versions, the `malloc' in the GNU C Library does
-not round up block sizes to powers of two, neither for large nor for
-small sizes.  Neighboring chunks can be coalesced on a `free' no matter
-what their size is.  This makes the implementation suitable for all
-kinds of allocation patterns without generally incurring high memory
-waste through fragmentation.
+As opposed to other versions, the 'malloc' in the GNU C Library does not
+round up block sizes to powers of two, neither for large nor for small
+sizes.  Neighboring chunks can be coalesced on a 'free' no matter what
+their size is.  This makes the implementation suitable for all kinds of
+allocation patterns without generally incurring high memory waste
+through fragmentation.
 
-   Very large blocks (much larger than a page) are allocated with
-`mmap' (anonymous or via `/dev/zero') by this implementation.  This has
-the great advantage that these chunks are returned to the system
-immediately when they are freed.  Therefore, it cannot happen that a
-large chunk becomes "locked" in between smaller ones and even after
-calling `free' wastes memory.  The size threshold for `mmap' to be used
-can be adjusted with `mallopt'.  The use of `mmap' can also be disabled
-completely.
+   Very large blocks (much larger than a page) are allocated with 'mmap'
+(anonymous or via '/dev/zero') by this implementation.  This has the
+great advantage that these chunks are returned to the system immediately
+when they are freed.  Therefore, it cannot happen that a large chunk
+becomes "locked" in between smaller ones and even after calling 'free'
+wastes memory.  The size threshold for 'mmap' to be used can be adjusted
+with 'mallopt'.  The use of 'mmap' can also be disabled completely.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Aligned Memory Blocks,  Next: Malloc Tunable Parameters,  Prev: Efficiency and Malloc,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
@@ -6088,92 +6075,88 @@
 3.2.2.7 Allocating Aligned Memory Blocks
 ........................................
 
-The address of a block returned by `malloc' or `realloc' in GNU systems
+The address of a block returned by 'malloc' or 'realloc' in GNU systems
 is always a multiple of eight (or sixteen on 64-bit systems).  If you
 need a block whose address is a multiple of a higher power of two than
-that, use `aligned_alloc' or `posix_memalign'.  `aligned_alloc' and
-`posix_memalign' are declared in `stdlib.h'.
+that, use 'aligned_alloc' or 'posix_memalign'.  'aligned_alloc' and
+'posix_memalign' are declared in 'stdlib.h'.
 
  -- Function: void * aligned_alloc (size_t ALIGNMENT, size_t SIZE)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe lock | AC-Unsafe lock fd mem |
      *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `aligned_alloc' function allocates a block of SIZE bytes whose
+     The 'aligned_alloc' function allocates a block of SIZE bytes whose
      address is a multiple of ALIGNMENT.  The ALIGNMENT must be a power
      of two and SIZE must be a multiple of ALIGNMENT.
 
-     The `aligned_alloc' function returns a null pointer on error and
-     sets `errno' to one of the following values:
+     The 'aligned_alloc' function returns a null pointer on error and
+     sets 'errno' to one of the following values:
 
-    `ENOMEM'
+     'ENOMEM'
           There was insufficient memory available to satisfy the
           request.
 
-    `EINVAL'
+     'EINVAL'
           ALIGNMENT is not a power of two.
 
           This function was introduced in ISO C11 and hence may have
           better portability to modern non-POSIX systems than
-          `posix_memalign'.
-
+          'posix_memalign'.
 
  -- Function: void * memalign (size_t BOUNDARY, size_t SIZE)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe lock | AC-Unsafe lock fd mem |
      *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `memalign' function allocates a block of SIZE bytes whose
-     address is a multiple of BOUNDARY.  The BOUNDARY must be a power
-     of two!  The function `memalign' works by allocating a somewhat
-     larger block, and then returning an address within the block that
-     is on the specified boundary.
+     The 'memalign' function allocates a block of SIZE bytes whose
+     address is a multiple of BOUNDARY.  The BOUNDARY must be a power of
+     two!  The function 'memalign' works by allocating a somewhat larger
+     block, and then returning an address within the block that is on
+     the specified boundary.
 
-     The `memalign' function returns a null pointer on error and sets
-     `errno' to one of the following values:
+     The 'memalign' function returns a null pointer on error and sets
+     'errno' to one of the following values:
 
-    `ENOMEM'
+     'ENOMEM'
           There was insufficient memory available to satisfy the
           request.
 
-    `EINVAL'
+     'EINVAL'
           ALIGNMENT is not a power of two.
 
-
-     The `memalign' function is obsolete and `aligned_alloc' or
-     `posix_memalign' should be used instead.
+     The 'memalign' function is obsolete and 'aligned_alloc' or
+     'posix_memalign' should be used instead.
 
  -- Function: int posix_memalign (void **MEMPTR, size_t ALIGNMENT,
           size_t SIZE)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe lock | AC-Unsafe lock fd mem |
      *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `posix_memalign' function is similar to the `memalign'
-     function in that it returns a buffer of SIZE bytes aligned to a
-     multiple of ALIGNMENT.  But it adds one requirement to the
-     parameter ALIGNMENT: the value must be a power of two multiple of
-     `sizeof (void *)'.
+     The 'posix_memalign' function is similar to the 'memalign' function
+     in that it returns a buffer of SIZE bytes aligned to a multiple of
+     ALIGNMENT.  But it adds one requirement to the parameter ALIGNMENT:
+     the value must be a power of two multiple of 'sizeof (void *)'.
 
      If the function succeeds in allocation memory a pointer to the
-     allocated memory is returned in `*MEMPTR' and the return value is
-     zero.  Otherwise the function returns an error value indicating
-     the problem.  The possible error values returned are:
+     allocated memory is returned in '*MEMPTR' and the return value is
+     zero.  Otherwise the function returns an error value indicating the
+     problem.  The possible error values returned are:
 
-    `ENOMEM'
+     'ENOMEM'
           There was insufficient memory available to satisfy the
           request.
 
-    `EINVAL'
-          ALIGNMENT is not a power of two multiple of `sizeof (void *)'.
+     'EINVAL'
+          ALIGNMENT is not a power of two multiple of 'sizeof (void *)'.
 
-
-     This function was introduced in POSIX 1003.1d. Although this
-     function is superseded by `aligned_alloc', it is more portable to
+     This function was introduced in POSIX 1003.1d.  Although this
+     function is superseded by 'aligned_alloc', it is more portable to
      older POSIX systems that do not support ISO C11.
 
  -- Function: void * valloc (size_t SIZE)
      Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe init | AS-Unsafe init lock | AC-Unsafe
      init lock fd mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     Using `valloc' is like using `memalign' and passing the page size
+     Using 'valloc' is like using 'memalign' and passing the page size
      as the value of the second argument.  It is implemented like this:
 
           void *
@@ -6185,8 +6168,8 @@
      *note Query Memory Parameters:: for more information about the
      memory subsystem.
 
-     The `valloc' function is obsolete and `aligned_alloc' or
-     `posix_memalign' should be used instead.
+     The 'valloc' function is obsolete and 'aligned_alloc' or
+     'posix_memalign' should be used instead.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Malloc Tunable Parameters,  Next: Heap Consistency Checking,  Prev: Aligned Memory Blocks,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
@@ -6195,89 +6178,82 @@
 .................................
 
 You can adjust some parameters for dynamic memory allocation with the
-`mallopt' function.  This function is the general SVID/XPG interface,
-defined in `malloc.h'.  
+'mallopt' function.  This function is the general SVID/XPG interface,
+defined in 'malloc.h'.
 
  -- Function: int mallopt (int PARAM, int VALUE)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe init const:mallopt | AS-Unsafe init lock
-     | AC-Unsafe init lock | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
+     Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe init const:mallopt | AS-Unsafe init lock |
+     AC-Unsafe init lock | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     When calling `mallopt', the PARAM argument specifies the parameter
-     to be set, and VALUE the new value to be set.  Possible choices
-     for PARAM, as defined in `malloc.h', are:
+     When calling 'mallopt', the PARAM argument specifies the parameter
+     to be set, and VALUE the new value to be set.  Possible choices for
+     PARAM, as defined in 'malloc.h', are:
 
-    `M_MMAP_MAX'
-          The maximum number of chunks to allocate with `mmap'.
-          Setting this to zero disables all use of `mmap'.
-
-    `M_MMAP_THRESHOLD'
+     'M_MMAP_MAX'
+          The maximum number of chunks to allocate with 'mmap'.  Setting
+          this to zero disables all use of 'mmap'.
+     'M_MMAP_THRESHOLD'
           All chunks larger than this value are allocated outside the
-          normal heap, using the `mmap' system call.  This way it is
-          guaranteed that the memory for these chunks can be returned
-          to the system on `free'.  Note that requests smaller than
-          this threshold might still be allocated via `mmap'.
-
-    `M_PERTURB'
-          If non-zero, memory blocks are filled with values depending
-          on some low order bits of this parameter when they are
-          allocated (except when allocated by `calloc') and freed.
-          This can be used to debug the use of uninitialized or freed
-          heap memory.  Note that this option does not guarantee that
-          the freed block will have any specific values.  It only
-          guarantees that the content the block had before it was freed
-          will be overwritten.
-
-    `M_TOP_PAD'
-          This parameter determines the amount of extra memory to
-          obtain from the system when a call to `sbrk' is required.  It
-          also specifies the number of bytes to retain when shrinking
-          the heap by calling `sbrk' with a negative argument.  This
+          normal heap, using the 'mmap' system call.  This way it is
+          guaranteed that the memory for these chunks can be returned to
+          the system on 'free'.  Note that requests smaller than this
+          threshold might still be allocated via 'mmap'.
+     'M_PERTURB'
+          If non-zero, memory blocks are filled with values depending on
+          some low order bits of this parameter when they are allocated
+          (except when allocated by 'calloc') and freed.  This can be
+          used to debug the use of uninitialized or freed heap memory.
+          Note that this option does not guarantee that the freed block
+          will have any specific values.  It only guarantees that the
+          content the block had before it was freed will be overwritten.
+     'M_TOP_PAD'
+          This parameter determines the amount of extra memory to obtain
+          from the system when a call to 'sbrk' is required.  It also
+          specifies the number of bytes to retain when shrinking the
+          heap by calling 'sbrk' with a negative argument.  This
           provides the necessary hysteresis in heap size such that
           excessive amounts of system calls can be avoided.
-
-    `M_TRIM_THRESHOLD'
+     'M_TRIM_THRESHOLD'
           This is the minimum size (in bytes) of the top-most,
-          releasable chunk that will cause `sbrk' to be called with a
+          releasable chunk that will cause 'sbrk' to be called with a
           negative argument in order to return memory to the system.
 
-
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Heap Consistency Checking,  Next: Hooks for Malloc,  Prev: Malloc Tunable Parameters,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
 
 3.2.2.9 Heap Consistency Checking
 .................................
 
-You can ask `malloc' to check the consistency of dynamic memory by
-using the `mcheck' function.  This function is a GNU extension,
-declared in `mcheck.h'.  
+You can ask 'malloc' to check the consistency of dynamic memory by using
+the 'mcheck' function.  This function is a GNU extension, declared in
+'mcheck.h'.
 
  -- Function: int mcheck (void (*ABORTFN) (enum mcheck_status STATUS))
-     Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe race:mcheck const:malloc_hooks |
-     AS-Unsafe corrupt | AC-Unsafe corrupt | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
+     Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe race:mcheck const:malloc_hooks | AS-Unsafe
+     corrupt | AC-Unsafe corrupt | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     Calling `mcheck' tells `malloc' to perform occasional consistency
+     Calling 'mcheck' tells 'malloc' to perform occasional consistency
      checks.  These will catch things such as writing past the end of a
-     block that was allocated with `malloc'.
+     block that was allocated with 'malloc'.
 
      The ABORTFN argument is the function to call when an inconsistency
-     is found.  If you supply a null pointer, then `mcheck' uses a
-     default function which prints a message and calls `abort' (*note
+     is found.  If you supply a null pointer, then 'mcheck' uses a
+     default function which prints a message and calls 'abort' (*note
      Aborting a Program::).  The function you supply is called with one
      argument, which says what sort of inconsistency was detected; its
      type is described below.
 
      It is too late to begin allocation checking once you have allocated
-     anything with `malloc'.  So `mcheck' does nothing in that case.
-     The function returns `-1' if you call it too late, and `0'
+     anything with 'malloc'.  So 'mcheck' does nothing in that case.
+     The function returns '-1' if you call it too late, and '0'
      otherwise (when it is successful).
 
-     The easiest way to arrange to call `mcheck' early enough is to use
-     the option `-lmcheck' when you link your program; then you don't
-     need to modify your program source at all.  Alternatively you
-     might use a debugger to insert a call to `mcheck' whenever the
-     program is started, for example these gdb commands will
-     automatically call `mcheck' whenever the program starts:
+     The easiest way to arrange to call 'mcheck' early enough is to use
+     the option '-lmcheck' when you link your program; then you don't
+     need to modify your program source at all.  Alternatively you might
+     use a debugger to insert a call to 'mcheck' whenever the program is
+     started, for example these gdb commands will automatically call
+     'mcheck' whenever the program starts:
 
           (gdb) break main
           Breakpoint 1, main (argc=2, argv=0xbffff964) at whatever.c:10
@@ -6290,23 +6266,21 @@
           (gdb) ...
 
      This will however only work if no initialization function of any
-     object involved calls any of the `malloc' functions since `mcheck'
+     object involved calls any of the 'malloc' functions since 'mcheck'
      must be called before the first such function.
 
-
  -- Function: enum mcheck_status mprobe (void *POINTER)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe race:mcheck const:malloc_hooks |
-     AS-Unsafe corrupt | AC-Unsafe corrupt | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
+     Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe race:mcheck const:malloc_hooks | AS-Unsafe
+     corrupt | AC-Unsafe corrupt | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `mprobe' function lets you explicitly check for inconsistencies
+     The 'mprobe' function lets you explicitly check for inconsistencies
      in a particular allocated block.  You must have already called
-     `mcheck' at the beginning of the program, to do its occasional
-     checks; calling `mprobe' requests an additional consistency check
+     'mcheck' at the beginning of the program, to do its occasional
+     checks; calling 'mprobe' requests an additional consistency check
      to be done at the time of the call.
 
-     The argument POINTER must be a pointer returned by `malloc' or
-     `realloc'.  `mprobe' returns a value that says what inconsistency,
+     The argument POINTER must be a pointer returned by 'malloc' or
+     'realloc'.  'mprobe' returns a value that says what inconsistency,
      if any, was found.  The values are described below.
 
  -- Data Type: enum mcheck_status
@@ -6314,52 +6288,48 @@
      detected in an allocated block, if any.  Here are the possible
      values:
 
-    `MCHECK_DISABLED'
-          `mcheck' was not called before the first allocation.  No
+     'MCHECK_DISABLED'
+          'mcheck' was not called before the first allocation.  No
           consistency checking can be done.
-
-    `MCHECK_OK'
+     'MCHECK_OK'
           No inconsistency detected.
-
-    `MCHECK_HEAD'
+     'MCHECK_HEAD'
           The data immediately before the block was modified.  This
-          commonly happens when an array index or pointer is
-          decremented too far.
-
-    `MCHECK_TAIL'
+          commonly happens when an array index or pointer is decremented
+          too far.
+     'MCHECK_TAIL'
           The data immediately after the block was modified.  This
-          commonly happens when an array index or pointer is
-          incremented too far.
-
-    `MCHECK_FREE'
+          commonly happens when an array index or pointer is incremented
+          too far.
+     'MCHECK_FREE'
           The block was already freed.
 
    Another possibility to check for and guard against bugs in the use of
-`malloc', `realloc' and `free' is to set the environment variable
-`MALLOC_CHECK_'.  When `MALLOC_CHECK_' is set, a special (less
+'malloc', 'realloc' and 'free' is to set the environment variable
+'MALLOC_CHECK_'.  When 'MALLOC_CHECK_' is set, a special (less
 efficient) implementation is used which is designed to be tolerant
-against simple errors, such as double calls of `free' with the same
+against simple errors, such as double calls of 'free' with the same
 argument, or overruns of a single byte (off-by-one bugs).  Not all such
 errors can be protected against, however, and memory leaks can result.
-If `MALLOC_CHECK_' is set to `0', any detected heap corruption is
-silently ignored; if set to `1', a diagnostic is printed on `stderr';
-if set to `2', `abort' is called immediately.  This can be useful
-because otherwise a crash may happen much later, and the true cause for
-the problem is then very hard to track down.
+If 'MALLOC_CHECK_' is set to '0', any detected heap corruption is
+silently ignored; if set to '1', a diagnostic is printed on 'stderr'; if
+set to '2', 'abort' is called immediately.  This can be useful because
+otherwise a crash may happen much later, and the true cause for the
+problem is then very hard to track down.
 
-   There is one problem with `MALLOC_CHECK_': in SUID or SGID binaries
+   There is one problem with 'MALLOC_CHECK_': in SUID or SGID binaries
 it could possibly be exploited since diverging from the normal programs
 behavior it now writes something to the standard error descriptor.
-Therefore the use of `MALLOC_CHECK_' is disabled by default for SUID
-and SGID binaries.  It can be enabled again by the system administrator
-by adding a file `/etc/suid-debug' (the content is not important it
-could be empty).
+Therefore the use of 'MALLOC_CHECK_' is disabled by default for SUID and
+SGID binaries.  It can be enabled again by the system administrator by
+adding a file '/etc/suid-debug' (the content is not important it could
+be empty).
 
-   So, what's the difference between using `MALLOC_CHECK_' and linking
-with `-lmcheck'?  `MALLOC_CHECK_' is orthogonal with respect to
-`-lmcheck'.  `-lmcheck' has been added for backward compatibility.
-Both `MALLOC_CHECK_' and `-lmcheck' should uncover the same bugs - but
-using `MALLOC_CHECK_' you don't need to recompile your application.
+   So, what's the difference between using 'MALLOC_CHECK_' and linking
+with '-lmcheck'?  'MALLOC_CHECK_' is orthogonal with respect to
+'-lmcheck'.  '-lmcheck' has been added for backward compatibility.  Both
+'MALLOC_CHECK_' and '-lmcheck' should uncover the same bugs - but using
+'MALLOC_CHECK_' you don't need to recompile your application.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Hooks for Malloc,  Next: Statistics of Malloc,  Prev: Heap Consistency Checking,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
@@ -6367,94 +6337,94 @@
 3.2.2.10 Memory Allocation Hooks
 ................................
 
-The GNU C Library lets you modify the behavior of `malloc', `realloc',
-and `free' by specifying appropriate hook functions.  You can use these
-hooks to help you debug programs that use dynamic memory allocation,
-for example.
+The GNU C Library lets you modify the behavior of 'malloc', 'realloc',
+and 'free' by specifying appropriate hook functions.  You can use these
+hooks to help you debug programs that use dynamic memory allocation, for
+example.
 
-   The hook variables are declared in `malloc.h'.  
+   The hook variables are declared in 'malloc.h'.
 
  -- Variable: __malloc_hook
      The value of this variable is a pointer to the function that
-     `malloc' uses whenever it is called.  You should define this
-     function to look like `malloc'; that is, like:
+     'malloc' uses whenever it is called.  You should define this
+     function to look like 'malloc'; that is, like:
 
           void *FUNCTION (size_t SIZE, const void *CALLER)
 
      The value of CALLER is the return address found on the stack when
-     the `malloc' function was called.  This value allows you to trace
+     the 'malloc' function was called.  This value allows you to trace
      the memory consumption of the program.
 
  -- Variable: __realloc_hook
-     The value of this variable is a pointer to function that `realloc'
+     The value of this variable is a pointer to function that 'realloc'
      uses whenever it is called.  You should define this function to
-     look like `realloc'; that is, like:
+     look like 'realloc'; that is, like:
 
           void *FUNCTION (void *PTR, size_t SIZE, const void *CALLER)
 
      The value of CALLER is the return address found on the stack when
-     the `realloc' function was called.  This value allows you to trace
+     the 'realloc' function was called.  This value allows you to trace
      the memory consumption of the program.
 
  -- Variable: __free_hook
-     The value of this variable is a pointer to function that `free'
+     The value of this variable is a pointer to function that 'free'
      uses whenever it is called.  You should define this function to
-     look like `free'; that is, like:
+     look like 'free'; that is, like:
 
           void FUNCTION (void *PTR, const void *CALLER)
 
      The value of CALLER is the return address found on the stack when
-     the `free' function was called.  This value allows you to trace the
+     the 'free' function was called.  This value allows you to trace the
      memory consumption of the program.
 
  -- Variable: __memalign_hook
      The value of this variable is a pointer to function that
-     `aligned_alloc', `memalign', `posix_memalign' and `valloc' use
-     whenever they are called. You should define this function to look
-     like `aligned_alloc'; that is, like:
+     'aligned_alloc', 'memalign', 'posix_memalign' and 'valloc' use
+     whenever they are called.  You should define this function to look
+     like 'aligned_alloc'; that is, like:
 
           void *FUNCTION (size_t ALIGNMENT, size_t SIZE, const void *CALLER)
 
      The value of CALLER is the return address found on the stack when
-     the `aligned_alloc', `memalign', `posix_memalign' or `valloc'
+     the 'aligned_alloc', 'memalign', 'posix_memalign' or 'valloc'
      functions are called.  This value allows you to trace the memory
      consumption of the program.
 
    You must make sure that the function you install as a hook for one of
 these functions does not call that function recursively without
-restoring the old value of the hook first!  Otherwise, your program
-will get stuck in an infinite recursion.  Before calling the function
+restoring the old value of the hook first!  Otherwise, your program will
+get stuck in an infinite recursion.  Before calling the function
 recursively, one should make sure to restore all the hooks to their
-previous value.  When coming back from the recursive call, all the
-hooks should be resaved since a hook might modify itself.
+previous value.  When coming back from the recursive call, all the hooks
+should be resaved since a hook might modify itself.
 
  -- Variable: __malloc_initialize_hook
      The value of this variable is a pointer to a function that is
-     called once when the malloc implementation is initialized.  This
-     is a weak variable, so it can be overridden in the application
-     with a definition like the following:
+     called once when the malloc implementation is initialized.  This is
+     a weak variable, so it can be overridden in the application with a
+     definition like the following:
 
           void (*__MALLOC_INITIALIZE_HOOK) (void) = my_init_hook;
 
    An issue to look out for is the time at which the malloc hook
 functions can be safely installed.  If the hook functions call the
 malloc-related functions recursively, it is necessary that malloc has
-already properly initialized itself at the time when `__malloc_hook'
-etc. is assigned to.  On the other hand, if the hook functions provide a
-complete malloc implementation of their own, it is vital that the hooks
-are assigned to _before_ the very first `malloc' call has completed,
-because otherwise a chunk obtained from the ordinary, un-hooked malloc
-may later be handed to `__free_hook', for example.
+already properly initialized itself at the time when '__malloc_hook'
+etc.  is assigned to.  On the other hand, if the hook functions provide
+a complete malloc implementation of their own, it is vital that the
+hooks are assigned to _before_ the very first 'malloc' call has
+completed, because otherwise a chunk obtained from the ordinary,
+un-hooked malloc may later be handed to '__free_hook', for example.
 
    In both cases, the problem can be solved by setting up the hooks from
 within a user-defined function pointed to by
-`__malloc_initialize_hook'--then the hooks will be set up safely at the
+'__malloc_initialize_hook'--then the hooks will be set up safely at the
 right time.
 
-   Here is an example showing how to use `__malloc_hook' and
-`__free_hook' properly.  It installs a function that prints out
-information every time `malloc' or `free' is called.  We just assume
-here that `realloc' and `memalign' are not used in our program.
+   Here is an example showing how to use '__malloc_hook' and
+'__free_hook' properly.  It installs a function that prints out
+information every time 'malloc' or 'free' is called.  We just assume
+here that 'realloc' and 'memalign' are not used in our program.
 
      /* Prototypes for __malloc_hook, __free_hook */
      #include <malloc.h>
@@ -6488,7 +6458,7 @@
        /* Save underlying hooks */
        old_malloc_hook = __malloc_hook;
        old_free_hook = __free_hook;
-       /* `printf' might call `malloc', so protect it too. */
+       /* 'printf' might call 'malloc', so protect it too. */
        printf ("malloc (%u) returns %p\n", (unsigned int) size, result);
        /* Restore our own hooks */
        __malloc_hook = my_malloc_hook;
@@ -6507,7 +6477,7 @@
        /* Save underlying hooks */
        old_malloc_hook = __malloc_hook;
        old_free_hook = __free_hook;
-       /* `printf' might call `free', so protect it too. */
+       /* 'printf' might call 'free', so protect it too. */
        printf ("freed pointer %p\n", ptr);
        /* Restore our own hooks */
        __malloc_hook = my_malloc_hook;
@@ -6519,133 +6489,132 @@
        ...
      }
 
-   The `mcheck' function (*note Heap Consistency Checking::) works by
+   The 'mcheck' function (*note Heap Consistency Checking::) works by
 installing such hooks.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Statistics of Malloc,  Next: Summary of Malloc,  Prev: Hooks for Malloc,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
 
-3.2.2.11 Statistics for Memory Allocation with `malloc'
+3.2.2.11 Statistics for Memory Allocation with 'malloc'
 .......................................................
 
 You can get information about dynamic memory allocation by calling the
-`mallinfo' function.  This function and its associated data type are
-declared in `malloc.h'; they are an extension of the standard SVID/XPG
-version.  
+'mallinfo' function.  This function and its associated data type are
+declared in 'malloc.h'; they are an extension of the standard SVID/XPG
+version.
 
  -- Data Type: struct mallinfo
      This structure type is used to return information about the dynamic
      memory allocator.  It contains the following members:
 
-    `int arena'
-          This is the total size of memory allocated with `sbrk' by
-          `malloc', in bytes.
+     'int arena'
+          This is the total size of memory allocated with 'sbrk' by
+          'malloc', in bytes.
 
-    `int ordblks'
+     'int ordblks'
           This is the number of chunks not in use.  (The memory
           allocator internally gets chunks of memory from the operating
-          system, and then carves them up to satisfy individual
-          `malloc' requests; see *note Efficiency and Malloc::.)
+          system, and then carves them up to satisfy individual 'malloc'
+          requests; see *note Efficiency and Malloc::.)
 
-    `int smblks'
+     'int smblks'
           This field is unused.
 
-    `int hblks'
-          This is the total number of chunks allocated with `mmap'.
+     'int hblks'
+          This is the total number of chunks allocated with 'mmap'.
 
-    `int hblkhd'
-          This is the total size of memory allocated with `mmap', in
+     'int hblkhd'
+          This is the total size of memory allocated with 'mmap', in
           bytes.
 
-    `int usmblks'
+     'int usmblks'
           This field is unused.
 
-    `int fsmblks'
+     'int fsmblks'
           This field is unused.
 
-    `int uordblks'
-          This is the total size of memory occupied by chunks handed
-          out by `malloc'.
+     'int uordblks'
+          This is the total size of memory occupied by chunks handed out
+          by 'malloc'.
 
-    `int fordblks'
-          This is the total size of memory occupied by free (not in
-          use) chunks.
+     'int fordblks'
+          This is the total size of memory occupied by free (not in use)
+          chunks.
 
-    `int keepcost'
+     'int keepcost'
           This is the size of the top-most releasable chunk that
           normally borders the end of the heap (i.e., the high end of
           the virtual address space's data segment).
 
-
  -- Function: struct mallinfo mallinfo (void)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe init const:mallopt | AS-Unsafe init lock
-     | AC-Unsafe init lock | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
+     Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe init const:mallopt | AS-Unsafe init lock |
+     AC-Unsafe init lock | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
      This function returns information about the current dynamic memory
-     usage in a structure of type `struct mallinfo'.
+     usage in a structure of type 'struct mallinfo'.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Summary of Malloc,  Prev: Statistics of Malloc,  Up: Unconstrained Allocation
 
-3.2.2.12 Summary of `malloc'-Related Functions
+3.2.2.12 Summary of 'malloc'-Related Functions
 ..............................................
 
-Here is a summary of the functions that work with `malloc':
+Here is a summary of the functions that work with 'malloc':
 
-`void *malloc (size_t SIZE)'
+'void *malloc (size_t SIZE)'
      Allocate a block of SIZE bytes.  *Note Basic Allocation::.
 
-`void free (void *ADDR)'
-     Free a block previously allocated by `malloc'.  *Note Freeing
-     after Malloc::.
+'void free (void *ADDR)'
+     Free a block previously allocated by 'malloc'.  *Note Freeing after
+     Malloc::.
 
-`void *realloc (void *ADDR, size_t SIZE)'
-     Make a block previously allocated by `malloc' larger or smaller,
+'void *realloc (void *ADDR, size_t SIZE)'
+     Make a block previously allocated by 'malloc' larger or smaller,
      possibly by copying it to a new location.  *Note Changing Block
      Size::.
 
-`void *calloc (size_t COUNT, size_t ELTSIZE)'
-     Allocate a block of COUNT * ELTSIZE bytes using `malloc', and set
+'void *calloc (size_t COUNT, size_t ELTSIZE)'
+     Allocate a block of COUNT * ELTSIZE bytes using 'malloc', and set
      its contents to zero.  *Note Allocating Cleared Space::.
 
-`void *valloc (size_t SIZE)'
-     Allocate a block of SIZE bytes, starting on a page boundary.
-     *Note Aligned Memory Blocks::.
+'void *valloc (size_t SIZE)'
+     Allocate a block of SIZE bytes, starting on a page boundary.  *Note
+     Aligned Memory Blocks::.
 
-`void *aligned_alloc (size_t SIZE, size_t ALIGNMENT)'
+'void *aligned_alloc (size_t SIZE, size_t ALIGNMENT)'
      Allocate a block of SIZE bytes, starting on an address that is a
      multiple of ALIGNMENT.  *Note Aligned Memory Blocks::.
 
-`int posix_memalign (void **MEMPTR, size_t ALIGNMENT, size_t SIZE)'
+'int posix_memalign (void **MEMPTR, size_t ALIGNMENT, size_t SIZE)'
      Allocate a block of SIZE bytes, starting on an address that is a
      multiple of ALIGNMENT.  *Note Aligned Memory Blocks::.
 
-`void *memalign (size_t SIZE, size_t BOUNDARY)'
+'void *memalign (size_t SIZE, size_t BOUNDARY)'
      Allocate a block of SIZE bytes, starting on an address that is a
      multiple of BOUNDARY.  *Note Aligned Memory Blocks::.
 
-`int mallopt (int PARAM, int VALUE)'
+'int mallopt (int PARAM, int VALUE)'
      Adjust a tunable parameter.  *Note Malloc Tunable Parameters::.
 
-`int mcheck (void (*ABORTFN) (void))'
-     Tell `malloc' to perform occasional consistency checks on
+'int mcheck (void (*ABORTFN) (void))'
+     Tell 'malloc' to perform occasional consistency checks on
      dynamically allocated memory, and to call ABORTFN when an
      inconsistency is found.  *Note Heap Consistency Checking::.
 
-`void *(*__malloc_hook) (size_t SIZE, const void *CALLER)'
-     A pointer to a function that `malloc' uses whenever it is called.
+'void *(*__malloc_hook) (size_t SIZE, const void *CALLER)'
+     A pointer to a function that 'malloc' uses whenever it is called.
 
-`void *(*__realloc_hook) (void *PTR, size_t SIZE, const void *CALLER)'
-     A pointer to a function that `realloc' uses whenever it is called.
+'void *(*__realloc_hook) (void *PTR, size_t SIZE, const void *CALLER)'
+     A pointer to a function that 'realloc' uses whenever it is called.
 
-`void (*__free_hook) (void *PTR, const void *CALLER)'
-     A pointer to a function that `free' uses whenever it is called.
+'void (*__free_hook) (void *PTR, const void *CALLER)'
+     A pointer to a function that 'free' uses whenever it is called.
 
-`void (*__memalign_hook) (size_t SIZE, size_t ALIGNMENT, const void *CALLER)'
-     A pointer to a function that `aligned_alloc', `memalign',
-     `posix_memalign' and `valloc' use whenever they are called.
+'void (*__memalign_hook) (size_t SIZE, size_t ALIGNMENT, const void *CALLER)'
+     A pointer to a function that 'aligned_alloc', 'memalign',
+     'posix_memalign' and 'valloc' use whenever they are called.
 
-`struct mallinfo mallinfo (void)'
+'struct mallinfo mallinfo (void)'
      Return information about the current dynamic memory usage.  *Note
      Statistics of Malloc::.
 
@@ -6661,10 +6630,10 @@
 freed at the end of their lifetime.  If this does not happen the system
 runs out of memory, sooner or later.
 
-   The `malloc' implementation in the GNU C Library provides some
-simple means to detect such leaks and obtain some information to find
-the location.  To do this the application must be started in a special
-mode which is enabled by an environment variable.  There are no speed
+   The 'malloc' implementation in the GNU C Library provides some simple
+means to detect such leaks and obtain some information to find the
+location.  To do this the application must be started in a special mode
+which is enabled by an environment variable.  There are no speed
 penalties for the program if the debugging mode is not enabled.
 
 * Menu:
@@ -6685,40 +6654,40 @@
      AS-Unsafe init heap corrupt lock | AC-Unsafe init corrupt lock fd
      mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     When the `mtrace' function is called it looks for an environment
-     variable named `MALLOC_TRACE'.  This variable is supposed to
+     When the 'mtrace' function is called it looks for an environment
+     variable named 'MALLOC_TRACE'.  This variable is supposed to
      contain a valid file name.  The user must have write access.  If
      the file already exists it is truncated.  If the environment
      variable is not set or it does not name a valid file which can be
-     opened for writing nothing is done.  The behavior of `malloc' etc.
+     opened for writing nothing is done.  The behavior of 'malloc' etc.
      is not changed.  For obvious reasons this also happens if the
      application is installed with the SUID or SGID bit set.
 
-     If the named file is successfully opened, `mtrace' installs special
-     handlers for the functions `malloc', `realloc', and `free' (*note
-     Hooks for Malloc::).  From then on, all uses of these functions
-     are traced and protocolled into the file.  There is now of course
-     a speed penalty for all calls to the traced functions so tracing
+     If the named file is successfully opened, 'mtrace' installs special
+     handlers for the functions 'malloc', 'realloc', and 'free' (*note
+     Hooks for Malloc::).  From then on, all uses of these functions are
+     traced and protocolled into the file.  There is now of course a
+     speed penalty for all calls to the traced functions so tracing
      should not be enabled during normal use.
 
      This function is a GNU extension and generally not available on
-     other systems.  The prototype can be found in `mcheck.h'.
+     other systems.  The prototype can be found in 'mcheck.h'.
 
  -- Function: void muntrace (void)
      Preliminary: | MT-Unsafe race:mtrace const:malloc_hooks locale |
      AS-Unsafe corrupt heap | AC-Unsafe corrupt mem lock fd | *Note
      POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     The `muntrace' function can be called after `mtrace' was used to
-     enable tracing the `malloc' calls.  If no (successful) call of
-     `mtrace' was made `muntrace' does nothing.
+     The 'muntrace' function can be called after 'mtrace' was used to
+     enable tracing the 'malloc' calls.  If no (successful) call of
+     'mtrace' was made 'muntrace' does nothing.
 
-     Otherwise it deinstalls the handlers for `malloc', `realloc', and
-     `free' and then closes the protocol file.  No calls are
-     protocolled anymore and the program runs again at full speed.
+     Otherwise it deinstalls the handlers for 'malloc', 'realloc', and
+     'free' and then closes the protocol file.  No calls are protocolled
+     anymore and the program runs again at full speed.
 
      This function is a GNU extension and generally not available on
-     other systems.  The prototype can be found in `mcheck.h'.
+     other systems.  The prototype can be found in 'mcheck.h'.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Using the Memory Debugger,  Next: Tips for the Memory Debugger,  Prev: Tracing malloc,  Up: Allocation Debugging
@@ -6727,11 +6696,11 @@
 ................................
 
 Even though the tracing functionality does not influence the runtime
-behavior of the program it is not a good idea to call `mtrace' in all
-programs.  Just imagine that you debug a program using `mtrace' and all
-other programs used in the debugging session also trace their `malloc'
+behavior of the program it is not a good idea to call 'mtrace' in all
+programs.  Just imagine that you debug a program using 'mtrace' and all
+other programs used in the debugging session also trace their 'malloc'
 calls.  The output file would be the same for all programs and thus is
-unusable.  Therefore one should call `mtrace' only if compiled for
+unusable.  Therefore one should call 'mtrace' only if compiled for
 debugging.  A program could therefore start like this:
 
      #include <mcheck.h>
@@ -6747,21 +6716,21 @@
 
    This is all what is needed if you want to trace the calls during the
 whole runtime of the program.  Alternatively you can stop the tracing at
-any time with a call to `muntrace'.  It is even possible to restart the
-tracing again with a new call to `mtrace'.  But this can cause
+any time with a call to 'muntrace'.  It is even possible to restart the
+tracing again with a new call to 'mtrace'.  But this can cause
 unreliable results since there may be calls of the functions which are
 not called.  Please note that not only the application uses the traced
 functions, also libraries (including the C library itself) use these
 functions.
 
-   This last point is also why it is no good idea to call `muntrace'
+   This last point is also why it is no good idea to call 'muntrace'
 before the program terminated.  The libraries are informed about the
-termination of the program only after the program returns from `main'
-or calls `exit' and so cannot free the memory they use before this time.
+termination of the program only after the program returns from 'main' or
+calls 'exit' and so cannot free the memory they use before this time.
 
-   So the best thing one can do is to call `mtrace' as the very first
-function in the program and never call `muntrace'.  So the program
-traces almost all uses of the `malloc' functions (except those calls
+   So the best thing one can do is to call 'mtrace' as the very first
+function in the program and never call 'muntrace'.  So the program
+traces almost all uses of the 'malloc' functions (except those calls
 which are executed by constructors of the program or used libraries).
 
 
@@ -6806,9 +6775,9 @@
      }
 
    I.e., the user can start the memory debugger any time s/he wants if
-the program was started with `MALLOC_TRACE' set in the environment.
-The output will of course not show the allocations which happened before
-the first signal but if there is a memory leak this will show up
+the program was started with 'MALLOC_TRACE' set in the environment.  The
+output will of course not show the allocations which happened before the
+first signal but if there is a memory leak this will show up
 nevertheless.
 
 
@@ -6833,20 +6802,20 @@
 not meant to be read by a human.  Therefore no attention is given to
 readability.  Instead there is a program which comes with the GNU C
 Library which interprets the traces and outputs a summary in an
-user-friendly way.  The program is called `mtrace' (it is in fact a
-Perl script) and it takes one or two arguments.  In any case the name of
-the file with the trace output must be specified.  If an optional
-argument precedes the name of the trace file this must be the name of
-the program which generated the trace.
+user-friendly way.  The program is called 'mtrace' (it is in fact a Perl
+script) and it takes one or two arguments.  In any case the name of the
+file with the trace output must be specified.  If an optional argument
+precedes the name of the trace file this must be the name of the program
+which generated the trace.
 
      drepper$ mtrace tst-mtrace log
      No memory leaks.
 
-   In this case the program `tst-mtrace' was run and it produced a
-trace file `log'.  The message printed by `mtrace' shows there are no
-problems with the code, all allocated memory was freed afterwards.
+   In this case the program 'tst-mtrace' was run and it produced a trace
+file 'log'.  The message printed by 'mtrace' shows there are no problems
+with the code, all allocated memory was freed afterwards.
 
-   If we call `mtrace' on the example trace given above we would get a
+   If we call 'mtrace' on the example trace given above we would get a
 different outout:
 
      drepper$ mtrace errlog
@@ -6862,7 +6831,7 @@
      0x08064c78     0x14  at 0x80481eb
      0x08064c90     0x14  at 0x80481eb
 
-   We have called `mtrace' with only one argument and so the script has
+   We have called 'mtrace' with only one argument and so the script has
 no chance to find out what is meant with the addresses given in the
 trace.  We can do better:
 
@@ -6883,7 +6852,7 @@
 immediately where the function calls causing the trouble can be found.
 
    Interpreting this output is not complicated.  There are at most two
-different situations being detected.  First, `free' was called for
+different situations being detected.  First, 'free' was called for
 pointers which were never returned by one of the allocation functions.
 This is usually a very bad problem and what this looks like is shown in
 the first three lines of the output.  Situations like this are quite
@@ -6891,11 +6860,11 @@
 normally crashes.
 
    The other situation which is much harder to detect are memory leaks.
-As you can see in the output the `mtrace' function collects all this
+As you can see in the output the 'mtrace' function collects all this
 information and so can say that the program calls an allocation function
-from line 33 in the source file `/home/drepper/tst-mtrace.c' four times
-without freeing this memory before the program terminates.  Whether
-this is a real problem remains to be investigated.
+from line 33 in the source file '/home/drepper/tst-mtrace.c' four times
+without freeing this memory before the program terminates.  Whether this
+is a real problem remains to be investigated.
 
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Obstacks,  Next: Variable Size Automatic,  Prev: Allocation Debugging,  Up: Memory Allocation
@@ -6903,8 +6872,8 @@
 3.2.4 Obstacks
 --------------
 
-An "obstack" is a pool of memory containing a stack of objects.  You
-can create any number of separate obstacks, and then allocate objects in
+An "obstack" is a pool of memory containing a stack of objects.  You can
+create any number of separate obstacks, and then allocate objects in
 specified obstacks.  Within each obstack, the last object allocated must
 always be the first one freed, but distinct obstacks are independent of
 each other.
@@ -6941,29 +6910,29 @@
 .........................
 
 The utilities for manipulating obstacks are declared in the header file
-`obstack.h'.  
+'obstack.h'.
 
  -- Data Type: struct obstack
-     An obstack is represented by a data structure of type `struct
+     An obstack is represented by a data structure of type 'struct
      obstack'.  This structure has a small fixed size; it records the
      status of the obstack and how to find the space in which objects
      are allocated.  It does not contain any of the objects themselves.
      You should not try to access the contents of the structure
      directly; use only the functions described in this chapter.
 
-   You can declare variables of type `struct obstack' and use them as
+   You can declare variables of type 'struct obstack' and use them as
 obstacks, or you can allocate obstacks dynamically like any other kind
 of object.  Dynamic allocation of obstacks allows your program to have a
 variable number of different stacks.  (You can even allocate an obstack
 structure in another obstack, but this is rarely useful.)
 
    All the functions that work with obstacks require you to specify
-which obstack to use.  You do this with a pointer of type `struct
+which obstack to use.  You do this with a pointer of type 'struct
 obstack *'.  In the following, we often say "an obstack" when strictly
 speaking the object at hand is such a pointer.
 
    The objects in the obstack are packed into large blocks called
-"chunks".  The `struct obstack' structure points to a chain of the
+"chunks".  The 'struct obstack' structure points to a chain of the
 chunks currently in use.
 
    The obstack library obtains a new chunk whenever you allocate an
@@ -6971,7 +6940,7 @@
 manages chunks automatically, you don't need to pay much attention to
 them, but you do need to supply a function which the obstack library
 should use to get a chunk.  Usually you supply a function which uses
-`malloc' directly or indirectly.  You must also supply a function to
+'malloc' directly or indirectly.  You must also supply a function to
 free a chunk.  These matters are described in the following section.
 
 
@@ -6981,40 +6950,40 @@
 ....................................
 
 Each source file in which you plan to use the obstack functions must
-include the header file `obstack.h', like this:
+include the header file 'obstack.h', like this:
 
      #include <obstack.h>
 
-   Also, if the source file uses the macro `obstack_init', it must
+   Also, if the source file uses the macro 'obstack_init', it must
 declare or define two functions or macros that will be called by the
-obstack library.  One, `obstack_chunk_alloc', is used to allocate the
+obstack library.  One, 'obstack_chunk_alloc', is used to allocate the
 chunks of memory into which objects are packed.  The other,
-`obstack_chunk_free', is used to return chunks when the objects in them
-are freed.  These macros should appear before any use of obstacks in
-the source file.
+'obstack_chunk_free', is used to return chunks when the objects in them
+are freed.  These macros should appear before any use of obstacks in the
+source file.
 
-   Usually these are defined to use `malloc' via the intermediary
-`xmalloc' (*note Unconstrained Allocation::).  This is done with the
+   Usually these are defined to use 'malloc' via the intermediary
+'xmalloc' (*note Unconstrained Allocation::).  This is done with the
 following pair of macro definitions:
 
      #define obstack_chunk_alloc xmalloc
      #define obstack_chunk_free free
 
-Though the memory you get using obstacks really comes from `malloc',
-using obstacks is faster because `malloc' is called less often, for
+Though the memory you get using obstacks really comes from 'malloc',
+using obstacks is faster because 'malloc' is called less often, for
 larger blocks of memory.  *Note Obstack Chunks::, for full details.
 
-   At run time, before the program can use a `struct obstack' object as
-an obstack, it must initialize the obstack by calling `obstack_init'.
+   At run time, before the program can use a 'struct obstack' object as
+an obstack, it must initialize the obstack by calling 'obstack_init'.
 
  -- Function: int obstack_init (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Safe mem |
      *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
      Initialize obstack OBSTACK-PTR for allocation of objects.  This
-     function calls the obstack's `obstack_chunk_alloc' function.  If
+     function calls the obstack's 'obstack_chunk_alloc' function.  If
      allocation of memory fails, the function pointed to by
-     `obstack_alloc_failed_handler' is called.  The `obstack_init'
+     'obstack_alloc_failed_handler' is called.  The 'obstack_init'
      function always returns 1 (Compatibility notice: Former versions of
      obstack returned 0 if allocation failed).
 
@@ -7034,17 +7003,16 @@
 
  -- Variable: obstack_alloc_failed_handler
      The value of this variable is a pointer to a function that
-     `obstack' uses when `obstack_chunk_alloc' fails to allocate
-     memory.  The default action is to print a message and abort.  You
-     should supply a function that either calls `exit' (*note Program
-     Termination::) or `longjmp' (*note Non-Local Exits::) and doesn't
+     'obstack' uses when 'obstack_chunk_alloc' fails to allocate memory.
+     The default action is to print a message and abort.  You should
+     supply a function that either calls 'exit' (*note Program
+     Termination::) or 'longjmp' (*note Non-Local Exits::) and doesn't
      return.
 
           void my_obstack_alloc_failed (void)
           ...
           obstack_alloc_failed_handler = &my_obstack_alloc_failed;
 
-
 
 File: libc.info,  Node: Allocation in an Obstack,  Next: Freeing Obstack Objects,  Prev: Preparing for Obstacks,  Up: Obstacks
 
@@ -7052,7 +7020,7 @@
 ................................
 
 The most direct way to allocate an object in an obstack is with
-`obstack_alloc', which is invoked almost like `malloc'.
+'obstack_alloc', which is invoked almost like 'malloc'.
 
  -- Function: void * obstack_alloc (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, int
           SIZE)
@@ -7061,17 +7029,17 @@
 
      This allocates an uninitialized block of SIZE bytes in an obstack
      and returns its address.  Here OBSTACK-PTR specifies which obstack
-     to allocate the block in; it is the address of the `struct obstack'
+     to allocate the block in; it is the address of the 'struct obstack'
      object which represents the obstack.  Each obstack function or
      macro requires you to specify an OBSTACK-PTR as the first argument.
 
-     This function calls the obstack's `obstack_chunk_alloc' function if
+     This function calls the obstack's 'obstack_chunk_alloc' function if
      it needs to allocate a new chunk of memory; it calls
-     `obstack_alloc_failed_handler' if allocation of memory by
-     `obstack_chunk_alloc' failed.
+     'obstack_alloc_failed_handler' if allocation of memory by
+     'obstack_chunk_alloc' failed.
 
    For example, here is a function that allocates a copy of a string STR
-in a specific obstack, which is in the variable `string_obstack':
+in a specific obstack, which is in the variable 'string_obstack':
 
      struct obstack string_obstack;
 
@@ -7085,7 +7053,7 @@
      }
 
    To allocate a block with specified contents, use the function
-`obstack_copy', declared like this:
+'obstack_copy', declared like this:
 
  -- Function: void * obstack_copy (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void
           *ADDRESS, int SIZE)
@@ -7093,18 +7061,18 @@
      corrupt mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
      This allocates a block and initializes it by copying SIZE bytes of
-     data starting at ADDRESS.  It calls `obstack_alloc_failed_handler'
-     if allocation of memory by `obstack_chunk_alloc' failed.
+     data starting at ADDRESS.  It calls 'obstack_alloc_failed_handler'
+     if allocation of memory by 'obstack_chunk_alloc' failed.
 
  -- Function: void * obstack_copy0 (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void
           *ADDRESS, int SIZE)
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
      corrupt mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     Like `obstack_copy', but appends an extra byte containing a null
+     Like 'obstack_copy', but appends an extra byte containing a null
      character.  This extra byte is not counted in the argument SIZE.
 
-   The `obstack_copy0' function is convenient for copying a sequence of
+   The 'obstack_copy0' function is convenient for copying a sequence of
 characters into an obstack as a null-terminated string.  Here is an
 example of its use:
 
@@ -7114,7 +7082,7 @@
        return obstack_copy0 (&myobstack, addr, size);
      }
 
-Contrast this with the previous example of `savestring' using `malloc'
+Contrast this with the previous example of 'savestring' using 'malloc'
 (*note Basic Allocation::).
 
 
@@ -7124,7 +7092,7 @@
 .....................................
 
 To free an object allocated in an obstack, use the function
-`obstack_free'.  Since the obstack is a stack of objects, freeing one
+'obstack_free'.  Since the obstack is a stack of objects, freeing one
 object automatically frees all other objects allocated more recently in
 the same obstack.
 
@@ -7133,15 +7101,15 @@
      Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
      corrupt | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
 
-     If OBJECT is a null pointer, everything allocated in the obstack
-     is freed.  Otherwise, OBJECT must be the address of an object
+     If OBJECT is a null pointer, everything allocated in the obstack is
+     freed.  Otherwise, OBJECT must be the address of an object
      allocated in the obstack.  Then OBJECT is freed, along with
      everything allocated in OBSTACK since OBJECT.
 
-   Note that if OBJECT is a null pointer, the result is an
-uninitialized obstack.  To free all memory in an obstack but leave it
-valid for further allocation, call `obstack_free' with the address of
-the first object allocated on the obstack:
+   Note that if OBJECT is a null pointer, the result is an uninitialized
+obstack.  To free all memory in an obstack but leave it valid for
+further allocation, call 'obstack_free' with the address of the first
+object allocated on the obstack:
 
      obstack_free (obstack_ptr, first_object_allocated_ptr);
 
@@ -7151,1564 +7119,3 @@
 other obstacks, or non-obstack allocation, can reuse the space of the
 chunk.
 
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Obstack Functions,  Next: Growing Objects,  Prev: Freeing Obstack Objects,  Up: Obstacks
-
-3.2.4.5 Obstack Functions and Macros
-....................................
-
-The interfaces for using obstacks may be defined either as functions or
-as macros, depending on the compiler.  The obstack facility works with
-all C compilers, including both ISO C and traditional C, but there are
-precautions you must take if you plan to use compilers other than GNU C.
-
-   If you are using an old-fashioned non-ISO C compiler, all the obstack
-"functions" are actually defined only as macros.  You can call these
-macros like functions, but you cannot use them in any other way (for
-example, you cannot take their address).
-
-   Calling the macros requires a special precaution: namely, the first
-operand (the obstack pointer) may not contain any side effects, because
-it may be computed more than once.  For example, if you write this:
-
-     obstack_alloc (get_obstack (), 4);
-
-you will find that `get_obstack' may be called several times.  If you
-use `*obstack_list_ptr++' as the obstack pointer argument, you will get
-very strange results since the incrementation may occur several times.
-
-   In ISO C, each function has both a macro definition and a function
-definition.  The function definition is used if you take the address of
-the function without calling it.  An ordinary call uses the macro
-definition by default, but you can request the function definition
-instead by writing the function name in parentheses, as shown here:
-
-     char *x;
-     void *(*funcp) ();
-     /* Use the macro.  */
-     x = (char *) obstack_alloc (obptr, size);
-     /* Call the function.  */
-     x = (char *) (obstack_alloc) (obptr, size);
-     /* Take the address of the function.  */
-     funcp = obstack_alloc;
-
-This is the same situation that exists in ISO C for the standard library
-functions.  *Note Macro Definitions::.
-
-   *Warning:* When you do use the macros, you must observe the
-precaution of avoiding side effects in the first operand, even in ISO C.
-
-   If you use the GNU C compiler, this precaution is not necessary,
-because various language extensions in GNU C permit defining the macros
-so as to compute each argument only once.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Growing Objects,  Next: Extra Fast Growing,  Prev: Obstack Functions,  Up: Obstacks
-
-3.2.4.6 Growing Objects
-.......................
-
-Because memory in obstack chunks is used sequentially, it is possible to
-build up an object step by step, adding one or more bytes at a time to
-the end of the object.  With this technique, you do not need to know
-how much data you will put in the object until you come to the end of
-it.  We call this the technique of "growing objects".  The special
-functions for adding data to the growing object are described in this
-section.
-
-   You don't need to do anything special when you start to grow an
-object.  Using one of the functions to add data to the object
-automatically starts it.  However, it is necessary to say explicitly
-when the object is finished.  This is done with the function
-`obstack_finish'.
-
-   The actual address of the object thus built up is not known until the
-object is finished.  Until then, it always remains possible that you
-will add so much data that the object must be copied into a new chunk.
-
-   While the obstack is in use for a growing object, you cannot use it
-for ordinary allocation of another object.  If you try to do so, the
-space already added to the growing object will become part of the other
-object.
-
- -- Function: void obstack_blank (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, int SIZE)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
-     corrupt mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     The most basic function for adding to a growing object is
-     `obstack_blank', which adds space without initializing it.
-
- -- Function: void obstack_grow (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void
-          *DATA, int SIZE)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
-     corrupt mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     To add a block of initialized space, use `obstack_grow', which is
-     the growing-object analogue of `obstack_copy'.  It adds SIZE bytes
-     of data to the growing object, copying the contents from DATA.
-
- -- Function: void obstack_grow0 (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void
-          *DATA, int SIZE)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
-     corrupt mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     This is the growing-object analogue of `obstack_copy0'.  It adds
-     SIZE bytes copied from DATA, followed by an additional null
-     character.
-
- -- Function: void obstack_1grow (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, char C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
-     corrupt mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     To add one character at a time, use the function `obstack_1grow'.
-     It adds a single byte containing C to the growing object.
-
- -- Function: void obstack_ptr_grow (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void
-          *DATA)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
-     corrupt mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Adding the value of a pointer one can use the function
-     `obstack_ptr_grow'.  It adds `sizeof (void *)' bytes containing
-     the value of DATA.
-
- -- Function: void obstack_int_grow (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, int
-          DATA)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
-     corrupt mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     A single value of type `int' can be added by using the
-     `obstack_int_grow' function.  It adds `sizeof (int)' bytes to the
-     growing object and initializes them with the value of DATA.
-
- -- Function: void * obstack_finish (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
-     corrupt | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     When you are finished growing the object, use the function
-     `obstack_finish' to close it off and return its final address.
-
-     Once you have finished the object, the obstack is available for
-     ordinary allocation or for growing another object.
-
-     This function can return a null pointer under the same conditions
-     as `obstack_alloc' (*note Allocation in an Obstack::).
-
-   When you build an object by growing it, you will probably need to
-know afterward how long it became.  You need not keep track of this as
-you grow the object, because you can find out the length from the
-obstack just before finishing the object with the function
-`obstack_object_size', declared as follows:
-
- -- Function: int obstack_object_size (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Safe |
-     *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     This function returns the current size of the growing object, in
-     bytes.  Remember to call this function _before_ finishing the
-     object.  After it is finished, `obstack_object_size' will return
-     zero.
-
-   If you have started growing an object and wish to cancel it, you
-should finish it and then free it, like this:
-
-     obstack_free (obstack_ptr, obstack_finish (obstack_ptr));
-
-This has no effect if no object was growing.
-
-   You can use `obstack_blank' with a negative size argument to make
-the current object smaller.  Just don't try to shrink it beyond zero
-length--there's no telling what will happen if you do that.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Extra Fast Growing,  Next: Status of an Obstack,  Prev: Growing Objects,  Up: Obstacks
-
-3.2.4.7 Extra Fast Growing Objects
-..................................
-
-The usual functions for growing objects incur overhead for checking
-whether there is room for the new growth in the current chunk.  If you
-are frequently constructing objects in small steps of growth, this
-overhead can be significant.
-
-   You can reduce the overhead by using special "fast growth" functions
-that grow the object without checking.  In order to have a robust
-program, you must do the checking yourself.  If you do this checking in
-the simplest way each time you are about to add data to the object, you
-have not saved anything, because that is what the ordinary growth
-functions do.  But if you can arrange to check less often, or check
-more efficiently, then you make the program faster.
-
-   The function `obstack_room' returns the amount of room available in
-the current chunk.  It is declared as follows:
-
- -- Function: int obstack_room (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Safe |
-     *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     This returns the number of bytes that can be added safely to the
-     current growing object (or to an object about to be started) in
-     obstack OBSTACK using the fast growth functions.
-
-   While you know there is room, you can use these fast growth functions
-for adding data to a growing object:
-
- -- Function: void obstack_1grow_fast (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR,
-          char C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Unsafe
-     corrupt mem | *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     The function `obstack_1grow_fast' adds one byte containing the
-     character C to the growing object in obstack OBSTACK-PTR.
-
- -- Function: void obstack_ptr_grow_fast (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR,
-          void *DATA)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Safe |
-     *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     The function `obstack_ptr_grow_fast' adds `sizeof (void *)' bytes
-     containing the value of DATA to the growing object in obstack
-     OBSTACK-PTR.
-
- -- Function: void obstack_int_grow_fast (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR,
-          int DATA)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Safe |
-     *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     The function `obstack_int_grow_fast' adds `sizeof (int)' bytes
-     containing the value of DATA to the growing object in obstack
-     OBSTACK-PTR.
-
- -- Function: void obstack_blank_fast (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, int
-          SIZE)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Safe |
-     *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     The function `obstack_blank_fast' adds SIZE bytes to the growing
-     object in obstack OBSTACK-PTR without initializing them.
-
-   When you check for space using `obstack_room' and there is not
-enough room for what you want to add, the fast growth functions are not
-safe.  In this case, simply use the corresponding ordinary growth
-function instead.  Very soon this will copy the object to a new chunk;
-then there will be lots of room available again.
-
-   So, each time you use an ordinary growth function, check afterward
-for sufficient space using `obstack_room'.  Once the object is copied
-to a new chunk, there will be plenty of space again, so the program will
-start using the fast growth functions again.
-
-   Here is an example:
-
-     void
-     add_string (struct obstack *obstack, const char *ptr, int len)
-     {
-       while (len > 0)
-         {
-           int room = obstack_room (obstack);
-           if (room == 0)
-             {
-               /* Not enough room. Add one character slowly,
-                  which may copy to a new chunk and make room.  */
-               obstack_1grow (obstack, *ptr++);
-               len--;
-             }
-           else
-             {
-               if (room > len)
-                 room = len;
-               /* Add fast as much as we have room for. */
-               len -= room;
-               while (room-- > 0)
-                 obstack_1grow_fast (obstack, *ptr++);
-             }
-         }
-     }
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Status of an Obstack,  Next: Obstacks Data Alignment,  Prev: Extra Fast Growing,  Up: Obstacks
-
-3.2.4.8 Status of an Obstack
-............................
-
-Here are functions that provide information on the current status of
-allocation in an obstack.  You can use them to learn about an object
-while still growing it.
-
- -- Function: void * obstack_base (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe corrupt | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     This function returns the tentative address of the beginning of the
-     currently growing object in OBSTACK-PTR.  If you finish the object
-     immediately, it will have that address.  If you make it larger
-     first, it may outgrow the current chunk--then its address will
-     change!
-
-     If no object is growing, this value says where the next object you
-     allocate will start (once again assuming it fits in the current
-     chunk).
-
- -- Function: void * obstack_next_free (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Unsafe corrupt | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     This function returns the address of the first free byte in the
-     current chunk of obstack OBSTACK-PTR.  This is the end of the
-     currently growing object.  If no object is growing,
-     `obstack_next_free' returns the same value as `obstack_base'.
-
- -- Function: int obstack_object_size (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe race:obstack-ptr | AS-Safe | AC-Safe |
-     *Note POSIX Safety Concepts::.
-
-     This function returns the size in bytes of the currently growing
-     object.  This is equivalent to
-
-          obstack_next_free (OBSTACK-PTR) - obstack_base (OBSTACK-PTR)
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Obstacks Data Alignment,  Next: Obstack Chunks,  Prev: Status of an Obstack,  Up: Obstacks
-
-3.2.4.9 Alignment of Data in Obstacks
-.....................................
-
-Each obstack has an "alignment boundary"; each object allocated in the
-obstack automatically starts on an address that is a multiple of the
-specified boundary.  By default, this boundary is aligned so that the
-object can hold any type of data.
-
-   To access an obstack's alignment boundary, use the macro
-`obstack_alignment_mask', whose function prototype looks like this:
-
- -- Macro: int obstack_alignment_mask (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     The value is a bit mask; a bit that is 1 indicates that the
-     corresponding bit in the address of an object should be 0.  The
-     mask value should be one less than a power of 2; the effect is
-     that all object addresses are multiples of that power of 2.  The
-     default value of the mask is a value that allows aligned objects
-     to hold any type of data: for example, if its value is 3, any type
-     of data can be stored at locations whose addresses are multiples
-     of 4.  A mask value of 0 means an object can start on any multiple
-     of 1 (that is, no alignment is required).
-
-     The expansion of the macro `obstack_alignment_mask' is an lvalue,
-     so you can alter the mask by assignment.  For example, this
-     statement:
-
-          obstack_alignment_mask (obstack_ptr) = 0;
-
-     has the effect of turning off alignment processing in the
-     specified obstack.
-
-   Note that a change in alignment mask does not take effect until
-_after_ the next time an object is allocated or finished in the
-obstack.  If you are not growing an object, you can make the new
-alignment mask take effect immediately by calling `obstack_finish'.
-This will finish a zero-length object and then do proper alignment for
-the next object.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Obstack Chunks,  Next: Summary of Obstacks,  Prev: Obstacks Data Alignment,  Up: Obstacks
-
-3.2.4.10 Obstack Chunks
-.......................
-
-Obstacks work by allocating space for themselves in large chunks, and
-then parceling out space in the chunks to satisfy your requests.  Chunks
-are normally 4096 bytes long unless you specify a different chunk size.
-The chunk size includes 8 bytes of overhead that are not actually used
-for storing objects.  Regardless of the specified size, longer chunks
-will be allocated when necessary for long objects.
-
-   The obstack library allocates chunks by calling the function
-`obstack_chunk_alloc', which you must define.  When a chunk is no
-longer needed because you have freed all the objects in it, the obstack
-library frees the chunk by calling `obstack_chunk_free', which you must
-also define.
-
-   These two must be defined (as macros) or declared (as functions) in
-each source file that uses `obstack_init' (*note Creating Obstacks::).
-Most often they are defined as macros like this:
-
-     #define obstack_chunk_alloc malloc
-     #define obstack_chunk_free free
-
-   Note that these are simple macros (no arguments).  Macro definitions
-with arguments will not work!  It is necessary that
-`obstack_chunk_alloc' or `obstack_chunk_free', alone, expand into a
-function name if it is not itself a function name.
-
-   If you allocate chunks with `malloc', the chunk size should be a
-power of 2.  The default chunk size, 4096, was chosen because it is long
-enough to satisfy many typical requests on the obstack yet short enough
-not to waste too much memory in the portion of the last chunk not yet
-used.
-
- -- Macro: int obstack_chunk_size (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     This returns the chunk size of the given obstack.
-
-   Since this macro expands to an lvalue, you can specify a new chunk
-size by assigning it a new value.  Doing so does not affect the chunks
-already allocated, but will change the size of chunks allocated for
-that particular obstack in the future.  It is unlikely to be useful to
-make the chunk size smaller, but making it larger might improve
-efficiency if you are allocating many objects whose size is comparable
-to the chunk size.  Here is how to do so cleanly:
-
-     if (obstack_chunk_size (obstack_ptr) < NEW-CHUNK-SIZE)
-       obstack_chunk_size (obstack_ptr) = NEW-CHUNK-SIZE;
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Summary of Obstacks,  Prev: Obstack Chunks,  Up: Obstacks
-
-3.2.4.11 Summary of Obstack Functions
-.....................................
-
-Here is a summary of all the functions associated with obstacks.  Each
-takes the address of an obstack (`struct obstack *') as its first
-argument.
-
-`void obstack_init (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)'
-     Initialize use of an obstack.  *Note Creating Obstacks::.
-
-`void *obstack_alloc (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, int SIZE)'
-     Allocate an object of SIZE uninitialized bytes.  *Note Allocation
-     in an Obstack::.
-
-`void *obstack_copy (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void *ADDRESS, int SIZE)'
-     Allocate an object of SIZE bytes, with contents copied from
-     ADDRESS.  *Note Allocation in an Obstack::.
-
-`void *obstack_copy0 (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void *ADDRESS, int SIZE)'
-     Allocate an object of SIZE+1 bytes, with SIZE of them copied from
-     ADDRESS, followed by a null character at the end.  *Note
-     Allocation in an Obstack::.
-
-`void obstack_free (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void *OBJECT)'
-     Free OBJECT (and everything allocated in the specified obstack
-     more recently than OBJECT).  *Note Freeing Obstack Objects::.
-
-`void obstack_blank (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, int SIZE)'
-     Add SIZE uninitialized bytes to a growing object.  *Note Growing
-     Objects::.
-
-`void obstack_grow (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void *ADDRESS, int SIZE)'
-     Add SIZE bytes, copied from ADDRESS, to a growing object.  *Note
-     Growing Objects::.
-
-`void obstack_grow0 (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, void *ADDRESS, int SIZE)'
-     Add SIZE bytes, copied from ADDRESS, to a growing object, and then
-     add another byte containing a null character.  *Note Growing
-     Objects::.
-
-`void obstack_1grow (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, char DATA-CHAR)'
-     Add one byte containing DATA-CHAR to a growing object.  *Note
-     Growing Objects::.
-
-`void *obstack_finish (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)'
-     Finalize the object that is growing and return its permanent
-     address.  *Note Growing Objects::.
-
-`int obstack_object_size (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)'
-     Get the current size of the currently growing object.  *Note
-     Growing Objects::.
-
-`void obstack_blank_fast (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, int SIZE)'
-     Add SIZE uninitialized bytes to a growing object without checking
-     that there is enough room.  *Note Extra Fast Growing::.
-
-`void obstack_1grow_fast (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR, char DATA-CHAR)'
-     Add one byte containing DATA-CHAR to a growing object without
-     checking that there is enough room.  *Note Extra Fast Growing::.
-
-`int obstack_room (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)'
-     Get the amount of room now available for growing the current
-     object.  *Note Extra Fast Growing::.
-
-`int obstack_alignment_mask (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)'
-     The mask used for aligning the beginning of an object.  This is an
-     lvalue.  *Note Obstacks Data Alignment::.
-
-`int obstack_chunk_size (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)'
-     The size for allocating chunks.  This is an lvalue.  *Note Obstack
-     Chunks::.
-
-`void *obstack_base (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)'
-     Tentative starting address of the currently growing object.  *Note
-     Status of an Obstack::.
-
-`void *obstack_next_free (struct obstack *OBSTACK-PTR)'
-     Address just after the end of the currently growing object.  *Note
-     Status of an Obstack::.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Variable Size Automatic,  Prev: Obstacks,  Up: Memory Allocation
-
-3.2.5 Automatic Storage with Variable Size
-------------------------------------------
-
-The function `alloca' supports a kind of half-dynamic allocation in
-which blocks are allocated dynamically but freed automatically.
-
-   Allocating a block with `alloca' is an explicit action; you can
-allocate as many blocks as you wish, and compute the size at run time.
-But all the blocks are freed when you exit the function that `alloca'
-was called from, just as if they were automatic variables declared in
-that function.  There is no way to free the space explicitly.
-
-   The prototype for `alloca' is in `stdlib.h'.  This function is a BSD
-extension.  
-
- -- Function: void * alloca (size_t SIZE)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     The return value of `alloca' is the address of a block of SIZE
-     bytes of memory, allocated in the stack frame of the calling
-     function.
-
-   Do not use `alloca' inside the arguments of a function call--you
-will get unpredictable results, because the stack space for the
-`alloca' would appear on the stack in the middle of the space for the
-function arguments.  An example of what to avoid is `foo (x, alloca
-(4), y)'.
-
-* Menu:
-
-* Alloca Example::              Example of using `alloca'.
-* Advantages of Alloca::        Reasons to use `alloca'.
-* Disadvantages of Alloca::     Reasons to avoid `alloca'.
-* GNU C Variable-Size Arrays::  Only in GNU C, here is an alternative
-				 method of allocating dynamically and
-				 freeing automatically.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Alloca Example,  Next: Advantages of Alloca,  Up: Variable Size Automatic
-
-3.2.5.1 `alloca' Example
-........................
-
-As an example of the use of `alloca', here is a function that opens a
-file name made from concatenating two argument strings, and returns a
-file descriptor or minus one signifying failure:
-
-     int
-     open2 (char *str1, char *str2, int flags, int mode)
-     {
-       char *name = (char *) alloca (strlen (str1) + strlen (str2) + 1);
-       stpcpy (stpcpy (name, str1), str2);
-       return open (name, flags, mode);
-     }
-
-Here is how you would get the same results with `malloc' and `free':
-
-     int
-     open2 (char *str1, char *str2, int flags, int mode)
-     {
-       char *name = (char *) malloc (strlen (str1) + strlen (str2) + 1);
-       int desc;
-       if (name == 0)
-         fatal ("virtual memory exceeded");
-       stpcpy (stpcpy (name, str1), str2);
-       desc = open (name, flags, mode);
-       free (name);
-       return desc;
-     }
-
-   As you can see, it is simpler with `alloca'.  But `alloca' has
-other, more important advantages, and some disadvantages.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Advantages of Alloca,  Next: Disadvantages of Alloca,  Prev: Alloca Example,  Up: Variable Size Automatic
-
-3.2.5.2 Advantages of `alloca'
-..............................
-
-Here are the reasons why `alloca' may be preferable to `malloc':
-
-   * Using `alloca' wastes very little space and is very fast.  (It is
-     open-coded by the GNU C compiler.)
-
-   * Since `alloca' does not have separate pools for different sizes of
-     block, space used for any size block can be reused for any other
-     size.  `alloca' does not cause memory fragmentation.
-
-   * Nonlocal exits done with `longjmp' (*note Non-Local Exits::)
-     automatically free the space allocated with `alloca' when they exit
-     through the function that called `alloca'.  This is the most
-     important reason to use `alloca'.
-
-     To illustrate this, suppose you have a function
-     `open_or_report_error' which returns a descriptor, like `open', if
-     it succeeds, but does not return to its caller if it fails.  If
-     the file cannot be opened, it prints an error message and jumps
-     out to the command level of your program using `longjmp'.  Let's
-     change `open2' (*note Alloca Example::) to use this subroutine:
-
-          int
-          open2 (char *str1, char *str2, int flags, int mode)
-          {
-            char *name = (char *) alloca (strlen (str1) + strlen (str2) + 1);
-            stpcpy (stpcpy (name, str1), str2);
-            return open_or_report_error (name, flags, mode);
-          }
-
-     Because of the way `alloca' works, the memory it allocates is
-     freed even when an error occurs, with no special effort required.
-
-     By contrast, the previous definition of `open2' (which uses
-     `malloc' and `free') would develop a memory leak if it were
-     changed in this way.  Even if you are willing to make more changes
-     to fix it, there is no easy way to do so.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Disadvantages of Alloca,  Next: GNU C Variable-Size Arrays,  Prev: Advantages of Alloca,  Up: Variable Size Automatic
-
-3.2.5.3 Disadvantages of `alloca'
-.................................
-
-These are the disadvantages of `alloca' in comparison with `malloc':
-
-   * If you try to allocate more memory than the machine can provide,
-     you don't get a clean error message.  Instead you get a fatal
-     signal like the one you would get from an infinite recursion;
-     probably a segmentation violation (*note Program Error Signals::).
-
-   * Some non-GNU systems fail to support `alloca', so it is less
-     portable.  However, a slower emulation of `alloca' written in C is
-     available for use on systems with this deficiency.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: GNU C Variable-Size Arrays,  Prev: Disadvantages of Alloca,  Up: Variable Size Automatic
-
-3.2.5.4 GNU C Variable-Size Arrays
-..................................
-
-In GNU C, you can replace most uses of `alloca' with an array of
-variable size.  Here is how `open2' would look then:
-
-     int open2 (char *str1, char *str2, int flags, int mode)
-     {
-       char name[strlen (str1) + strlen (str2) + 1];
-       stpcpy (stpcpy (name, str1), str2);
-       return open (name, flags, mode);
-     }
-
-   But `alloca' is not always equivalent to a variable-sized array, for
-several reasons:
-
-   * A variable size array's space is freed at the end of the scope of
-     the name of the array.  The space allocated with `alloca' remains
-     until the end of the function.
-
-   * It is possible to use `alloca' within a loop, allocating an
-     additional block on each iteration.  This is impossible with
-     variable-sized arrays.
-
-   *NB:* If you mix use of `alloca' and variable-sized arrays within
-one function, exiting a scope in which a variable-sized array was
-declared frees all blocks allocated with `alloca' during the execution
-of that scope.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Resizing the Data Segment,  Next: Locking Pages,  Prev: Memory Allocation,  Up: Memory
-
-3.3 Resizing the Data Segment
-=============================
-
-The symbols in this section are declared in `unistd.h'.
-
-   You will not normally use the functions in this section, because the
-functions described in *note Memory Allocation:: are easier to use.
-Those are interfaces to a GNU C Library memory allocator that uses the
-functions below itself.  The functions below are simple interfaces to
-system calls.
-
- -- Function: int brk (void *ADDR)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     `brk' sets the high end of the calling process' data segment to
-     ADDR.
-
-     The address of the end of a segment is defined to be the address
-     of the last byte in the segment plus 1.
-
-     The function has no effect if ADDR is lower than the low end of
-     the data segment.  (This is considered success, by the way).
-
-     The function fails if it would cause the data segment to overlap
-     another segment or exceed the process' data storage limit (*note
-     Limits on Resources::).
-
-     The function is named for a common historical case where data
-     storage and the stack are in the same segment.  Data storage
-     allocation grows upward from the bottom of the segment while the
-     stack grows downward toward it from the top of the segment and the
-     curtain between them is called the "break".
-
-     The return value is zero on success.  On failure, the return value
-     is `-1' and `errno' is set accordingly.  The following `errno'
-     values are specific to this function:
-
-    `ENOMEM'
-          The request would cause the data segment to overlap another
-          segment or exceed the process' data storage limit.
-
-
- -- Function: void *sbrk (ptrdiff_t DELTA)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     This function is the same as `brk' except that you specify the new
-     end of the data segment as an offset DELTA from the current end
-     and on success the return value is the address of the resulting
-     end of the data segment instead of zero.
-
-     This means you can use `sbrk(0)' to find out what the current end
-     of the data segment is.
-
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Locking Pages,  Prev: Resizing the Data Segment,  Up: Memory
-
-3.4 Locking Pages
-=================
-
-You can tell the system to associate a particular virtual memory page
-with a real page frame and keep it that way -- i.e., cause the page to
-be paged in if it isn't already and mark it so it will never be paged
-out and consequently will never cause a page fault.  This is called
-"locking" a page.
-
-   The functions in this chapter lock and unlock the calling process'
-pages.
-
-* Menu:
-
-* Why Lock Pages::                Reasons to read this section.
-* Locked Memory Details::         Everything you need to know locked
-                                    memory
-* Page Lock Functions::           Here's how to do it.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Why Lock Pages,  Next: Locked Memory Details,  Up: Locking Pages
-
-3.4.1 Why Lock Pages
---------------------
-
-Because page faults cause paged out pages to be paged in transparently,
-a process rarely needs to be concerned about locking pages.  However,
-there are two reasons people sometimes are:
-
-   * Speed.  A page fault is transparent only insofar as the process is
-     not sensitive to how long it takes to do a simple memory access.
-     Time-critical processes, especially realtime processes, may not be
-     able to wait or may not be able to tolerate variance in execution
-     speed.  
-
-     A process that needs to lock pages for this reason probably also
-     needs priority among other processes for use of the CPU.  *Note
-     Priority::.
-
-     In some cases, the programmer knows better than the system's demand
-     paging allocator which pages should remain in real memory to
-     optimize system performance.  In this case, locking pages can help.
-
-   * Privacy.  If you keep secrets in virtual memory and that virtual
-     memory gets paged out, that increases the chance that the secrets
-     will get out.  If a password gets written out to disk swap space,
-     for example, it might still be there long after virtual and real
-     memory have been wiped clean.
-
-
-   Be aware that when you lock a page, that's one fewer page frame that
-can be used to back other virtual memory (by the same or other
-processes), which can mean more page faults, which means the system
-runs more slowly.  In fact, if you lock enough memory, some programs
-may not be able to run at all for lack of real memory.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Locked Memory Details,  Next: Page Lock Functions,  Prev: Why Lock Pages,  Up: Locking Pages
-
-3.4.2 Locked Memory Details
----------------------------
-
-A memory lock is associated with a virtual page, not a real frame.  The
-paging rule is: If a frame backs at least one locked page, don't page it
-out.
-
-   Memory locks do not stack.  I.e., you can't lock a particular page
-twice so that it has to be unlocked twice before it is truly unlocked.
-It is either locked or it isn't.
-
-   A memory lock persists until the process that owns the memory
-explicitly unlocks it.  (But process termination and exec cause the
-virtual memory to cease to exist, which you might say means it isn't
-locked any more).
-
-   Memory locks are not inherited by child processes.  (But note that
-on a modern Unix system, immediately after a fork, the parent's and the
-child's virtual address space are backed by the same real page frames,
-so the child enjoys the parent's locks).  *Note Creating a Process::.
-
-   Because of its ability to impact other processes, only the superuser
-can lock a page.  Any process can unlock its own page.
-
-   The system sets limits on the amount of memory a process can have
-locked and the amount of real memory it can have dedicated to it.
-*Note Limits on Resources::.
-
-   In Linux, locked pages aren't as locked as you might think.  Two
-virtual pages that are not shared memory can nonetheless be backed by
-the same real frame.  The kernel does this in the name of efficiency
-when it knows both virtual pages contain identical data, and does it
-even if one or both of the virtual pages are locked.
-
-   But when a process modifies one of those pages, the kernel must get
-it a separate frame and fill it with the page's data.  This is known as
-a "copy-on-write page fault".  It takes a small amount of time and in a
-pathological case, getting that frame may require I/O.  
-
-   To make sure this doesn't happen to your program, don't just lock the
-pages.  Write to them as well, unless you know you won't write to them
-ever.  And to make sure you have pre-allocated frames for your stack,
-enter a scope that declares a C automatic variable larger than the
-maximum stack size you will need, set it to something, then return from
-its scope.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Page Lock Functions,  Prev: Locked Memory Details,  Up: Locking Pages
-
-3.4.3 Functions To Lock And Unlock Pages
-----------------------------------------
-
-The symbols in this section are declared in `sys/mman.h'.  These
-functions are defined by POSIX.1b, but their availability depends on
-your kernel.  If your kernel doesn't allow these functions, they exist
-but always fail.  They _are_ available with a Linux kernel.
-
-   *Portability Note:* POSIX.1b requires that when the `mlock' and
-`munlock' functions are available, the file `unistd.h' define the macro
-`_POSIX_MEMLOCK_RANGE' and the file `limits.h' define the macro
-`PAGESIZE' to be the size of a memory page in bytes.  It requires that
-when the `mlockall' and `munlockall' functions are available, the
-`unistd.h' file define the macro `_POSIX_MEMLOCK'.  The GNU C Library
-conforms to this requirement.
-
- -- Function: int mlock (const void *ADDR, size_t LEN)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     `mlock' locks a range of the calling process' virtual pages.
-
-     The range of memory starts at address ADDR and is LEN bytes long.
-     Actually, since you must lock whole pages, it is the range of
-     pages that include any part of the specified range.
-
-     When the function returns successfully, each of those pages is
-     backed by (connected to) a real frame (is resident) and is marked
-     to stay that way.  This means the function may cause page-ins and
-     have to wait for them.
-
-     When the function fails, it does not affect the lock status of any
-     pages.
-
-     The return value is zero if the function succeeds.  Otherwise, it
-     is `-1' and `errno' is set accordingly.  `errno' values specific
-     to this function are:
-
-    `ENOMEM'
-             * At least some of the specified address range does not
-               exist in the calling process' virtual address space.
-
-             * The locking would cause the process to exceed its locked
-               page limit.
-
-    `EPERM'
-          The calling process is not superuser.
-
-    `EINVAL'
-          LEN is not positive.
-
-    `ENOSYS'
-          The kernel does not provide `mlock' capability.
-
-
-     You can lock _all_ a process' memory with `mlockall'.  You unlock
-     memory with `munlock' or `munlockall'.
-
-     To avoid all page faults in a C program, you have to use
-     `mlockall', because some of the memory a program uses is hidden
-     from the C code, e.g. the stack and automatic variables, and you
-     wouldn't know what address to tell `mlock'.
-
-
- -- Function: int munlock (const void *ADDR, size_t LEN)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     `munlock' unlocks a range of the calling process' virtual pages.
-
-     `munlock' is the inverse of `mlock' and functions completely
-     analogously to `mlock', except that there is no `EPERM' failure.
-
-
- -- Function: int mlockall (int FLAGS)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     `mlockall' locks all the pages in a process' virtual memory address
-     space, and/or any that are added to it in the future.  This
-     includes the pages of the code, data and stack segment, as well as
-     shared libraries, user space kernel data, shared memory, and
-     memory mapped files.
-
-     FLAGS is a string of single bit flags represented by the following
-     macros.  They tell `mlockall' which of its functions you want.  All
-     other bits must be zero.
-
-    `MCL_CURRENT'
-          Lock all pages which currently exist in the calling process'
-          virtual address space.
-
-    `MCL_FUTURE'
-          Set a mode such that any pages added to the process' virtual
-          address space in the future will be locked from birth.  This
-          mode does not affect future address spaces owned by the same
-          process so exec, which replaces a process' address space,
-          wipes out `MCL_FUTURE'.  *Note Executing a File::.
-
-
-     When the function returns successfully, and you specified
-     `MCL_CURRENT', all of the process' pages are backed by (connected
-     to) real frames (they are resident) and are marked to stay that
-     way.  This means the function may cause page-ins and have to wait
-     for them.
-
-     When the process is in `MCL_FUTURE' mode because it successfully
-     executed this function and specified `MCL_CURRENT', any system call
-     by the process that requires space be added to its virtual address
-     space fails with `errno' = `ENOMEM' if locking the additional space
-     would cause the process to exceed its locked page limit.  In the
-     case that the address space addition that can't be accommodated is
-     stack expansion, the stack expansion fails and the kernel sends a
-     `SIGSEGV' signal to the process.
-
-     When the function fails, it does not affect the lock status of any
-     pages or the future locking mode.
-
-     The return value is zero if the function succeeds.  Otherwise, it
-     is `-1' and `errno' is set accordingly.  `errno' values specific
-     to this function are:
-
-    `ENOMEM'
-             * At least some of the specified address range does not
-               exist in the calling process' virtual address space.
-
-             * The locking would cause the process to exceed its locked
-               page limit.
-
-    `EPERM'
-          The calling process is not superuser.
-
-    `EINVAL'
-          Undefined bits in FLAGS are not zero.
-
-    `ENOSYS'
-          The kernel does not provide `mlockall' capability.
-
-
-     You can lock just specific pages with `mlock'.  You unlock pages
-     with `munlockall' and `munlock'.
-
-
- -- Function: int munlockall (void)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     `munlockall' unlocks every page in the calling process' virtual
-     address space and turn off `MCL_FUTURE' future locking mode.
-
-     The return value is zero if the function succeeds.  Otherwise, it
-     is `-1' and `errno' is set accordingly.  The only way this
-     function can fail is for generic reasons that all functions and
-     system calls can fail, so there are no specific `errno' values.
-
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Character Handling,  Next: String and Array Utilities,  Prev: Memory,  Up: Top
-
-4 Character Handling
-********************
-
-Programs that work with characters and strings often need to classify a
-character--is it alphabetic, is it a digit, is it whitespace, and so
-on--and perform case conversion operations on characters.  The
-functions in the header file `ctype.h' are provided for this purpose.  
-
-   Since the choice of locale and character set can alter the
-classifications of particular character codes, all of these functions
-are affected by the current locale.  (More precisely, they are affected
-by the locale currently selected for character classification--the
-`LC_CTYPE' category; see *note Locale Categories::.)
-
-   The ISO C standard specifies two different sets of functions.  The
-one set works on `char' type characters, the other one on `wchar_t'
-wide characters (*note Extended Char Intro::).
-
-* Menu:
-
-* Classification of Characters::       Testing whether characters are
-			                letters, digits, punctuation, etc.
-
-* Case Conversion::                    Case mapping, and the like.
-* Classification of Wide Characters::  Character class determination for
-                                        wide characters.
-* Using Wide Char Classes::            Notes on using the wide character
-                                        classes.
-* Wide Character Case Conversion::     Mapping of wide characters.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Classification of Characters,  Next: Case Conversion,  Up: Character Handling
-
-4.1 Classification of Characters
-================================
-
-This section explains the library functions for classifying characters.
-For example, `isalpha' is the function to test for an alphabetic
-character.  It takes one argument, the character to test, and returns a
-nonzero integer if the character is alphabetic, and zero otherwise.  You
-would use it like this:
-
-     if (isalpha (c))
-       printf ("The character `%c' is alphabetic.\n", c);
-
-   Each of the functions in this section tests for membership in a
-particular class of characters; each has a name starting with `is'.
-Each of them takes one argument, which is a character to test, and
-returns an `int' which is treated as a boolean value.  The character
-argument is passed as an `int', and it may be the constant value `EOF'
-instead of a real character.
-
-   The attributes of any given character can vary between locales.
-*Note Locales::, for more information on locales.
-
-   These functions are declared in the header file `ctype.h'.  
-
- -- Function: int islower (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a lower-case letter.  The letter need not be
-     from the Latin alphabet, any alphabet representable is valid.
-
- -- Function: int isupper (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is an upper-case letter.  The letter need not be
-     from the Latin alphabet, any alphabet representable is valid.
-
- -- Function: int isalpha (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is an alphabetic character (a letter).  If
-     `islower' or `isupper' is true of a character, then `isalpha' is
-     also true.
-
-     In some locales, there may be additional characters for which
-     `isalpha' is true--letters which are neither upper case nor lower
-     case.  But in the standard `"C"' locale, there are no such
-     additional characters.
-
- -- Function: int isdigit (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a decimal digit (`0' through `9').
-
- -- Function: int isalnum (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is an alphanumeric character (a letter or
-     number); in other words, if either `isalpha' or `isdigit' is true
-     of a character, then `isalnum' is also true.
-
- -- Function: int isxdigit (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a hexadecimal digit.  Hexadecimal digits
-     include the normal decimal digits `0' through `9' and the letters
-     `A' through `F' and `a' through `f'.
-
- -- Function: int ispunct (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a punctuation character.  This means any
-     printing character that is not alphanumeric or a space character.
-
- -- Function: int isspace (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a "whitespace" character.  In the standard
-     `"C"' locale, `isspace' returns true for only the standard
-     whitespace characters:
-
-    `' ''
-          space
-
-    `'\f''
-          formfeed
-
-    `'\n''
-          newline
-
-    `'\r''
-          carriage return
-
-    `'\t''
-          horizontal tab
-
-    `'\v''
-          vertical tab
-
- -- Function: int isblank (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a blank character; that is, a space or a tab.
-     This function was originally a GNU extension, but was added in
-     ISO C99.
-
- -- Function: int isgraph (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a graphic character; that is, a character
-     that has a glyph associated with it.  The whitespace characters
-     are not considered graphic.
-
- -- Function: int isprint (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a printing character.  Printing characters
-     include all the graphic characters, plus the space (` ') character.
-
- -- Function: int iscntrl (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a control character (that is, a character that
-     is not a printing character).
-
- -- Function: int isascii (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if C is a 7-bit `unsigned char' value that fits into
-     the US/UK ASCII character set.  This function is a BSD extension
-     and is also an SVID extension.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Case Conversion,  Next: Classification of Wide Characters,  Prev: Classification of Characters,  Up: Character Handling
-
-4.2 Case Conversion
-===================
-
-This section explains the library functions for performing conversions
-such as case mappings on characters.  For example, `toupper' converts
-any character to upper case if possible.  If the character can't be
-converted, `toupper' returns it unchanged.
-
-   These functions take one argument of type `int', which is the
-character to convert, and return the converted character as an `int'.
-If the conversion is not applicable to the argument given, the argument
-is returned unchanged.
-
-   *Compatibility Note:* In pre-ISO C dialects, instead of returning
-the argument unchanged, these functions may fail when the argument is
-not suitable for the conversion.  Thus for portability, you may need to
-write `islower(c) ? toupper(c) : c' rather than just `toupper(c)'.
-
-   These functions are declared in the header file `ctype.h'.  
-
- -- Function: int tolower (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     If C is an upper-case letter, `tolower' returns the corresponding
-     lower-case letter.  If C is not an upper-case letter, C is
-     returned unchanged.
-
- -- Function: int toupper (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     If C is a lower-case letter, `toupper' returns the corresponding
-     upper-case letter.  Otherwise C is returned unchanged.
-
- -- Function: int toascii (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     This function converts C to a 7-bit `unsigned char' value that
-     fits into the US/UK ASCII character set, by clearing the high-order
-     bits.  This function is a BSD extension and is also an SVID
-     extension.
-
- -- Function: int _tolower (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     This is identical to `tolower', and is provided for compatibility
-     with the SVID.  *Note SVID::.
-
- -- Function: int _toupper (int C)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     This is identical to `toupper', and is provided for compatibility
-     with the SVID.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Classification of Wide Characters,  Next: Using Wide Char Classes,  Prev: Case Conversion,  Up: Character Handling
-
-4.3 Character class determination for wide characters
-=====================================================
-
-Amendment 1 to ISO C90 defines functions to classify wide characters.
-Although the original ISO C90 standard already defined the type
-`wchar_t', no functions operating on them were defined.
-
-   The general design of the classification functions for wide
-characters is more general.  It allows extensions to the set of
-available classifications, beyond those which are always available.
-The POSIX standard specifies how extensions can be made, and this is
-already implemented in the GNU C Library implementation of the
-`localedef' program.
-
-   The character class functions are normally implemented with bitsets,
-with a bitset per character.  For a given character, the appropriate
-bitset is read from a table and a test is performed as to whether a
-certain bit is set.  Which bit is tested for is determined by the class.
-
-   For the wide character classification functions this is made visible.
-There is a type classification type defined, a function to retrieve this
-value for a given class, and a function to test whether a given
-character is in this class, using the classification value.  On top of
-this the normal character classification functions as used for `char'
-objects can be defined.
-
- -- Data type: wctype_t
-     The `wctype_t' can hold a value which represents a character class.
-     The only defined way to generate such a value is by using the
-     `wctype' function.
-
-     This type is defined in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: wctype_t wctype (const char *PROPERTY)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     The `wctype' returns a value representing a class of wide
-     characters which is identified by the string PROPERTY.  Beside
-     some standard properties each locale can define its own ones.  In
-     case no property with the given name is known for the current
-     locale selected for the `LC_CTYPE' category, the function returns
-     zero.
-
-     The properties known in every locale are:
-
-     `"alnum"'         `"alpha"'         `"cntrl"'         `"digit"'
-     `"graph"'         `"lower"'         `"print"'         `"punct"'
-     `"space"'         `"upper"'         `"xdigit"'        
-
-     This function is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
-   To test the membership of a character to one of the non-standard
-classes the ISO C standard defines a completely new function.
-
- -- Function: int iswctype (wint_t WC, wctype_t DESC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX Safety
-     Concepts::.
-
-     This function returns a nonzero value if WC is in the character
-     class specified by DESC.  DESC must previously be returned by a
-     successful call to `wctype'.
-
-     This function is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
-   To make it easier to use the commonly-used classification functions,
-they are defined in the C library.  There is no need to use `wctype' if
-the property string is one of the known character classes.  In some
-situations it is desirable to construct the property strings, and then
-it is important that `wctype' can also handle the standard classes.
-
- -- Function: int iswalnum (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     This function returns a nonzero value if WC is an alphanumeric
-     character (a letter or number); in other words, if either
-     `iswalpha' or `iswdigit' is true of a character, then `iswalnum'
-     is also true.
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("alnum"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswalpha (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is an alphabetic character (a letter).  If
-     `iswlower' or `iswupper' is true of a character, then `iswalpha'
-     is also true.
-
-     In some locales, there may be additional characters for which
-     `iswalpha' is true--letters which are neither upper case nor lower
-     case.  But in the standard `"C"' locale, there are no such
-     additional characters.
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("alpha"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswcntrl (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is a control character (that is, a character
-     that is not a printing character).
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("cntrl"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswdigit (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is a digit (e.g., `0' through `9').  Please
-     note that this function does not only return a nonzero value for
-     _decimal_ digits, but for all kinds of digits.  A consequence is
-     that code like the following will *not* work unconditionally for
-     wide characters:
-
-          n = 0;
-          while (iswdigit (*wc))
-            {
-              n *= 10;
-              n += *wc++ - L'0';
-            }
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("digit"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswgraph (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is a graphic character; that is, a character
-     that has a glyph associated with it.  The whitespace characters
-     are not considered graphic.
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("graph"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswlower (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is a lower-case letter.  The letter need not be
-     from the Latin alphabet, any alphabet representable is valid.
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("lower"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswprint (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is a printing character.  Printing characters
-     include all the graphic characters, plus the space (` ') character.
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("print"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswpunct (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is a punctuation character.  This means any
-     printing character that is not alphanumeric or a space character.
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("punct"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswspace (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is a "whitespace" character.  In the standard
-     `"C"' locale, `iswspace' returns true for only the standard
-     whitespace characters:
-
-    `L' ''
-          space
-
-    `L'\f''
-          formfeed
-
-    `L'\n''
-          newline
-
-    `L'\r''
-          carriage return
-
-    `L'\t''
-          horizontal tab
-
-    `L'\v''
-          vertical tab
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("space"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswupper (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is an upper-case letter.  The letter need not be
-     from the Latin alphabet, any alphabet representable is valid.
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("upper"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
- -- Function: int iswxdigit (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is a hexadecimal digit.  Hexadecimal digits
-     include the normal decimal digits `0' through `9' and the letters
-     `A' through `F' and `a' through `f'.
-
-     This function can be implemented using
-
-          iswctype (wc, wctype ("xdigit"))
-
-     It is declared in `wctype.h'.
-
-   The GNU C Library also provides a function which is not defined in
-the ISO C standard but which is available as a version for single byte
-characters as well.
-
- -- Function: int iswblank (wint_t WC)
-     Preliminary: | MT-Safe locale | AS-Safe | AC-Safe | *Note POSIX
-     Safety Concepts::.
-
-     Returns true if WC is a blank character; that is, a space or a tab.
-     This function was originally a GNU extension, but was added in
-     ISO C99.  It is declared in `wchar.h'.
-
-
-File: libc.info,  Node: Using Wide Char Classes,  Next: Wide Character Case Conversion,  Prev: Classification of Wide Characters,  Up: Character Handling
-
-4.4 Notes on using the wide character classes
-=============================================
-
-The first note is probably not astonishing but still occasionally a
-cause of problems.  The `iswXXX' functions can be implemented using
-macros and in fact, the GNU C Library does this.  They are still
-available as real functions but when the `wctype.h' header is included
-the macros will be used.  This is the same as the `char' type versions
-of these functions.
-
-   The second note covers something new.  It can be best illustrated by
-a (real-world) example.  The first piece of code is an excerpt from the
-original code.  It is truncated a bit but the intention should be clear.
-
-     int
-     is_in_class (int c, const char *class)
-     {
-       if (strcmp (class, "alnum") == 0)
-         return isalnum (c);
-       if (strcmp (class, "alpha") == 0)
-         return isalpha (c);
-       if (strcmp (class, "cntrl") == 0)
-         return iscntrl (c);
-       ...
-       return 0;
-     }
-
-   Now, with the `wctype' and `iswctype' you can avoid the `if'
-cascades, but rewriting the code as follows is wrong:
-
-     int
-     is_in_class (int c, const char *class)
-     {
-       wctype_t desc = wctype (class);
-       return desc ? iswctype ((wint_t) c, desc) : 0;
-     }
-
-   The problem is that it is not guaranteed that the wide character
-representation of a single-byte character can be found using casting.
-In fact, usually this fails miserably.  The correct solution to this
-problem is to write the code as follows:
-
-     int
-     is_in_class (int c, const char *class)
-     {
-       wctype_t desc = wctype (class);
-       return desc ? iswctype (btowc (c), desc) : 0;
-     }
-
-   *Note Converting a Character::, for more information on `btowc'.
-Note that this change probably does not improve the performance of the
-program a lot since the `wctype' function still has to make the string
-comparisons.  It gets really interesting if the `is_in_class' function
-is called more than once for the same class name.  In this case the
-variable DESC could be computed once and reused for all the calls.
-Therefore the above form of the function is probably not the final one.
-
diff --git a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info-10 b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info-10
index ce0c969..7382771 100644
--- a/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info-10
+++ b/arm-buildroot-linux-gnueabi/sysroot/usr/share/info/libc.info-10
@@ -1,7 +1,24 @@
-This is
-/usr/local/google/home/jnewlin/src/uclibc/buildroot/output/build/glibc-2.19/build/manual/libc.info,
-produced by makeinfo version 4.13 from libc.texinfo.
+This is libc.info, produced by makeinfo version 5.2 from libc.texinfo.
 
+This file documents the GNU C Library.
+
+   This is 'The GNU C Library Reference Manual', for version 2.19
+(Buildroot).
+
+   Copyright (C) 1993-2014 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+
+   Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
+under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3 or
+any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with the
+Invariant Sections being "Free Software Needs Free Documentation" and
+"GNU Lesser General Public License", the Front-Cover texts being "A GNU
+Manual", and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a) below.  A copy of the
+license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation
+License".
+
+   (a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: "You have the freedom to copy and
+modify this GNU manual.  Buying copies from the FSF supports it in
+developing GNU and promoting software freedom."
 INFO-DIR-SECTION Software libraries
 START-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
 * Libc: (libc).                 C library.
@@ -1692,8438 +1709,5814 @@
 * ynl: (libc)Special Functions.
 END-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
 
-   This file documents the GNU C Library.
-
-   This is `The GNU C Library Reference Manual', for version 2.19
-(Buildroot).
-
-   Copyright (C) 1993-2014 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-   Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
-under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version
-1.3 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
-with the Invariant Sections being "Free Software Needs Free
-Documentation" and "GNU Lesser General Public License", the Front-Cover
-texts being "A GNU Manual", and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a)
-below.  A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU
-Free Documentation License".
-
-   (a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: "You have the freedom to copy and
-modify this GNU manual.  Buying copies from the FSF supports it in
-developing GNU and promoting software freedom."
-
 
-File: libc.info,  Node: Library Summary,  Next: Installation,  Prev: Language Features,  Up: Top
+File: libc.info,  Node: Argp Examples,  Next: Argp User Customization,  Prev: Argp Help,  Up: Argp
 
-Appendix B Summary of Library Facilities
-****************************************
+25.3.11 Argp Examples
+---------------------
 
-This appendix is a complete list of the facilities declared within the
-header files supplied with the GNU C Library.  Each entry also lists the
-standard or other source from which each facility is derived, and tells
-you where in the manual you can find more information about how to use
-it.
-
-`long int a64l (const char *STRING)'
-     `stdlib.h' (XPG):  *note Encode Binary Data::.
-
-`void abort (void)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Aborting a Program::.
-
-`int abs (int NUMBER)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Absolute Value::.
-
-`int accept (int SOCKET, struct sockaddr *ADDR, socklen_t *LENGTH_PTR)'
-     `sys/socket.h' (BSD):  *note Accepting Connections::.
-
-`int access (const char *FILENAME, int HOW)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Testing File Access::.
-
-`ACCOUNTING'
-     `utmp.h' (SVID):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`double acos (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`float acosf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`double acosh (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`float acoshf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`long double acoshl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`long double acosl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`int addmntent (FILE *STREAM, const struct mntent *MNT)'
-     `mntent.h' (BSD):  *note mtab::.
-
-`int adjtime (const struct timeval *DELTA, struct timeval *OLDDELTA)'
-     `sys/time.h' (BSD):  *note High-Resolution Calendar::.
-
-`int adjtimex (struct timex *TIMEX)'
-     `sys/timex.h' (GNU):  *note High-Resolution Calendar::.
-
-`AF_FILE'
-     `sys/socket.h' (GNU):  *note Address Formats::.
-
-`AF_INET'
-     `sys/socket.h' (BSD):  *note Address Formats::.
-
-`AF_INET6'
-     `sys/socket.h' (IPv6 Basic API):  *note Address Formats::.
-
-`AF_LOCAL'
-     `sys/socket.h' (POSIX):  *note Address Formats::.
-
-`AF_UNIX'
-     `sys/socket.h' (BSD, Unix98):  *note Address Formats::.
-
-`AF_UNSPEC'
-     `sys/socket.h' (BSD):  *note Address Formats::.
-
-`int aio_cancel (int FILDES, struct aiocb *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (POSIX.1b):  *note Cancel AIO Operations::.
-
-`int aio_cancel64 (int FILDES, struct aiocb64 *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (Unix98):  *note Cancel AIO Operations::.
-
-`int aio_error (const struct aiocb *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (POSIX.1b):  *note Status of AIO Operations::.
-
-`int aio_error64 (const struct aiocb64 *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (Unix98):  *note Status of AIO Operations::.
-
-`int aio_fsync (int OP, struct aiocb *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (POSIX.1b):  *note Synchronizing AIO Operations::.
-
-`int aio_fsync64 (int OP, struct aiocb64 *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (Unix98):  *note Synchronizing AIO Operations::.
-
-`void aio_init (const struct aioinit *INIT)'
-     `aio.h' (GNU):  *note Configuration of AIO::.
-
-`int aio_read (struct aiocb *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (POSIX.1b):  *note Asynchronous Reads/Writes::.
-
-`int aio_read64 (struct aiocb64 *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (Unix98):  *note Asynchronous Reads/Writes::.
-
-`ssize_t aio_return (struct aiocb *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (POSIX.1b):  *note Status of AIO Operations::.
-
-`ssize_t aio_return64 (struct aiocb64 *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (Unix98):  *note Status of AIO Operations::.
-
-`int aio_suspend (const struct aiocb *const LIST[], int NENT, const struct timespec *TIMEOUT)'
-     `aio.h' (POSIX.1b):  *note Synchronizing AIO Operations::.
-
-`int aio_suspend64 (const struct aiocb64 *const LIST[], int NENT, const struct timespec *TIMEOUT)'
-     `aio.h' (Unix98):  *note Synchronizing AIO Operations::.
-
-`int aio_write (struct aiocb *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (POSIX.1b):  *note Asynchronous Reads/Writes::.
-
-`int aio_write64 (struct aiocb64 *AIOCBP)'
-     `aio.h' (Unix98):  *note Asynchronous Reads/Writes::.
-
-`unsigned int alarm (unsigned int SECONDS)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Setting an Alarm::.
-
-`void * aligned_alloc (size_t ALIGNMENT, size_t SIZE)'
-     `stdlib.h' (stdlib.h):  *note Aligned Memory Blocks::.
-
-`void * alloca (size_t SIZE)'
-     `stdlib.h' (GNU, BSD):  *note Variable Size Automatic::.
-
-`int alphasort (const void *A, const void *B)'
-     `dirent.h' (BSD/SVID):  *note Scanning Directory Content::.
-
-`int alphasort64 (const void *A, const void *B)'
-     `dirent.h' (GNU):  *note Scanning Directory Content::.
-
-`tcflag_t ALTWERASE'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`int ARG_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (POSIX.1):  *note General Limits::.
-
-`error_t argp_err_exit_status'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Global Variables::.
-
-`void argp_error (const struct argp_state *STATE, const char *FMT, ...)'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Helper Functions::.
-
-`int ARGP_ERR_UNKNOWN'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Parser Functions::.
-
-`void argp_failure (const struct argp_state *STATE, int STATUS, int ERRNUM, const char *FMT, ...)'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Helper Functions::.
-
-`void argp_help (const struct argp *ARGP, FILE *STREAM, unsigned FLAGS, char *NAME)'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Help::.
-
-`ARGP_IN_ORDER'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Flags::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_ARG'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Special Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_ARGS'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Special Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_END'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Special Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_ERROR'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Special Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_FINI'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Special Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_HELP_ARGS_DOC'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Help Filter Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_HELP_DUP_ARGS_NOTE'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Help Filter Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_HELP_EXTRA'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Help Filter Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_HELP_HEADER'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Help Filter Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_HELP_POST_DOC'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Help Filter Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_HELP_PRE_DOC'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Help Filter Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_INIT'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Special Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_NO_ARGS'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Special Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_KEY_SUCCESS'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Special Keys::.
-
-`ARGP_LONG_ONLY'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Flags::.
-
-`ARGP_NO_ARGS'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Flags::.
-
-`ARGP_NO_ERRS'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Flags::.
-
-`ARGP_NO_EXIT'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Flags::.
-
-`ARGP_NO_HELP'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Flags::.
-
-`error_t argp_parse (const struct argp *ARGP, int ARGC, char **ARGV, unsigned FLAGS, int *ARG_INDEX, void *INPUT)'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Suboptions: Argp.
-
-`ARGP_PARSE_ARGV0'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Flags::.
-
-`const char * argp_program_bug_address'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Global Variables::.
-
-`const char * argp_program_version'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Global Variables::.
-
-`argp_program_version_hook'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Global Variables::.
-
-`ARGP_SILENT'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Flags::.
-
-`void argp_state_help (const struct argp_state *STATE, FILE *STREAM, unsigned FLAGS)'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Helper Functions::.
-
-`void argp_usage (const struct argp_state *STATE)'
-     `argp.h' (GNU):  *note Argp Helper Functions::.
-
-`error_t argz_add (char **ARGZ, size_t *ARGZ_LEN, const char *STR)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`error_t argz_add_sep (char **ARGZ, size_t *ARGZ_LEN, const char *STR, int DELIM)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`error_t argz_append (char **ARGZ, size_t *ARGZ_LEN, const char *BUF, size_t BUF_LEN)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`size_t argz_count (const char *ARGZ, size_t ARG_LEN)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`error_t argz_create (char *const ARGV[], char **ARGZ, size_t *ARGZ_LEN)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`error_t argz_create_sep (const char *STRING, int SEP, char **ARGZ, size_t *ARGZ_LEN)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`void argz_delete (char **ARGZ, size_t *ARGZ_LEN, char *ENTRY)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`void argz_extract (const char *ARGZ, size_t ARGZ_LEN, char **ARGV)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`error_t argz_insert (char **ARGZ, size_t *ARGZ_LEN, char *BEFORE, const char *ENTRY)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`char * argz_next (const char *ARGZ, size_t ARGZ_LEN, const char *ENTRY)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`error_t argz_replace (char **ARGZ, size_t *ARGZ_LEN, const char *STR, const char *WITH, unsigned *REPLACE_COUNT)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`void argz_stringify (char *ARGZ, size_t LEN, int SEP)'
-     `argz.h' (GNU):  *note Argz Functions::.
-
-`char * asctime (const struct tm *BROKENTIME)'
-     `time.h' (ISO):  *note Formatting Calendar Time::.
-
-`char * asctime_r (const struct tm *BROKENTIME, char *BUFFER)'
-     `time.h' (POSIX.1c):  *note Formatting Calendar Time::.
-
-`double asin (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`float asinf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`double asinh (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`float asinhf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`long double asinhl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`long double asinl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`int asprintf (char **PTR, const char *TEMPLATE, ...)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Dynamic Output::.
-
-`void assert (int EXPRESSION)'
-     `assert.h' (ISO):  *note Consistency Checking::.
-
-`void assert_perror (int ERRNUM)'
-     `assert.h' (GNU):  *note Consistency Checking::.
-
-`double atan (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`double atan2 (double Y, double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`float atan2f (float Y, float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`long double atan2l (long double Y, long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`float atanf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`double atanh (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`float atanhf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`long double atanhl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`long double atanl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`int atexit (void (*FUNCTION) (void))'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Cleanups on Exit::.
-
-`double atof (const char *STRING)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Parsing of Floats::.
-
-`int atoi (const char *STRING)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Parsing of Integers::.
-
-`long int atol (const char *STRING)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Parsing of Integers::.
-
-`long long int atoll (const char *STRING)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Parsing of Integers::.
-
-`B0'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B110'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B115200'
-     `termios.h' (GNU):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B1200'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B134'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B150'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B1800'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B19200'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B200'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B230400'
-     `termios.h' (GNU):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B2400'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B300'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B38400'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B460800'
-     `termios.h' (GNU):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B4800'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B50'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B57600'
-     `termios.h' (GNU):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B600'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B75'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`B9600'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`int backtrace (void **BUFFER, int SIZE)'
-     `execinfo.h' (GNU):  *note Backtraces::.
-
-`char ** backtrace_symbols (void *const *BUFFER, int SIZE)'
-     `execinfo.h' (GNU):  *note Backtraces::.
-
-`void backtrace_symbols_fd (void *const *BUFFER, int SIZE, int FD)'
-     `execinfo.h' (GNU):  *note Backtraces::.
-
-`char * basename (const char *FILENAME)'
-     `string.h' (GNU):  *note Finding Tokens in a String::.
-
-`char * basename (const char *PATH)'
-     `libgen.h' (XPG):  *note Finding Tokens in a String::.
-
-`int BC_BASE_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Utility Limits::.
-
-`int BC_DIM_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Utility Limits::.
-
-`int bcmp (const void *A1, const void *A2, size_t SIZE)'
-     `string.h' (BSD):  *note String/Array Comparison::.
-
-`void bcopy (const void *FROM, void *TO, size_t SIZE)'
-     `string.h' (BSD):  *note Copying and Concatenation::.
-
-`int BC_SCALE_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Utility Limits::.
-
-`int BC_STRING_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Utility Limits::.
-
-`int bind (int SOCKET, struct sockaddr *ADDR, socklen_t LENGTH)'
-     `sys/socket.h' (BSD):  *note Setting Address::.
-
-`char * bindtextdomain (const char *DOMAINNAME, const char *DIRNAME)'
-     `libintl.h' (GNU):  *note Locating gettext catalog::.
-
-`char * bind_textdomain_codeset (const char *DOMAINNAME, const char *CODESET)'
-     `libintl.h' (GNU):  *note Charset conversion in gettext::.
-
-`blkcnt64_t'
-     `sys/types.h' (Unix98):  *note Attribute Meanings::.
-
-`blkcnt_t'
-     `sys/types.h' (Unix98):  *note Attribute Meanings::.
-
-`BOOT_TIME'
-     `utmp.h' (SVID):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`BOOT_TIME'
-     `utmpx.h' (XPG4.2):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`int brk (void *ADDR)'
-     `unistd.h' (BSD):  *note Resizing the Data Segment::.
-
-`tcflag_t BRKINT'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Input Modes::.
-
-`_BSD_SOURCE'
-     (GNU):  *note Feature Test Macros::.
-
-`void * bsearch (const void *KEY, const void *ARRAY, size_t COUNT, size_t SIZE, comparison_fn_t COMPARE)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Array Search Function::.
-
-`wint_t btowc (int C)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Converting a Character::.
-
-`int BUFSIZ'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Controlling Buffering::.
-
-`void bzero (void *BLOCK, size_t SIZE)'
-     `string.h' (BSD):  *note Copying and Concatenation::.
-
-`double cabs (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Absolute Value::.
-
-`float cabsf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Absolute Value::.
-
-`long double cabsl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Absolute Value::.
-
-`complex double cacos (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex float cacosf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex double cacosh (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex float cacoshf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double cacoshl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double cacosl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`void * calloc (size_t COUNT, size_t ELTSIZE)'
-     `malloc.h', `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Allocating Cleared Space::.
-
-`char * canonicalize_file_name (const char *NAME)'
-     `stdlib.h' (GNU):  *note Symbolic Links::.
-
-`double carg (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`float cargf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`long double cargl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`complex double casin (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex float casinf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex double casinh (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex float casinhf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double casinhl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double casinl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex double catan (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex float catanf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex double catanh (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex float catanhf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double catanhl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double catanl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Inverse Trig Functions::.
-
-`nl_catd catopen (const char *CAT_NAME, int FLAG)'
-     `nl_types.h' (X/Open):  *note The catgets Functions::.
-
-`int cbc_crypt (char *KEY, char *BLOCKS, unsigned LEN, unsigned MODE, char *IVEC)'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`double cbrt (double X)'
-     `math.h' (BSD):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`float cbrtf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (BSD):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`long double cbrtl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (BSD):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex double ccos (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex float ccosf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex double ccosh (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex float ccoshf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double ccoshl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double ccosl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`cc_t'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Mode Data Types::.
-
-`tcflag_t CCTS_OFLOW'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`double ceil (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding Functions::.
-
-`float ceilf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding Functions::.
-
-`long double ceill (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding Functions::.
-
-`complex double cexp (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex float cexpf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex long double cexpl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`speed_t cfgetispeed (const struct termios *TERMIOS-P)'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`speed_t cfgetospeed (const struct termios *TERMIOS-P)'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`void cfmakeraw (struct termios *TERMIOS-P)'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Noncanonical Input::.
-
-`void cfree (void *PTR)'
-     `stdlib.h' (Sun):  *note Freeing after Malloc::.
-
-`int cfsetispeed (struct termios *TERMIOS-P, speed_t SPEED)'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`int cfsetospeed (struct termios *TERMIOS-P, speed_t SPEED)'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`int cfsetspeed (struct termios *TERMIOS-P, speed_t SPEED)'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Line Speed::.
-
-`CHAR_BIT'
-     `limits.h' (ISO):  *note Width of Type::.
-
-`CHAR_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (ISO):  *note Range of Type::.
-
-`CHAR_MIN'
-     `limits.h' (ISO):  *note Range of Type::.
-
-`int chdir (const char *FILENAME)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Working Directory::.
-
-`int CHILD_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (POSIX.1):  *note General Limits::.
-
-`int chmod (const char *FILENAME, mode_t MODE)'
-     `sys/stat.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Setting Permissions::.
-
-`int chown (const char *FILENAME, uid_t OWNER, gid_t GROUP)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note File Owner::.
-
-`tcflag_t CIGNORE'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`double cimag (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`float cimagf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`long double cimagl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`int clearenv (void)'
-     `stdlib.h' (GNU):  *note Environment Access::.
-
-`void clearerr (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Error Recovery::.
-
-`void clearerr_unlocked (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Error Recovery::.
-
-`int CLK_TCK'
-     `time.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Processor Time::.
-
-`tcflag_t CLOCAL'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`clock_t clock (void)'
-     `time.h' (ISO):  *note CPU Time::.
-
-`int CLOCKS_PER_SEC'
-     `time.h' (ISO):  *note CPU Time::.
-
-`clock_t'
-     `time.h' (ISO):  *note CPU Time::.
-
-`complex double clog (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex double clog10 (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (GNU):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex float clog10f (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (GNU):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex long double clog10l (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (GNU):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex float clogf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex long double clogl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`int close (int FILEDES)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Opening and Closing Files::.
-
-`int closedir (DIR *DIRSTREAM)'
-     `dirent.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Reading/Closing Directory::.
-
-`void closelog (void)'
-     `syslog.h' (BSD):  *note closelog::.
-
-`int COLL_WEIGHTS_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Utility Limits::.
-
-`size_t confstr (int PARAMETER, char *BUF, size_t LEN)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.2):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`complex double conj (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`complex float conjf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`complex long double conjl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`int connect (int SOCKET, struct sockaddr *ADDR, socklen_t LENGTH)'
-     `sys/socket.h' (BSD):  *note Connecting::.
-
-`cookie_close_function'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Hook Functions::.
-
-`cookie_io_functions_t'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Streams and Cookies::.
-
-`cookie_read_function'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Hook Functions::.
-
-`cookie_seek_function'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Hook Functions::.
-
-`cookie_write_function'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Hook Functions::.
-
-`double copysign (double X, double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note FP Bit Twiddling::.
-
-`float copysignf (float X, float Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note FP Bit Twiddling::.
-
-`long double copysignl (long double X, long double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note FP Bit Twiddling::.
-
-`double cos (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`float cosf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`double cosh (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`float coshf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`long double coshl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`long double cosl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex double cpow (complex double BASE, complex double POWER)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex float cpowf (complex float BASE, complex float POWER)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex long double cpowl (complex long double BASE, complex long double POWER)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex double cproj (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`complex float cprojf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`complex long double cprojl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`void CPU_CLR (int CPU, cpu_set_t *SET)'
-     `sched.h' (GNU):  *note CPU Affinity::.
-
-`int CPU_ISSET (int CPU, const cpu_set_t *SET)'
-     `sched.h' (GNU):  *note CPU Affinity::.
-
-`void CPU_SET (int CPU, cpu_set_t *SET)'
-     `sched.h' (GNU):  *note CPU Affinity::.
-
-`int CPU_SETSIZE'
-     `sched.h' (GNU):  *note CPU Affinity::.
-
-`cpu_set_t'
-     `sched.h' (GNU):  *note CPU Affinity::.
-
-`void CPU_ZERO (cpu_set_t *SET)'
-     `sched.h' (GNU):  *note CPU Affinity::.
-
-`tcflag_t CREAD'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`double creal (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`float crealf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`long double creall (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Operations on Complex::.
-
-`int creat (const char *FILENAME, mode_t MODE)'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Opening and Closing Files::.
-
-`int creat64 (const char *FILENAME, mode_t MODE)'
-     `fcntl.h' (Unix98):  *note Opening and Closing Files::.
-
-`tcflag_t CRTS_IFLOW'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`char * crypt (const char *KEY, const char *SALT)'
-     `crypt.h' (BSD, SVID):  *note crypt::.
-
-`char * crypt_r (const char *KEY, const char *SALT, struct crypt_data * DATA)'
-     `crypt.h' (GNU):  *note crypt::.
-
-`tcflag_t CS5'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t CS6'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t CS7'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t CS8'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`complex double csin (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex float csinf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex double csinh (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex float csinhf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double csinhl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double csinl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`tcflag_t CSIZE'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`_CS_LFS64_CFLAGS'
-     `unistd.h' (Unix98):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`_CS_LFS64_LDFLAGS'
-     `unistd.h' (Unix98):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`_CS_LFS64_LIBS'
-     `unistd.h' (Unix98):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`_CS_LFS64_LINTFLAGS'
-     `unistd.h' (Unix98):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`_CS_LFS_CFLAGS'
-     `unistd.h' (Unix98):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`_CS_LFS_LDFLAGS'
-     `unistd.h' (Unix98):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`_CS_LFS_LIBS'
-     `unistd.h' (Unix98):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`_CS_LFS_LINTFLAGS'
-     `unistd.h' (Unix98):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`_CS_PATH'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.2):  *note String Parameters::.
-
-`complex double csqrt (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex float csqrtf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`complex long double csqrtl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`tcflag_t CSTOPB'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`complex double ctan (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex float ctanf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`complex double ctanh (complex double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex float ctanhf (complex float Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double ctanhl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Hyperbolic Functions::.
-
-`complex long double ctanl (complex long double Z)'
-     `complex.h' (ISO):  *note Trig Functions::.
-
-`char * ctermid (char *STRING)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Identifying the Terminal::.
-
-`char * ctime (const time_t *TIME)'
-     `time.h' (ISO):  *note Formatting Calendar Time::.
-
-`char * ctime_r (const time_t *TIME, char *BUFFER)'
-     `time.h' (POSIX.1c):  *note Formatting Calendar Time::.
-
-`char * cuserid (char *STRING)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Who Logged In::.
-
-`int daylight'
-     `time.h' (SVID):  *note Time Zone Functions::.
-
-`DBL_DIG'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`DBL_EPSILON'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`DBL_MANT_DIG'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`DBL_MAX'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`DBL_MAX_10_EXP'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`DBL_MAX_EXP'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`DBL_MIN'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`DBL_MIN_10_EXP'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`DBL_MIN_EXP'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`char * dcgettext (const char *DOMAINNAME, const char *MSGID, int CATEGORY)'
-     `libintl.h' (GNU):  *note Translation with gettext::.
-
-`char * dcngettext (const char *DOMAIN, const char *MSGID1, const char *MSGID2, unsigned long int N, int CATEGORY)'
-     `libintl.h' (GNU):  *note Advanced gettext functions::.
-
-`DEAD_PROCESS'
-     `utmp.h' (SVID):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`DEAD_PROCESS'
-     `utmpx.h' (XPG4.2):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`_DEFAULT_SOURCE'
-     (GNU):  *note Feature Test Macros::.
-
-`DES_DECRYPT'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`DES_ENCRYPT'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`DESERR_BADPARAM'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`DESERR_HWERROR'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`DESERR_NOHWDEVICE'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`DESERR_NONE'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`int DES_FAILED (int ERR)'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`DES_HW'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`void des_setparity (char *KEY)'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`DES_SW'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`dev_t'
-     `sys/types.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Attribute Meanings::.
-
-`char * dgettext (const char *DOMAINNAME, const char *MSGID)'
-     `libintl.h' (GNU):  *note Translation with gettext::.
-
-`double difftime (time_t TIME1, time_t TIME0)'
-     `time.h' (ISO):  *note Elapsed Time::.
-
-`DIR'
-     `dirent.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Opening a Directory::.
-
-`int dirfd (DIR *DIRSTREAM)'
-     `dirent.h' (GNU):  *note Opening a Directory::.
-
-`char * dirname (char *PATH)'
-     `libgen.h' (XPG):  *note Finding Tokens in a String::.
-
-`div_t div (int NUMERATOR, int DENOMINATOR)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Integer Division::.
-
-`div_t'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Integer Division::.
-
-`char * dngettext (const char *DOMAIN, const char *MSGID1, const char *MSGID2, unsigned long int N)'
-     `libintl.h' (GNU):  *note Advanced gettext functions::.
-
-`double drand48 (void)'
-     `stdlib.h' (SVID):  *note SVID Random::.
-
-`int drand48_r (struct drand48_data *BUFFER, double *RESULT)'
-     `stdlib.h' (GNU):  *note SVID Random::.
-
-`double drem (double NUMERATOR, double DENOMINATOR)'
-     `math.h' (BSD):  *note Remainder Functions::.
-
-`float dremf (float NUMERATOR, float DENOMINATOR)'
-     `math.h' (BSD):  *note Remainder Functions::.
-
-`long double dreml (long double NUMERATOR, long double DENOMINATOR)'
-     `math.h' (BSD):  *note Remainder Functions::.
-
-`mode_t DTTOIF (int DTYPE)'
-     `dirent.h' (BSD):  *note Directory Entries::.
-
-`int dup (int OLD)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Duplicating Descriptors::.
-
-`int dup2 (int OLD, int NEW)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Duplicating Descriptors::.
-
-`int E2BIG'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Argument list too long):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EACCES'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Permission denied):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EADDRINUSE'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Address already in use):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EADDRNOTAVAIL'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Cannot assign requested address):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EADV'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Advertise error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EAFNOSUPPORT'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Address family not supported by protocol):  *note
-     Error Codes::.
-
-`int EAGAIN'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Resource temporarily unavailable):  *note
-     Error Codes::.
-
-`int EALREADY'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Operation already in progress):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EAUTH'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Authentication error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EBACKGROUND'
-     `errno.h' (GNU: Inappropriate operation for background process):
-     *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EBADE'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Invalid exchange):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EBADF'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Bad file descriptor):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EBADFD'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: File descriptor in bad state):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EBADMSG'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: Bad message):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EBADR'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Invalid request descriptor):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EBADRPC'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: RPC struct is bad):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EBADRQC'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Invalid request code):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EBADSLT'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Invalid slot):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EBFONT'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Bad font file format):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EBUSY'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Device or resource busy):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ECANCELED'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Operation canceled):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ecb_crypt (char *KEY, char *BLOCKS, unsigned LEN, unsigned MODE)'
-     `rpc/des_crypt.h' (SUNRPC):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`int ECHILD'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: No child processes):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`tcflag_t ECHO'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t ECHOCTL'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t ECHOE'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t ECHOK'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t ECHOKE'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t ECHONL'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t ECHOPRT'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`int ECHRNG'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Channel number out of range):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ECOMM'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Communication error on send):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ECONNABORTED'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Software caused connection abort):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ECONNREFUSED'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Connection refused):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ECONNRESET'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Connection reset by peer):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`char * ecvt (double VALUE, int NDIGIT, int *DECPT, int *NEG)'
-     `stdlib.h' (SVID, Unix98):  *note System V Number Conversion::.
-
-`int ecvt_r (double VALUE, int NDIGIT, int *DECPT, int *NEG, char *BUF, size_t LEN)'
-     `stdlib.h' (GNU):  *note System V Number Conversion::.
-
-`int ED'
-     `errno.h' (GNU: ?):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EDEADLK'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Resource deadlock avoided):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EDEADLOCK'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: File locking deadlock error):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EDESTADDRREQ'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Destination address required):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EDIED'
-     `errno.h' (GNU: Translator died):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EDOM'
-     `errno.h' (ISO: Numerical argument out of domain):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EDOTDOT'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: RFS specific error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EDQUOT'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Disk quota exceeded):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EEXIST'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: File exists):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EFAULT'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Bad address):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EFBIG'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: File too large):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EFTYPE'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Inappropriate file type or format):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EGRATUITOUS'
-     `errno.h' (GNU: Gratuitous error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EGREGIOUS'
-     `errno.h' (GNU: You really blew it this time):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EHOSTDOWN'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Host is down):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EHOSTUNREACH'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: No route to host):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EHWPOISON'
-     `errno.h' (Linux: Memory page has hardware error):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EIDRM'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: Identifier removed):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EIEIO'
-     `errno.h' (GNU: Computer bought the farm):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EILSEQ'
-     `errno.h' (ISO: Invalid or incomplete multibyte or wide
-     character):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EINPROGRESS'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Operation now in progress):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EINTR'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Interrupted system call):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EINVAL'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Invalid argument):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EIO'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Input/output error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EISCONN'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Transport endpoint is already connected):  *note
-     Error Codes::.
-
-`int EISDIR'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Is a directory):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EISNAM'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Is a named type file):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EKEYEXPIRED'
-     `errno.h' (Linux: Key has expired):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EKEYREJECTED'
-     `errno.h' (Linux: Key was rejected by service):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EKEYREVOKED'
-     `errno.h' (Linux: Key has been revoked):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EL2HLT'
-     `errno.h' (Obsolete: Level 2 halted):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EL2NSYNC'
-     `errno.h' (Obsolete: Level 2 not synchronized):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EL3HLT'
-     `errno.h' (Obsolete: Level 3 halted):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EL3RST'
-     `errno.h' (Obsolete: Level 3 reset):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ELIBACC'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Can not access a needed shared library):
-     *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ELIBBAD'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Accessing a corrupted shared library):  *note
-     Error Codes::.
-
-`int ELIBEXEC'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Cannot exec a shared library directly):
-     *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ELIBMAX'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Attempting to link in too many shared
-     libraries):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ELIBSCN'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: .lib section in a.out corrupted):  *note
-     Error Codes::.
-
-`int ELNRNG'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Link number out of range):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ELOOP'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Too many levels of symbolic links):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EMEDIUMTYPE'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Wrong medium type):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EMFILE'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Too many open files):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EMLINK'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Too many links):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`EMPTY'
-     `utmp.h' (SVID):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`EMPTY'
-     `utmpx.h' (XPG4.2):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`int EMSGSIZE'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Message too long):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EMULTIHOP'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: Multihop attempted):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENAMETOOLONG'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: File name too long):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENAVAIL'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: No XENIX semaphores available):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`void encrypt (char *BLOCK, int EDFLAG)'
-     `crypt.h' (BSD, SVID):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`void encrypt_r (char *BLOCK, int EDFLAG, struct crypt_data * DATA)'
-     `crypt.h' (GNU):  *note DES Encryption::.
-
-`void endfsent (void)'
-     `fstab.h' (BSD):  *note fstab::.
-
-`void endgrent (void)'
-     `grp.h' (SVID, BSD):  *note Scanning All Groups::.
-
-`void endhostent (void)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Host Names::.
-
-`int endmntent (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `mntent.h' (BSD):  *note mtab::.
-
-`void endnetent (void)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Networks Database::.
-
-`void endnetgrent (void)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Lookup Netgroup::.
-
-`void endprotoent (void)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Protocols Database::.
-
-`void endpwent (void)'
-     `pwd.h' (SVID, BSD):  *note Scanning All Users::.
-
-`void endservent (void)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Services Database::.
-
-`void endutent (void)'
-     `utmp.h' (SVID):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`void endutxent (void)'
-     `utmpx.h' (XPG4.2):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`int ENEEDAUTH'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Need authenticator):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENETDOWN'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Network is down):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENETRESET'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Network dropped connection on reset):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENETUNREACH'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Network is unreachable):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENFILE'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Too many open files in system):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENOANO'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: No anode):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOBUFS'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: No buffer space available):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOCSI'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: No CSI structure available):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENODATA'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: No data available):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENODEV'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: No such device):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOENT'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: No such file or directory):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENOEXEC'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Exec format error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOKEY'
-     `errno.h' (Linux: Required key not available):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENOLCK'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: No locks available):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOLINK'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: Link has been severed):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOMEDIUM'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: No medium found):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOMEM'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Cannot allocate memory):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOMSG'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: No message of desired type):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENONET'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Machine is not on the network):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENOPKG'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Package not installed):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOPROTOOPT'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Protocol not available):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOSPC'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: No space left on device):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOSR'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: Out of streams resources):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOSTR'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: Device not a stream):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOSYS'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Function not implemented):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTBLK'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Block device required):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTCONN'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Transport endpoint is not connected):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTDIR'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Not a directory):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTEMPTY'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Directory not empty):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTNAM'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Not a XENIX named type file):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTRECOVERABLE'
-     `errno.h' (Linux: State not recoverable):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTSOCK'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Socket operation on non-socket):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTSUP'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Not supported):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTTY'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Inappropriate ioctl for device):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ENOTUNIQ'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Name not unique on network):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`char ** environ'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Environment Access::.
-
-`error_t envz_add (char **ENVZ, size_t *ENVZ_LEN, const char *NAME, const char *VALUE)'
-     `envz.h' (GNU):  *note Envz Functions::.
-
-`char * envz_entry (const char *ENVZ, size_t ENVZ_LEN, const char *NAME)'
-     `envz.h' (GNU):  *note Envz Functions::.
-
-`char * envz_get (const char *ENVZ, size_t ENVZ_LEN, const char *NAME)'
-     `envz.h' (GNU):  *note Envz Functions::.
-
-`error_t envz_merge (char **ENVZ, size_t *ENVZ_LEN, const char *ENVZ2, size_t ENVZ2_LEN, int OVERRIDE)'
-     `envz.h' (GNU):  *note Envz Functions::.
-
-`void envz_strip (char **ENVZ, size_t *ENVZ_LEN)'
-     `envz.h' (GNU):  *note Envz Functions::.
-
-`int ENXIO'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: No such device or address):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EOF'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note EOF and Errors::.
-
-`int EOPNOTSUPP'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Operation not supported):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EOVERFLOW'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: Value too large for defined data type):  *note
-     Error Codes::.
-
-`int EOWNERDEAD'
-     `errno.h' (Linux: Owner died):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EPERM'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Operation not permitted):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EPFNOSUPPORT'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Protocol family not supported):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EPIPE'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Broken pipe):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EPROCLIM'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Too many processes):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EPROCUNAVAIL'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: RPC bad procedure for program):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EPROGMISMATCH'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: RPC program version wrong):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EPROGUNAVAIL'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: RPC program not available):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EPROTO'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: Protocol error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EPROTONOSUPPORT'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Protocol not supported):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EPROTOTYPE'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Protocol wrong type for socket):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EQUIV_CLASS_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Utility Limits::.
-
-`double erand48 (unsigned short int XSUBI[3])'
-     `stdlib.h' (SVID):  *note SVID Random::.
-
-`int erand48_r (unsigned short int XSUBI[3], struct drand48_data *BUFFER, double *RESULT)'
-     `stdlib.h' (GNU):  *note SVID Random::.
-
-`int ERANGE'
-     `errno.h' (ISO: Numerical result out of range):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EREMCHG'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Remote address changed):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EREMOTE'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Object is remote):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EREMOTEIO'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Remote I/O error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ERESTART'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Interrupted system call should be restarted):
-     *note Error Codes::.
-
-`double erf (double X)'
-     `math.h' (SVID):  *note Special Functions::.
-
-`double erfc (double X)'
-     `math.h' (SVID):  *note Special Functions::.
-
-`float erfcf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (SVID):  *note Special Functions::.
-
-`long double erfcl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (SVID):  *note Special Functions::.
-
-`float erff (float X)'
-     `math.h' (SVID):  *note Special Functions::.
-
-`int ERFKILL'
-     `errno.h' (Linux: Operation not possible due to RF-kill):  *note
-     Error Codes::.
-
-`long double erfl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (SVID):  *note Special Functions::.
-
-`int EROFS'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Read-only file system):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ERPCMISMATCH'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: RPC version wrong):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`void err (int STATUS, const char *FORMAT, ...)'
-     `err.h' (BSD):  *note Error Messages::.
-
-`volatile int errno'
-     `errno.h' (ISO):  *note Checking for Errors::.
-
-`void error (int STATUS, int ERRNUM, const char *FORMAT, ...)'
-     `error.h' (GNU):  *note Error Messages::.
-
-`void error_at_line (int STATUS, int ERRNUM, const char *FNAME, unsigned int LINENO, const char *FORMAT, ...)'
-     `error.h' (GNU):  *note Error Messages::.
-
-`unsigned int error_message_count'
-     `error.h' (GNU):  *note Error Messages::.
-
-`int error_one_per_line'
-     `error.h' (GNU):  *note Error Messages::.
-
-`void errx (int STATUS, const char *FORMAT, ...)'
-     `err.h' (BSD):  *note Error Messages::.
-
-`int ESHUTDOWN'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Cannot send after transport endpoint shutdown):
-     *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ESOCKTNOSUPPORT'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Socket type not supported):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ESPIPE'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Illegal seek):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ESRCH'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: No such process):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ESRMNT'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Srmount error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ESTALE'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Stale file handle):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ESTRPIPE'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Streams pipe error):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ETIME'
-     `errno.h' (XOPEN: Timer expired):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ETIMEDOUT'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Connection timed out):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int ETOOMANYREFS'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Too many references: cannot splice):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int ETXTBSY'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Text file busy):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EUCLEAN'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Structure needs cleaning):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EUNATCH'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Protocol driver not attached):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int EUSERS'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Too many users):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EWOULDBLOCK'
-     `errno.h' (BSD: Operation would block):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`int EXDEV'
-     `errno.h' (POSIX.1: Invalid cross-device link):  *note Error
-     Codes::.
-
-`int execl (const char *FILENAME, const char *ARG0, ...)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Executing a File::.
-
-`int execle (const char *FILENAME, const char *ARG0, ..., char *const ENV[])'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Executing a File::.
-
-`int execlp (const char *FILENAME, const char *ARG0, ...)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Executing a File::.
-
-`int execv (const char *FILENAME, char *const ARGV[])'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Executing a File::.
-
-`int execve (const char *FILENAME, char *const ARGV[], char *const ENV[])'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Executing a File::.
-
-`int execvp (const char *FILENAME, char *const ARGV[])'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Executing a File::.
-
-`int EXFULL'
-     `errno.h' (Linux???: Exchange full):  *note Error Codes::.
-
-`void _Exit (int STATUS)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Termination Internals::.
-
-`void _exit (int STATUS)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Termination Internals::.
-
-`void exit (int STATUS)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Normal Termination::.
-
-`int EXIT_FAILURE'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Exit Status::.
-
-`int EXIT_SUCCESS'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Exit Status::.
-
-`double exp (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`double exp10 (double X)'
-     `math.h' (GNU):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`float exp10f (float X)'
-     `math.h' (GNU):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`long double exp10l (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (GNU):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`double exp2 (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`float exp2f (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`long double exp2l (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`float expf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`long double expl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`double expm1 (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`float expm1f (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`long double expm1l (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`int EXPR_NEST_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Utility Limits::.
-
-`double fabs (double NUMBER)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Absolute Value::.
-
-`float fabsf (float NUMBER)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Absolute Value::.
-
-`long double fabsl (long double NUMBER)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Absolute Value::.
-
-`size_t __fbufsize (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Controlling Buffering::.
-
-`int fchdir (int FILEDES)'
-     `unistd.h' (XPG):  *note Working Directory::.
-
-`int fchmod (int FILEDES, mode_t MODE)'
-     `sys/stat.h' (BSD):  *note Setting Permissions::.
-
-`int fchown (int FILEDES, uid_t OWNER, gid_t GROUP)'
-     `unistd.h' (BSD):  *note File Owner::.
-
-`int fclose (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Closing Streams::.
-
-`int fcloseall (void)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Closing Streams::.
-
-`int fcntl (int FILEDES, int COMMAND, ...)'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Operations::.
-
-`char * fcvt (double VALUE, int NDIGIT, int *DECPT, int *NEG)'
-     `stdlib.h' (SVID, Unix98):  *note System V Number Conversion::.
-
-`int fcvt_r (double VALUE, int NDIGIT, int *DECPT, int *NEG, char *BUF, size_t LEN)'
-     `stdlib.h' (SVID, Unix98):  *note System V Number Conversion::.
-
-`int fdatasync (int FILDES)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX):  *note Synchronizing I/O::.
-
-`int FD_CLOEXEC'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Descriptor Flags::.
-
-`void FD_CLR (int FILEDES, fd_set *SET)'
-     `sys/types.h' (BSD):  *note Waiting for I/O::.
-
-`double fdim (double X, double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`float fdimf (float X, float Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`long double fdiml (long double X, long double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`int FD_ISSET (int FILEDES, const fd_set *SET)'
-     `sys/types.h' (BSD):  *note Waiting for I/O::.
-
-`FILE * fdopen (int FILEDES, const char *OPENTYPE)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Descriptors and Streams::.
-
-`DIR * fdopendir (int FD)'
-     `dirent.h' (GNU):  *note Opening a Directory::.
-
-`void FD_SET (int FILEDES, fd_set *SET)'
-     `sys/types.h' (BSD):  *note Waiting for I/O::.
-
-`fd_set'
-     `sys/types.h' (BSD):  *note Waiting for I/O::.
-
-`int FD_SETSIZE'
-     `sys/types.h' (BSD):  *note Waiting for I/O::.
-
-`int F_DUPFD'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Duplicating Descriptors::.
-
-`void FD_ZERO (fd_set *SET)'
-     `sys/types.h' (BSD):  *note Waiting for I/O::.
-
-`int feclearexcept (int EXCEPTS)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`int fedisableexcept (int EXCEPTS)'
-     `fenv.h' (GNU):  *note Control Functions::.
-
-`FE_DIVBYZERO'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`FE_DOWNWARD'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding::.
-
-`int feenableexcept (int EXCEPTS)'
-     `fenv.h' (GNU):  *note Control Functions::.
-
-`int fegetenv (fenv_t *ENVP)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Control Functions::.
-
-`int fegetexcept (void)'
-     `fenv.h' (GNU):  *note Control Functions::.
-
-`int fegetexceptflag (fexcept_t *FLAGP, int EXCEPTS)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`int fegetround (void)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding::.
-
-`int feholdexcept (fenv_t *ENVP)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Control Functions::.
-
-`FE_INEXACT'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`FE_INVALID'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`int feof (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note EOF and Errors::.
-
-`int feof_unlocked (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note EOF and Errors::.
-
-`FE_OVERFLOW'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`int feraiseexcept (int EXCEPTS)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`int ferror (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note EOF and Errors::.
-
-`int ferror_unlocked (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note EOF and Errors::.
-
-`int fesetenv (const fenv_t *ENVP)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Control Functions::.
-
-`int fesetexceptflag (const fexcept_t *FLAGP, int EXCEPTS)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`int fesetround (int ROUND)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding::.
-
-`int fetestexcept (int EXCEPTS)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`FE_TONEAREST'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding::.
-
-`FE_TOWARDZERO'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding::.
-
-`FE_UNDERFLOW'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Status bit operations::.
-
-`int feupdateenv (const fenv_t *ENVP)'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Control Functions::.
-
-`FE_UPWARD'
-     `fenv.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding::.
-
-`int fflush (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Flushing Buffers::.
-
-`int fflush_unlocked (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX):  *note Flushing Buffers::.
-
-`int fgetc (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`int fgetc_unlocked (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`int F_GETFD'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Descriptor Flags::.
-
-`int F_GETFL'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Getting File Status Flags::.
-
-`struct group * fgetgrent (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `grp.h' (SVID):  *note Scanning All Groups::.
-
-`int fgetgrent_r (FILE *STREAM, struct group *RESULT_BUF, char *BUFFER, size_t BUFLEN, struct group **RESULT)'
-     `grp.h' (GNU):  *note Scanning All Groups::.
-
-`int F_GETLK'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note File Locks::.
-
-`int F_GETOWN'
-     `fcntl.h' (BSD):  *note Interrupt Input::.
-
-`int fgetpos (FILE *STREAM, fpos_t *POSITION)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Portable Positioning::.
-
-`int fgetpos64 (FILE *STREAM, fpos64_t *POSITION)'
-     `stdio.h' (Unix98):  *note Portable Positioning::.
-
-`struct passwd * fgetpwent (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `pwd.h' (SVID):  *note Scanning All Users::.
-
-`int fgetpwent_r (FILE *STREAM, struct passwd *RESULT_BUF, char *BUFFER, size_t BUFLEN, struct passwd **RESULT)'
-     `pwd.h' (GNU):  *note Scanning All Users::.
-
-`char * fgets (char *S, int COUNT, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Line Input::.
-
-`char * fgets_unlocked (char *S, int COUNT, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Line Input::.
-
-`wint_t fgetwc (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`wint_t fgetwc_unlocked (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (GNU):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`wchar_t * fgetws (wchar_t *WS, int COUNT, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Line Input::.
-
-`wchar_t * fgetws_unlocked (wchar_t *WS, int COUNT, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (GNU):  *note Line Input::.
-
-`FILE'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Streams::.
-
-`int FILENAME_MAX'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Limits for Files::.
-
-`int fileno (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Descriptors and Streams::.
-
-`int fileno_unlocked (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Descriptors and Streams::.
-
-`int finite (double X)'
-     `math.h' (BSD):  *note Floating Point Classes::.
-
-`int finitef (float X)'
-     `math.h' (BSD):  *note Floating Point Classes::.
-
-`int finitel (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (BSD):  *note Floating Point Classes::.
-
-`int __flbf (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Controlling Buffering::.
-
-`void flockfile (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX):  *note Streams and Threads::.
-
-`double floor (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding Functions::.
-
-`float floorf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding Functions::.
-
-`long double floorl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Rounding Functions::.
-
-`FLT_DIG'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_EPSILON'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_MANT_DIG'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_MAX'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_MAX_10_EXP'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_MAX_EXP'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_MIN'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_MIN_10_EXP'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_MIN_EXP'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_RADIX'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`FLT_ROUNDS'
-     `float.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Parameters::.
-
-`void _flushlbf (void)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Flushing Buffers::.
-
-`tcflag_t FLUSHO'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`double fma (double X, double Y, double Z)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`float fmaf (float X, float Y, float Z)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`long double fmal (long double X, long double Y, long double Z)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`double fmax (double X, double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`float fmaxf (float X, float Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`long double fmaxl (long double X, long double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`FILE * fmemopen (void *BUF, size_t SIZE, const char *OPENTYPE)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note String Streams::.
-
-`double fmin (double X, double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`float fminf (float X, float Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`long double fminl (long double X, long double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Misc FP Arithmetic::.
-
-`double fmod (double NUMERATOR, double DENOMINATOR)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Remainder Functions::.
-
-`float fmodf (float NUMERATOR, float DENOMINATOR)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Remainder Functions::.
-
-`long double fmodl (long double NUMERATOR, long double DENOMINATOR)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Remainder Functions::.
-
-`int fmtmsg (long int CLASSIFICATION, const char *LABEL, int SEVERITY, const char *TEXT, const char *ACTION, const char *TAG)'
-     `fmtmsg.h' (XPG):  *note Printing Formatted Messages::.
-
-`int fnmatch (const char *PATTERN, const char *STRING, int FLAGS)'
-     `fnmatch.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Wildcard Matching::.
-
-`FNM_CASEFOLD'
-     `fnmatch.h' (GNU):  *note Wildcard Matching::.
-
-`FNM_EXTMATCH'
-     `fnmatch.h' (GNU):  *note Wildcard Matching::.
-
-`FNM_FILE_NAME'
-     `fnmatch.h' (GNU):  *note Wildcard Matching::.
-
-`FNM_LEADING_DIR'
-     `fnmatch.h' (GNU):  *note Wildcard Matching::.
-
-`FNM_NOESCAPE'
-     `fnmatch.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Wildcard Matching::.
-
-`FNM_PATHNAME'
-     `fnmatch.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Wildcard Matching::.
-
-`FNM_PERIOD'
-     `fnmatch.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Wildcard Matching::.
-
-`int F_OK'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Testing File Access::.
-
-`FILE * fopen (const char *FILENAME, const char *OPENTYPE)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Opening Streams::.
-
-`FILE * fopen64 (const char *FILENAME, const char *OPENTYPE)'
-     `stdio.h' (Unix98):  *note Opening Streams::.
-
-`FILE * fopencookie (void *COOKIE, const char *OPENTYPE, cookie_io_functions_t IO-FUNCTIONS)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Streams and Cookies::.
-
-`int FOPEN_MAX'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Opening Streams::.
-
-`pid_t fork (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Creating a Process::.
-
-`int forkpty (int *AMASTER, char *NAME, const struct termios *TERMP, const struct winsize *WINP)'
-     `pty.h' (BSD):  *note Pseudo-Terminal Pairs::.
-
-`long int fpathconf (int FILEDES, int PARAMETER)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Pathconf::.
-
-`int fpclassify (_float-type_ X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Floating Point Classes::.
-
-`FPE_DECOVF_TRAP'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`FPE_FLTDIV_FAULT'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`FPE_FLTDIV_TRAP'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`FPE_FLTOVF_FAULT'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`FPE_FLTOVF_TRAP'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`FPE_FLTUND_FAULT'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`FPE_FLTUND_TRAP'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`FPE_INTDIV_TRAP'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`FPE_INTOVF_TRAP'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`size_t __fpending (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Controlling Buffering::.
-
-`FPE_SUBRNG_TRAP'
-     `signal.h' (BSD):  *note Program Error Signals::.
-
-`int FP_ILOGB0'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`int FP_ILOGBNAN'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`fpos64_t'
-     `stdio.h' (Unix98):  *note Portable Positioning::.
-
-`fpos_t'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Portable Positioning::.
-
-`int fprintf (FILE *STREAM, const char *TEMPLATE, ...)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Formatted Output Functions::.
-
-`void __fpurge (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Flushing Buffers::.
-
-`int fputc (int C, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Simple Output::.
-
-`int fputc_unlocked (int C, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX):  *note Simple Output::.
-
-`int fputs (const char *S, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Simple Output::.
-
-`int fputs_unlocked (const char *S, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Simple Output::.
-
-`wint_t fputwc (wchar_t WC, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Simple Output::.
-
-`wint_t fputwc_unlocked (wchar_t WC, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (POSIX):  *note Simple Output::.
-
-`int fputws (const wchar_t *WS, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Simple Output::.
-
-`int fputws_unlocked (const wchar_t *WS, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (GNU):  *note Simple Output::.
-
-`F_RDLCK'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note File Locks::.
-
-`size_t fread (void *DATA, size_t SIZE, size_t COUNT, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Block Input/Output::.
-
-`int __freadable (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Opening Streams::.
-
-`int __freading (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Opening Streams::.
-
-`size_t fread_unlocked (void *DATA, size_t SIZE, size_t COUNT, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Block Input/Output::.
-
-`void free (void *PTR)'
-     `malloc.h', `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Freeing after Malloc::.
-
-`__free_hook'
-     `malloc.h' (GNU):  *note Hooks for Malloc::.
-
-`FILE * freopen (const char *FILENAME, const char *OPENTYPE, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Opening Streams::.
-
-`FILE * freopen64 (const char *FILENAME, const char *OPENTYPE, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (Unix98):  *note Opening Streams::.
-
-`double frexp (double VALUE, int *EXPONENT)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Normalization Functions::.
-
-`float frexpf (float VALUE, int *EXPONENT)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Normalization Functions::.
-
-`long double frexpl (long double VALUE, int *EXPONENT)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Normalization Functions::.
-
-`int fscanf (FILE *STREAM, const char *TEMPLATE, ...)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Formatted Input Functions::.
-
-`int fseek (FILE *STREAM, long int OFFSET, int WHENCE)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note File Positioning::.
-
-`int fseeko (FILE *STREAM, off_t OFFSET, int WHENCE)'
-     `stdio.h' (Unix98):  *note File Positioning::.
-
-`int fseeko64 (FILE *STREAM, off64_t OFFSET, int WHENCE)'
-     `stdio.h' (Unix98):  *note File Positioning::.
-
-`int F_SETFD'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Descriptor Flags::.
-
-`int F_SETFL'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Getting File Status Flags::.
-
-`int F_SETLK'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note File Locks::.
-
-`int F_SETLKW'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note File Locks::.
-
-`int __fsetlocking (FILE *STREAM, int TYPE)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Streams and Threads::.
-
-`int F_SETOWN'
-     `fcntl.h' (BSD):  *note Interrupt Input::.
-
-`int fsetpos (FILE *STREAM, const fpos_t *POSITION)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Portable Positioning::.
-
-`int fsetpos64 (FILE *STREAM, const fpos64_t *POSITION)'
-     `stdio.h' (Unix98):  *note Portable Positioning::.
-
-`int fstat (int FILEDES, struct stat *BUF)'
-     `sys/stat.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Reading Attributes::.
-
-`int fstat64 (int FILEDES, struct stat64 *BUF)'
-     `sys/stat.h' (Unix98):  *note Reading Attributes::.
-
-`int fsync (int FILDES)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX):  *note Synchronizing I/O::.
-
-`long int ftell (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note File Positioning::.
-
-`off_t ftello (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (Unix98):  *note File Positioning::.
-
-`off64_t ftello64 (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (Unix98):  *note File Positioning::.
-
-`int ftruncate (int FD, off_t LENGTH)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX):  *note File Size::.
-
-`int ftruncate64 (int ID, off64_t LENGTH)'
-     `unistd.h' (Unix98):  *note File Size::.
-
-`int ftrylockfile (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX):  *note Streams and Threads::.
-
-`int ftw (const char *FILENAME, __ftw_func_t FUNC, int DESCRIPTORS)'
-     `ftw.h' (SVID):  *note Working with Directory Trees::.
-
-`int ftw64 (const char *FILENAME, __ftw64_func_t FUNC, int DESCRIPTORS)'
-     `ftw.h' (Unix98):  *note Working with Directory Trees::.
-
-`__ftw64_func_t'
-     `ftw.h' (GNU):  *note Working with Directory Trees::.
-
-`__ftw_func_t'
-     `ftw.h' (GNU):  *note Working with Directory Trees::.
-
-`F_UNLCK'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note File Locks::.
-
-`void funlockfile (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX):  *note Streams and Threads::.
-
-`int futimes (int FD, const struct timeval TVP[2])'
-     `sys/time.h' (BSD):  *note File Times::.
-
-`int fwide (FILE *STREAM, int MODE)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Streams and I18N::.
-
-`int fwprintf (FILE *STREAM, const wchar_t *TEMPLATE, ...)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Formatted Output Functions::.
-
-`int __fwritable (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Opening Streams::.
-
-`size_t fwrite (const void *DATA, size_t SIZE, size_t COUNT, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Block Input/Output::.
-
-`size_t fwrite_unlocked (const void *DATA, size_t SIZE, size_t COUNT, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Block Input/Output::.
-
-`int __fwriting (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio_ext.h' (GNU):  *note Opening Streams::.
-
-`F_WRLCK'
-     `fcntl.h' (POSIX.1):  *note File Locks::.
-
-`int fwscanf (FILE *STREAM, const wchar_t *TEMPLATE, ...)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Formatted Input Functions::.
-
-`double gamma (double X)'
-     `math.h' (SVID):  *note Special Functions::.
-
-`float gammaf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (SVID):  *note Special Functions::.
-
-`long double gammal (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (SVID):  *note Special Functions::.
-
-`void (*__gconv_end_fct) (struct gconv_step *)'
-     `gconv.h' (GNU):  *note glibc iconv Implementation::.
-
-`int (*__gconv_fct) (struct __gconv_step *, struct __gconv_step_data *, const char **, const char *, size_t *, int)'
-     `gconv.h' (GNU):  *note glibc iconv Implementation::.
-
-`int (*__gconv_init_fct) (struct __gconv_step *)'
-     `gconv.h' (GNU):  *note glibc iconv Implementation::.
-
-`char * gcvt (double VALUE, int NDIGIT, char *BUF)'
-     `stdlib.h' (SVID, Unix98):  *note System V Number Conversion::.
-
-`unsigned long int getauxval (unsigned long int TYPE)'
-     `sys/auxv.h' (sys/auxv.h):  *note Auxiliary Vector::.
-
-`long int get_avphys_pages (void)'
-     `sys/sysinfo.h' (GNU):  *note Query Memory Parameters::.
-
-`int getc (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`int getchar (void)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`int getchar_unlocked (void)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`int getcontext (ucontext_t *UCP)'
-     `ucontext.h' (SVID):  *note System V contexts::.
-
-`int getc_unlocked (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (POSIX):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`char * get_current_dir_name (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (GNU):  *note Working Directory::.
-
-`char * getcwd (char *BUFFER, size_t SIZE)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Working Directory::.
-
-`struct tm * getdate (const char *STRING)'
-     `time.h' (Unix98):  *note General Time String Parsing::.
-
-`getdate_err'
-     `time.h' (Unix98):  *note General Time String Parsing::.
-
-`int getdate_r (const char *STRING, struct tm *TP)'
-     `time.h' (GNU):  *note General Time String Parsing::.
-
-`ssize_t getdelim (char **LINEPTR, size_t *N, int DELIMITER, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Line Input::.
-
-`int getdomainnname (char *NAME, size_t LENGTH)'
-     `unistd.h' (???):  *note Host Identification::.
-
-`gid_t getegid (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Reading Persona::.
-
-`char * getenv (const char *NAME)'
-     `stdlib.h' (ISO):  *note Environment Access::.
-
-`uid_t geteuid (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Reading Persona::.
-
-`struct fstab * getfsent (void)'
-     `fstab.h' (BSD):  *note fstab::.
-
-`struct fstab * getfsfile (const char *NAME)'
-     `fstab.h' (BSD):  *note fstab::.
-
-`struct fstab * getfsspec (const char *NAME)'
-     `fstab.h' (BSD):  *note fstab::.
-
-`gid_t getgid (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Reading Persona::.
-
-`struct group * getgrent (void)'
-     `grp.h' (SVID, BSD):  *note Scanning All Groups::.
-
-`int getgrent_r (struct group *RESULT_BUF, char *BUFFER, size_t BUFLEN, struct group **RESULT)'
-     `grp.h' (GNU):  *note Scanning All Groups::.
-
-`struct group * getgrgid (gid_t GID)'
-     `grp.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Lookup Group::.
-
-`int getgrgid_r (gid_t GID, struct group *RESULT_BUF, char *BUFFER, size_t BUFLEN, struct group **RESULT)'
-     `grp.h' (POSIX.1c):  *note Lookup Group::.
-
-`struct group * getgrnam (const char *NAME)'
-     `grp.h' (SVID, BSD):  *note Lookup Group::.
-
-`int getgrnam_r (const char *NAME, struct group *RESULT_BUF, char *BUFFER, size_t BUFLEN, struct group **RESULT)'
-     `grp.h' (POSIX.1c):  *note Lookup Group::.
-
-`int getgrouplist (const char *USER, gid_t GROUP, gid_t *GROUPS, int *NGROUPS)'
-     `grp.h' (BSD):  *note Setting Groups::.
-
-`int getgroups (int COUNT, gid_t *GROUPS)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Reading Persona::.
-
-`struct hostent * gethostbyaddr (const void *ADDR, socklen_t LENGTH, int FORMAT)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Host Names::.
-
-`int gethostbyaddr_r (const void *ADDR, socklen_t LENGTH, int FORMAT, struct hostent *restrict RESULT_BUF, char *restrict BUF, size_t BUFLEN, struct hostent **restrict RESULT, int *restrict H_ERRNOP)'
-     `netdb.h' (GNU):  *note Host Names::.
-
-`struct hostent * gethostbyname (const char *NAME)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Host Names::.
-
-`struct hostent * gethostbyname2 (const char *NAME, int AF)'
-     `netdb.h' (IPv6 Basic API):  *note Host Names::.
-
-`int gethostbyname2_r (const char *NAME, int AF, struct hostent *restrict RESULT_BUF, char *restrict BUF, size_t BUFLEN, struct hostent **restrict RESULT, int *restrict H_ERRNOP)'
-     `netdb.h' (GNU):  *note Host Names::.
-
-`int gethostbyname_r (const char *restrict NAME, struct hostent *restrict RESULT_BUF, char *restrict BUF, size_t BUFLEN, struct hostent **restrict RESULT, int *restrict H_ERRNOP)'
-     `netdb.h' (GNU):  *note Host Names::.
-
-`struct hostent * gethostent (void)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Host Names::.
-
-`long int gethostid (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (BSD):  *note Host Identification::.
-
-`int gethostname (char *NAME, size_t SIZE)'
-     `unistd.h' (BSD):  *note Host Identification::.
-
-`int getitimer (int WHICH, struct itimerval *OLD)'
-     `sys/time.h' (BSD):  *note Setting an Alarm::.
-
-`ssize_t getline (char **LINEPTR, size_t *N, FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (GNU):  *note Line Input::.
-
-`int getloadavg (double LOADAVG[], int NELEM)'
-     `stdlib.h' (BSD):  *note Processor Resources::.
-
-`char * getlogin (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Who Logged In::.
-
-`struct mntent * getmntent (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `mntent.h' (BSD):  *note mtab::.
-
-`struct mntent * getmntent_r (FILE *STREAM, struct mntent *RESULT, char *BUFFER, int BUFSIZE)'
-     `mntent.h' (BSD):  *note mtab::.
-
-`struct netent * getnetbyaddr (uint32_t NET, int TYPE)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Networks Database::.
-
-`struct netent * getnetbyname (const char *NAME)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Networks Database::.
-
-`struct netent * getnetent (void)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Networks Database::.
-
-`int getnetgrent (char **HOSTP, char **USERP, char **DOMAINP)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Lookup Netgroup::.
-
-`int getnetgrent_r (char **HOSTP, char **USERP, char **DOMAINP, char *BUFFER, size_t BUFLEN)'
-     `netdb.h' (GNU):  *note Lookup Netgroup::.
-
-`int get_nprocs (void)'
-     `sys/sysinfo.h' (GNU):  *note Processor Resources::.
-
-`int get_nprocs_conf (void)'
-     `sys/sysinfo.h' (GNU):  *note Processor Resources::.
-
-`int getopt (int ARGC, char *const *ARGV, const char *OPTIONS)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Using Getopt::.
-
-`int getopt_long (int ARGC, char *const *ARGV, const char *SHORTOPTS, const struct option *LONGOPTS, int *INDEXPTR)'
-     `getopt.h' (GNU):  *note Getopt Long Options::.
-
-`int getopt_long_only (int ARGC, char *const *ARGV, const char *SHORTOPTS, const struct option *LONGOPTS, int *INDEXPTR)'
-     `getopt.h' (GNU):  *note Getopt Long Options::.
-
-`int getpagesize (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (BSD):  *note Query Memory Parameters::.
-
-`char * getpass (const char *PROMPT)'
-     `unistd.h' (BSD):  *note getpass::.
-
-`int getpeername (int SOCKET, struct sockaddr *ADDR, socklen_t *LENGTH-PTR)'
-     `sys/socket.h' (BSD):  *note Who is Connected::.
-
-`int getpgid (pid_t PID)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Process Group Functions::.
-
-`pid_t getpgrp (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Process Group Functions::.
-
-`long int get_phys_pages (void)'
-     `sys/sysinfo.h' (GNU):  *note Query Memory Parameters::.
-
-`pid_t getpid (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Process Identification::.
-
-`pid_t getppid (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Process Identification::.
-
-`int getpriority (int CLASS, int ID)'
-     `sys/resource.h' (BSD,POSIX):  *note Traditional Scheduling
-     Functions::.
-
-`struct protoent * getprotobyname (const char *NAME)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Protocols Database::.
-
-`struct protoent * getprotobynumber (int PROTOCOL)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Protocols Database::.
-
-`struct protoent * getprotoent (void)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Protocols Database::.
-
-`int getpt (void)'
-     `stdlib.h' (GNU):  *note Allocation::.
-
-`struct passwd * getpwent (void)'
-     `pwd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Scanning All Users::.
-
-`int getpwent_r (struct passwd *RESULT_BUF, char *BUFFER, size_t BUFLEN, struct passwd **RESULT)'
-     `pwd.h' (GNU):  *note Scanning All Users::.
-
-`struct passwd * getpwnam (const char *NAME)'
-     `pwd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Lookup User::.
-
-`int getpwnam_r (const char *NAME, struct passwd *RESULT_BUF, char *BUFFER, size_t BUFLEN, struct passwd **RESULT)'
-     `pwd.h' (POSIX.1c):  *note Lookup User::.
-
-`struct passwd * getpwuid (uid_t UID)'
-     `pwd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Lookup User::.
-
-`int getpwuid_r (uid_t UID, struct passwd *RESULT_BUF, char *BUFFER, size_t BUFLEN, struct passwd **RESULT)'
-     `pwd.h' (POSIX.1c):  *note Lookup User::.
-
-`int getrlimit (int RESOURCE, struct rlimit *RLP)'
-     `sys/resource.h' (BSD):  *note Limits on Resources::.
-
-`int getrlimit64 (int RESOURCE, struct rlimit64 *RLP)'
-     `sys/resource.h' (Unix98):  *note Limits on Resources::.
-
-`int getrusage (int PROCESSES, struct rusage *RUSAGE)'
-     `sys/resource.h' (BSD):  *note Resource Usage::.
-
-`char * gets (char *S)'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Line Input::.
-
-`struct servent * getservbyname (const char *NAME, const char *PROTO)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Services Database::.
-
-`struct servent * getservbyport (int PORT, const char *PROTO)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Services Database::.
-
-`struct servent * getservent (void)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Services Database::.
-
-`pid_t getsid (pid_t PID)'
-     `unistd.h' (SVID):  *note Process Group Functions::.
-
-`int getsockname (int SOCKET, struct sockaddr *ADDR, socklen_t *LENGTH-PTR)'
-     `sys/socket.h' (BSD):  *note Reading Address::.
-
-`int getsockopt (int SOCKET, int LEVEL, int OPTNAME, void *OPTVAL, socklen_t *OPTLEN-PTR)'
-     `sys/socket.h' (BSD):  *note Socket Option Functions::.
-
-`int getsubopt (char **OPTIONP, char *const *TOKENS, char **VALUEP)'
-     `stdlib.h' (stdlib.h):  *note Suboptions Example: Suboptions.
-
-`char * gettext (const char *MSGID)'
-     `libintl.h' (GNU):  *note Translation with gettext::.
-
-`int gettimeofday (struct timeval *TP, struct timezone *TZP)'
-     `sys/time.h' (BSD):  *note High-Resolution Calendar::.
-
-`uid_t getuid (void)'
-     `unistd.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Reading Persona::.
-
-`mode_t getumask (void)'
-     `sys/stat.h' (GNU):  *note Setting Permissions::.
-
-`struct utmp * getutent (void)'
-     `utmp.h' (SVID):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`int getutent_r (struct utmp *BUFFER, struct utmp **RESULT)'
-     `utmp.h' (GNU):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`struct utmp * getutid (const struct utmp *ID)'
-     `utmp.h' (SVID):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`int getutid_r (const struct utmp *ID, struct utmp *BUFFER, struct utmp **RESULT)'
-     `utmp.h' (GNU):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`struct utmp * getutline (const struct utmp *LINE)'
-     `utmp.h' (SVID):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`int getutline_r (const struct utmp *LINE, struct utmp *BUFFER, struct utmp **RESULT)'
-     `utmp.h' (GNU):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`int getutmp (const struct utmpx *UTMPX, struct utmp *UTMP)'
-     `utmp.h' (GNU):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`int getutmpx (const struct utmp *UTMP, struct utmpx *UTMPX)'
-     `utmp.h' (GNU):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`struct utmpx * getutxent (void)'
-     `utmpx.h' (XPG4.2):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`struct utmpx * getutxid (const struct utmpx *ID)'
-     `utmpx.h' (XPG4.2):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`struct utmpx * getutxline (const struct utmpx *LINE)'
-     `utmpx.h' (XPG4.2):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`int getw (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `stdio.h' (SVID):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`wint_t getwc (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`wint_t getwchar (void)'
-     `wchar.h' (ISO):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`wint_t getwchar_unlocked (void)'
-     `wchar.h' (GNU):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`wint_t getwc_unlocked (FILE *STREAM)'
-     `wchar.h' (GNU):  *note Character Input::.
-
-`char * getwd (char *BUFFER)'
-     `unistd.h' (BSD):  *note Working Directory::.
-
-`gid_t'
-     `sys/types.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Reading Persona::.
-
-`int glob (const char *PATTERN, int FLAGS, int (*ERRFUNC) (const char *FILENAME, int ERROR-CODE), glob_t *VECTOR-PTR)'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Calling Glob::.
-
-`int glob64 (const char *PATTERN, int FLAGS, int (*ERRFUNC) (const char *FILENAME, int ERROR-CODE), glob64_t *VECTOR-PTR)'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note Calling Glob::.
-
-`glob64_t'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note Calling Glob::.
-
-`GLOB_ABORTED'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Calling Glob::.
-
-`GLOB_ALTDIRFUNC'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_APPEND'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_BRACE'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_DOOFFS'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_ERR'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`void globfree (glob_t *PGLOB)'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`void globfree64 (glob64_t *PGLOB)'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_MAGCHAR'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_MARK'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_NOCHECK'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_NOESCAPE'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_NOMAGIC'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_NOMATCH'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Calling Glob::.
-
-`GLOB_NOSORT'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_NOSPACE'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Calling Glob::.
-
-`GLOB_ONLYDIR'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_PERIOD'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`glob_t'
-     `glob.h' (POSIX.2):  *note Calling Glob::.
-
-`GLOB_TILDE'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`GLOB_TILDE_CHECK'
-     `glob.h' (GNU):  *note More Flags for Globbing::.
-
-`struct tm * gmtime (const time_t *TIME)'
-     `time.h' (ISO):  *note Broken-down Time::.
-
-`struct tm * gmtime_r (const time_t *TIME, struct tm *RESULTP)'
-     `time.h' (POSIX.1c):  *note Broken-down Time::.
-
-`_GNU_SOURCE'
-     (GNU):  *note Feature Test Macros::.
-
-`int grantpt (int FILEDES)'
-     `stdlib.h' (SVID, XPG4.2):  *note Allocation::.
-
-`int gsignal (int SIGNUM)'
-     `signal.h' (SVID):  *note Signaling Yourself::.
-
-`int gtty (int FILEDES, struct sgttyb *ATTRIBUTES)'
-     `sgtty.h' (BSD):  *note BSD Terminal Modes::.
-
-`char * hasmntopt (const struct mntent *MNT, const char *OPT)'
-     `mntent.h' (BSD):  *note mtab::.
-
-`int hcreate (size_t NEL)'
-     `search.h' (SVID):  *note Hash Search Function::.
-
-`int hcreate_r (size_t NEL, struct hsearch_data *HTAB)'
-     `search.h' (GNU):  *note Hash Search Function::.
-
-`void hdestroy (void)'
-     `search.h' (SVID):  *note Hash Search Function::.
-
-`void hdestroy_r (struct hsearch_data *HTAB)'
-     `search.h' (GNU):  *note Hash Search Function::.
-
-`HOST_NOT_FOUND'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Host Names::.
-
-`ENTRY * hsearch (ENTRY ITEM, ACTION ACTION)'
-     `search.h' (SVID):  *note Hash Search Function::.
-
-`int hsearch_r (ENTRY ITEM, ACTION ACTION, ENTRY **RETVAL, struct hsearch_data *HTAB)'
-     `search.h' (GNU):  *note Hash Search Function::.
-
-`uint32_t htonl (uint32_t HOSTLONG)'
-     `netinet/in.h' (BSD):  *note Byte Order::.
-
-`uint16_t htons (uint16_t HOSTSHORT)'
-     `netinet/in.h' (BSD):  *note Byte Order::.
-
-`double HUGE_VAL'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Math Error Reporting::.
-
-`float HUGE_VALF'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Math Error Reporting::.
-
-`long double HUGE_VALL'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Math Error Reporting::.
-
-`tcflag_t HUPCL'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Control Modes::.
-
-`double hypot (double X, double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`float hypotf (float X, float Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`long double hypotl (long double X, long double Y)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`tcflag_t ICANON'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`size_t iconv (iconv_t CD, char **INBUF, size_t *INBYTESLEFT, char **OUTBUF, size_t *OUTBYTESLEFT)'
-     `iconv.h' (XPG2):  *note Generic Conversion Interface::.
-
-`int iconv_close (iconv_t CD)'
-     `iconv.h' (XPG2):  *note Generic Conversion Interface::.
-
-`iconv_t iconv_open (const char *TOCODE, const char *FROMCODE)'
-     `iconv.h' (XPG2):  *note Generic Conversion Interface::.
-
-`iconv_t'
-     `iconv.h' (XPG2):  *note Generic Conversion Interface::.
-
-`tcflag_t ICRNL'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Input Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t IEXTEN'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Local Modes::.
-
-`void if_freenameindex (struct if_nameindex *PTR)'
-     `net/if.h' (IPv6 basic API):  *note Interface Naming::.
-
-`char * if_indextoname (unsigned int IFINDEX, char *IFNAME)'
-     `net/if.h' (IPv6 basic API):  *note Interface Naming::.
-
-`struct if_nameindex * if_nameindex (void)'
-     `net/if.h' (IPv6 basic API):  *note Interface Naming::.
-
-`unsigned int if_nametoindex (const char *IFNAME)'
-     `net/if.h' (IPv6 basic API):  *note Interface Naming::.
-
-`size_t IFNAMSIZ'
-     `net/if.h' (net/if.h):  *note Interface Naming::.
-
-`int IFTODT (mode_t MODE)'
-     `dirent.h' (BSD):  *note Directory Entries::.
-
-`tcflag_t IGNBRK'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Input Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t IGNCR'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Input Modes::.
-
-`tcflag_t IGNPAR'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Input Modes::.
-
-`int ilogb (double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`int ilogbf (float X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`int ilogbl (long double X)'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Exponents and Logarithms::.
-
-`intmax_t imaxabs (intmax_t NUMBER)'
-     `inttypes.h' (ISO):  *note Absolute Value::.
-
-`tcflag_t IMAXBEL'
-     `termios.h' (BSD):  *note Input Modes::.
-
-`imaxdiv_t imaxdiv (intmax_t NUMERATOR, intmax_t DENOMINATOR)'
-     `inttypes.h' (ISO):  *note Integer Division::.
-
-`imaxdiv_t'
-     `inttypes.h' (ISO):  *note Integer Division::.
-
-`struct in6_addr in6addr_any'
-     `netinet/in.h' (IPv6 basic API):  *note Host Address Data Type::.
-
-`struct in6_addr in6addr_loopback'
-     `netinet/in.h' (IPv6 basic API):  *note Host Address Data Type::.
-
-`uint32_t INADDR_ANY'
-     `netinet/in.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Data Type::.
-
-`uint32_t INADDR_BROADCAST'
-     `netinet/in.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Data Type::.
-
-`uint32_t INADDR_LOOPBACK'
-     `netinet/in.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Data Type::.
-
-`uint32_t INADDR_NONE'
-     `netinet/in.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Data Type::.
-
-`char * index (const char *STRING, int C)'
-     `string.h' (BSD):  *note Search Functions::.
-
-`uint32_t inet_addr (const char *NAME)'
-     `arpa/inet.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Functions::.
-
-`int inet_aton (const char *NAME, struct in_addr *ADDR)'
-     `arpa/inet.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Functions::.
-
-`uint32_t inet_lnaof (struct in_addr ADDR)'
-     `arpa/inet.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Functions::.
-
-`struct in_addr inet_makeaddr (uint32_t NET, uint32_t LOCAL)'
-     `arpa/inet.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Functions::.
-
-`uint32_t inet_netof (struct in_addr ADDR)'
-     `arpa/inet.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Functions::.
-
-`uint32_t inet_network (const char *NAME)'
-     `arpa/inet.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Functions::.
-
-`char * inet_ntoa (struct in_addr ADDR)'
-     `arpa/inet.h' (BSD):  *note Host Address Functions::.
-
-`const char * inet_ntop (int AF, const void *CP, char *BUF, socklen_t LEN)'
-     `arpa/inet.h' (IPv6 basic API):  *note Host Address Functions::.
-
-`int inet_pton (int AF, const char *CP, void *BUF)'
-     `arpa/inet.h' (IPv6 basic API):  *note Host Address Functions::.
-
-`float INFINITY'
-     `math.h' (ISO):  *note Infinity and NaN::.
-
-`int initgroups (const char *USER, gid_t GROUP)'
-     `grp.h' (BSD):  *note Setting Groups::.
-
-`INIT_PROCESS'
-     `utmp.h' (SVID):  *note Manipulating the Database::.
-
-`INIT_PROCESS'
-     `utmpx.h' (XPG4.2):  *note XPG Functions::.
-
-`char * initstate (unsigned int SEED, char *STATE, size_t SIZE)'
-     `stdlib.h' (BSD):  *note BSD Random::.
-
-`int initstate_r (unsigned int SEED, char *restrict STATEBUF, size_t STATELEN, struct random_data *restrict BUF)'
-     `stdlib.h' (GNU):  *note BSD Random::.
-
-`tcflag_t INLCR'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Input Modes::.
-
-`int innetgr (const char *NETGROUP, const char *HOST, const char *USER, const char *DOMAIN)'
-     `netdb.h' (BSD):  *note Netgroup Membership::.
-
-`ino64_t'
-     `sys/types.h' (Unix98):  *note Attribute Meanings::.
-
-`ino_t'
-     `sys/types.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Attribute Meanings::.
-
-`tcflag_t INPCK'
-     `termios.h' (POSIX.1):  *note Input Modes::.
-
-`INT_MAX'
-     `limits.h' (ISO):  *note Range of Type::.
-
-`INT_MIN'
-     `limits.h' (ISO):  *note Range of Type::.
-
-`int ioctl (int FILEDES, int COMMAND, ...)'
-     `sys/ioctl.h' (BSD):  *note IOCTLs::.
-
-`int _IOFBF'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Controlling Buffering::.
-
-`int _IOLBF'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Controlling Buffering::.
-
-`int _IONBF'
-     `stdio.h' (ISO):  *note Controlling Buffering::.
-
-`int IPPORT_RESERVED'
-     `netinet/in.h' (BSD):  *note Ports::.
-
-`int IPPORT_USERRESERVED'
-     `netinet/in.h' (BSD):  *note Ports::.
-
-`int isalnum (int C)'
-     `ctype.h' (ISO):  *note Classification of Characters::.
-
-`int isalpha (int C)'
-     `ctype.h' (ISO):  *note Classif